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The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry download epub

by Andrew Root


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Andrew Root and Kenda Creasy Dean invite you to envision youth ministries full of practical . YouthWorker Journal, July/August 2011). The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry is a practical theology winner.

Andrew Root and Kenda Creasy Dean invite you to envision youth ministries full of practical theologians, addressing the deep questions of life with a wonderfully adolescent mix of idealism, cynicism, and prophetic intolerance for hypocrisy. Youth & Discipleship Leadership, Summer 2012). Newcomers to practical theology will applaud its interplay of experience, reflection and action. Veterans to the field will give its masterful synergy of breadth and depth a standing ovation.

Andrew Root joined Luther Seminary in 2005 as assistant professor of youth and family ministry.

Fantastic book on how youth ministry is not simply pragmatic, but is at it's core practical theology. I found particularly helpful the second part where youth ministry practices such as camp and missions trips were interpreted and evaluated through a theological lens. Andrew Root joined Luther Seminary in 2005 as assistant professor of youth and family ministry. Previously he was an adjunct professor at Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington . and Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, .

Andrew Root is the Olson Baalson Associate Professor of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary. In 2012, his book The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry (with Kenda Creasy Dean) received Christianity Today’s Award of Merit

Andrew Root is the Olson Baalson Associate Professor of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary. He is most recently the author of Christopraxis: A Practical Theology of the Cross and Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker. In 2012, his book The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry (with Kenda Creasy Dean) received Christianity Today’s Award of Merit. or follow us on Twitter (@YM Initiative).

Andrew Root and Kenda Creasy Dean invite you to envision youth ministries full of practical theologians, addressing the . It is time to turn to theological substance and faith formation. This book talks about why this is true, and more important, it demonstrates how it may be done.

Andrew Root and Kenda Creasy Dean invite you to envision youth ministries full of practical theologians, addressing the deep questions of life with a wonderfully adolescent mix of idealism, cynicism and prophetic intolerance for hypocrisy. The closing postscript on youth ministry as practical theology is worth the price of admission.

The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry is a practical theology winner. The book provides the course on theology of ministry that most youth leaders and pastors never got in Bible school or seminary, and the one indispensable text that professors of youth ministry have been longing for. – Ray S. Anderson. Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry establishes Andrew Root as a seminal voice in a new generation of youth ministry scholars.

Kenda Creasy Dean and I have called this development the theological turn in our book The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry.

In Taking Theology to Youth Ministry, Andrew Root invites you along on a journey with Nadia-a fictional youth worker who is trying to understand the why behind her ministry. Her narrative, along with Root’s insights, help you uncover the action of God as it pertains to your own youth ministry, and encourage you to discover how you can participate in that action. Kenda Creasy Dean and I have called this development the theological turn in our book The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry. These books continue fleshing out this turn, hoping to give more depth and direction as we make this shift.

Andrew Root and Kenda Creasy Dean invite you to envision youth ministries full of practical theologians, addressing . I am euphoric over Kenda Creasy Dean and Andrew Root's book, The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry.

Youth ministry as practical theology is not new. You have been doing practical theology at some level from the first moment you started intentionally living as a Christian. Practical theological reflection is what thoughtful people of faith (including youth ministers!) have done for centuries to make decisions about ministry and mission: (a) understand a situation calling for a faithful response, (b) reflect on this situation with all relevant tools of discernment, including those offered by the gospel itself, and (c) construct a faithful response to this particular situation.

by Andrew Root, Kenda Creasy Dean. Books related to The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry. You are in the United States store. Gospel-Centered Ministry. Think Biblically! (Trade Paper): Recovering a Christian Worldview.

Andrew Root (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is the Olson .

Andrew Root (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is the Olson Baalson associate professor of youth and family ministry at Luther Seminary (St. Paul, Minnesota). Andy has worked in congregations, parachurch ministries, and social service programs. He lives in St. Paul with his wife, Kara, two children, Owen and Maisy, and their two dogs, Kirby and Kimmel. When not reading, writing, or teaching, Andy spends far too much time watching TV and movies.

2012 Christianity Today Book Award of Merit winner! What haunts your youth group? So often we avoid talking about doubts and fears because we feel inadequately equipped to address them in any meaningful way. The crisis of existence can't be answered with pat Sunday school formulas or a few Bible verses, let alone another relay race. The questions our youth have are often the same ones that perplexed the great theologians, driving them to search for God in the places God didn't appear to be--places of brokenness, suffering and confusion. What if we let these questions drive our search for God too? Andrew Root and Kenda Creasy Dean invite you to envision youth ministries full of practical theologians, addressing the deep questions of life with a wonderfully adolescent mix of idealism, cynicism and prophetic intolerance for hypocrisy. Follow them into reflection on your own practice of theology, and learn how to share that theology through rich, compassionate conversation and purposeful experience.

Comments: (7)

Corgustari
Here's a simple challenge. This coming Sunday carefully and cautiously approach the youth pastor in your church and ask, "What is your theology of ministry?" If he stares at you like you're from the former planet known as Pluto, don't be surprised. Unfortunately, it's the response of most youth pastors today. If, however, you're met with a well-crafted, carefully articulated response, one which makes sense both in theological and practical terms, consider yourself lucky.

