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Bartolomé de las Casas download epub

by Helen Rand Parish,Francis Patrick Sullivan


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Bartolome de las Casas (1484-1566) is the key to the quincentenary debate-should we celebrate or should we weep? . Las Casas' treatise is a beautiful blend of Thomistic philosophy and Catholic pastoral theology.

Bartolome de las Casas (1484-1566) is the key to the quincentenary debate-should we celebrate or should we weep? His was the main cry against the tragic fate of the Indians. I think it will surprise some readers how "modern" Las Casas can sound, even though he bases his thought on the medieval Catholic tradition. Helen Rand Parish provides several different informative introductions to the text.

Bartolomé de las Casas book. Las Casas, called the "Defender of the Indians", wrote his most famous treatise, De Unico Modo in the 1550s. This translation provides a picture of the spiritual experience of the man whose quest for social justice is relevant for us today.

Translated by Francis Patrick SullivanS. New York: Paulist, 1992. Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox, 1992.

Bartolomé de las Casas: Ethics and the Eschaton return presented his son with a young native of Hispaniola (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic). This slave was baptized at the cathedral of Seville and given the name Juanico. Juanico spent the bulk of his adult life as Bartolomé’s personal servant and companion, making Las Casas one of the first Europeans to enter a longterm relationship with a native of the Americas.

Bartolome de las Casas (1484-1566) is the key to the quincentenary . This book begins his rediscovery in 1992. Sullivan's translation of The Only Way to Draw All People to a Living Faith lets us hear Las Casas in full at last.

Bartolome de las Casas (1484-1566) is the key to the quincentenary debate-should we celebrate or should we weep? His was the main cry against the tragic fate of the Indians, the main cry for reform. Until now, he has been known only from incomplete sources. Parish's introduction shows that Las Casas was barely 18 when he came to America in 1502, spending the next decade as a planter in the West Indies. He befriended the natives, but saw them cruelly massacred and exploited by conquistadors.

Translations and Notes by Francis Patrick Sullivan, S.

Translations and Notes by Francis Patrick Sullivan, SJ. (Kansas City, Missouri: Sheed & Ward. The late Frank Sullivan put together this fascinating collection of excerpts, mostly from his unpublished Las Casas translations, when the Angel of Death was hovering too close.

Bartolome de las Casas (1484-1566) is the key to the quincentenary debate should we celebrate or should we weep? .

Bartolome de las Casas (1484-1566) is the key to the quincentenary debate should we celebrate or should we weep? His was the main cry against the tragic fate of the Indians, the main cry for reform. He befriended the natives, but saw them cruelly massacred and exploited by conquistadors

Oct 10, 1912 Waterbury, Connecticut. As a bi-lingual writer, Parish wrote in English and Spanish, focusing mainly on non-fiction books and essays on the life and writings of Bartolome de las Casas, as well as themes of Christianity and Central America, the relationship between Latin America and the United States, and Spanish American literature. Parish co-wrote with Henry Raup Wagner: "The Life and Writings of Bartolome de Las Casas" (1967).

Francis Patrick Sullivan, . New York, NY: Paulist Press, 1992), 12. . Elliott, Imperial Spain: 1469-1716. Bartolomé de las Casas in History: Toward an Understanding of the Man and His Work. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1971), 68. Francis Augustus MacNutt, Bartholomew De Las Casas: His Life, His Apostolate and His Writings. Helen Rand-Parish, interview by author, tape recording, Berkeley, C. February 12, 2001; Friede and Keen, Bartolomé de las Casas in History, 70. Sullivan, Indian Freedom, 2-3. Las Casas, The Only Way,14-15.

Bartolomé de las Casas was a Spanish historian and colonist, also known as a Dominican friar. He was also one of the first Europeans to openly condemn the atrocities committed by Europeans on the Native Indians of the Latin American lands and the West Indies

Bartolomé de las Casas was a Spanish historian and colonist, also known as a Dominican friar. He was also one of the first Europeans to openly condemn the atrocities committed by Europeans on the Native Indians of the Latin American lands and the West Indies. He called for the abolition of slavery in the American peninsula.

Bartolome de las Casas (1484-1566) is the key to the quincentenary debate--should we celebrate or should we weep? His was the main cry against the tragic fate of the Indians, the main cry for reform. Until now, he has been known only from incomplete sources. This book begins his rediscovery in 1992.Parish's introduction shows that Las Casas was barely 18 when he came to America in 1502, spending the next decade as a planter in the West Indies. He befriended the natives, but saw them cruelly massacred and exploited by conquistadors. In 1514 the mounting shock turned him into a defender of the Indians from then until his death at 82. As a priest-colonist, a Dominican friar, a bishop, he fought at court in the New World for their full human rights, using his first book, The Only Way, to great effect. The earliest version produced a papal encyclical on behalf of the Indians, the second motivated an emperor to issue laws protecting them, the third taught a generation of Spanish scholars.Sullivan's translation of The Only Way to Draw All People to a Living Faith lets us hear Las Casas in full at last. The familiar horrors and denunciations are all there, but so is a gentle voice filled with compassion and yearning for peace. For centuries, the treatise influenced mission theory and practice in many lands; modern writers studied its misiology and its relation to his own mission experiment. But this new version--the lost opening reconstructed, the massive proof texts banished, the original form restored--reveals the doctrine that guided Las Casas' career. In it, he pleads for the way of Christ: evangelization by peaceful charity and respect not by "fire and the sword." Sullivan has given us a brilliant rendering of the powerful central version Fray Bartolome composed at Oaxaca in 1539 to change the conscience of Christendom. The work makes the same appeal to conscience today.

Comments: (5)

Ballazan
This is the only English translation of Las Casas "The Only Way." Las Casas' treatise is a beautiful blend of Thomistic philosophy and Catholic pastoral theology. I think it will surprise some readers how "modern" Las Casas can sound, even though he bases his thought on the medieval Catholic tradition. Helen Rand Parish provides several different informative introductions to the text. Highly recommended!
Cordann
Good reading, this will keep me busy for a few days. LOVE, the true story of real people in the troubled past.
Forey
A very rare and difficult translation of one of de las Casas most important treatises.
Akta
The book came on time and clear of blemishes.
Dangerous
Todos los que provenimos de una familia de origen latinoamericano o hemos estudiado algun libro de historia de america entendemos las grandes injusticias que se cometieron en la epoca de la conquista de america, pero no todo fue asi, de la oscuridad y corrupcion salio una luz que trajo esperanza para los indios, su nombre ya es sinonimo de proteccion y lucha contra la injusticia de lo hombres, este libro toma a este Fraile Dominico Bartolome de Las Casas y lo saca de la oscuridad para presentarlo como era un hombre con una gran compasion y amor por el projimo.
Bartolomé de las Casas download epub
Ministry & Evangelism
Author: Helen Rand Parish,Francis Patrick Sullivan
ISBN: 0809103672
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Ministry & Evangelism
Language: Spanish
Publisher: Paulist Pr (January 1, 1992)
Pages: 281 pages