As Kenda Creasy Dean, co-author of The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry notes, the turn in youth ministry is "...an era in which theological reflection is becoming the norm in youth ministry instead of the exception... it [youth ministry] has not always been concerned with theological reflection. This is not to say that theology wasn't happening, or that youth workers didn't care about theology. But it is to say that youth workers' actions and self-conceptions were rarely informed by significant theological reflection." Theological reflection is "becoming the norm?" This undoubtedly is a positive marker in the progress of youth ministry, isn't it? It's a rhetorical question.

Although The Theological Turn... reflects a different faith tradition than the school I teach at, it still offers valuable points for consideration. It is divided into two parts, with Part I, "Theological Starting Points," addressing the question, "What does theology have to do with youth ministry?" This section invites the reader to envision "practical" theology (over-and-against systematic or historical theology) as an integrative imperative for youth ministry practice. In this respect the authors emphasize the roles that experience, reflection, and action play in the outworking of youth ministry programs. They challenge academics and practitioners alike, "... that by seeing youth ministry as a theological task, theory and practice are held together. It is too often assumed that youth ministry is for doers and not for thinkers. Yet good doing demands good thinking."

As the authors discuss what is required for "good thinking" to take place, they exhort youth ministers to return to a reformed "representative" theological tradition, pointing students to a shared experience of suffering--suffering common to all humanity--ultimately redeemed through Christ's sacrifice on the cross. This representative perspective, according to the authors, provides a way to hold a correct theology of humanity's need and Christ's atoning work together, connecting Jesus' identity as a shared representative with His work of redemption. The authors note, "Youth intuit that salvation lies in finding someone who loves them enough to die for them, and the whole of adolescence is directed toward this end." Thus, the theological starting point for the turn in youth ministry begins with practical theology, which will begin to slide the center of youth ministry thought toward a historical and deeply traditional Christian understanding of shared suffering.

The second half of Part I offers suggestions as to how to initiate this kind of theological thinking. The language, however, can tend to be heavy with academic and theological jargon (e.g., historical dogmatics, kerygma, Bultmann's existentialism, via negative hermeneutics) unfamiliar to many youth workers. It may even be overwhelming. And while the authors "raise the bar" by motivating youth ministers to think theologically, my concern with this section has more to do with wording which may not speak to all Christian faith traditions. The specific historical theological language advocated by the authors may detract from the importance of the message, and its implications for broad theological contexts of youth ministry.

Part II, "Theology Enacted," focuses on the pragmatic side of youth ministry, providing methodological examples built on theoretical concepts addressed in Part I. This is the more easily digestible section of the book, as both authors demonstrate how theological considerations can be integrated into specific ministry contexts.Topics include:

* A biblical understanding of the miraculous: how the miraculous works within the meaning of suffering.
* Sin v. sinning: how to talk with students about the doctrine of sin.
* A theological perspective on adolescent hormones, desire, and sexuality.
* An eschatological way of viewing camps, retreats, and conferences.
* Outdoor trips: experiencing God and facing the crisis of reality.
* Service and mission trips: global tourism, or seeking the suffering vagabond?
* A catechetical model for confirmation: a suggested curriculum.
* Merging eschatology and hope into the here-and-now.

Each of these chapters provides rich dialogue, mixed with practical implications for specific ministry programs. The authors draw on current hot topics within youth ministry, providing exactly the kind of integrative approach encouraged throughout the rest of book. The authors do an exceptional job demonstrating the rich theological thinking required and necessary for contemporary youth ministry.
Der Bat
All huge generalizations have some truth in them. What Andrew describes as a turn may be seen as nothing more than a pendulum swing away from practice back towards theory. The supposed bane of The Ivory Tower for many years is now The Answer for subjectivism....I suggest one read pages 45-46 to get the most benefit in the shortest amount of reading. The book as a whole is full of holes, not the least of which is its contradictions based in a Barthian theology of Skepticism.
IVP has published a potentially useful tome that could fuel discussion, but it remains for history to judge if "The result is a more rigorous and meaningful youth ministry, and a more theologically grounded and engaged church." (Back cover.)
snowball
This is an excellent book assessing and guiding the way that we do ministry to youth. I am the director of a campus ministry and found the book to be very helpful for my context as well. The authors take an in depth look at how we have done ministry, solid theology to back up a new approach and offer helpful ideas for how this might look in real life. This is a book that every person working in youth or campus ministry should read. Not necessarily an easy read, but well worth your time.
Brol
Fantastic book on how youth ministry is not simply pragmatic, but is at it's core practical theology. Root and Dean spend the first half of the book explaining what youth ministry has to do with theology, and how theology is essential for youth ministry.

I found particularly helpful the second part where youth ministry practices and topics are interpreted and evaluated through a theological lens. The authors address how we speak to teens about Jesus and sin, as well deepen our theological understanding of events such as summer camp, missions trips, wilderness adventures, and confirmation.

Anyone interested in how to take teens deeper into God's Word should read this book!
Tebei
Book discusses past trends in youth ministry and discusses a new approach that does not involve watering down material for youth.
YSOP
I am a big fan of Andrew Root. This book with Kenda Dean was no exception. The two really hit on some key aspects of effective youth ministries. Some of the chapters near the end of the book are less powerful, but overall a deep book with important theological insights.
The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry download epub
Ministry & Evangelism
Author: Andrew Root
ISBN: 0830838252
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Ministry & Evangelism
Language: English
Publisher: IVP Books; unknown edition (September 18, 2011)
Pages: 352 pages