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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen download epub

by Alan Moore


Epub Book: 1313 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1265 kb.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic book series co-created by writer Alan Moore and artist Kevin O'Neill which began in 1999

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic book series co-created by writer Alan Moore and artist Kevin O'Neill which began in 1999. The series spans two six-issue limited series, Volume I, Volume II, and an original graphic novel Black Dossier from the America's Best Comics imprint of DC Comics, as well as a third volume.

Book 1 of 5 in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Series. Alan Moore is perhaps the most acclaimed writer in the graphic story medium, having garnered countless awards for works such as Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Swamp Thing and Miracleman

Book 1 of 5 in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Series. Alan Moore is perhaps the most acclaimed writer in the graphic story medium, having garnered countless awards for works such as Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Swamp Thing and Miracleman. Paperback: 176 pages.

Book 2 of 5 in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Series. Alan Moore is perhaps the most acclaimed writer in the graphic story medium, having garnered countless awards for works such as Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Swamp Thing and Miracleman

Book 2 of 5 in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Series.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Black Dossier is a 2007 graphic novel, the third overall book in the comic book series The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, by Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill. According to Alan Moore it is "a sort of ingenious sourcebook" which reveals the history of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen universe, spanning over fiction and mythology from centuries back until the mid-20th century.

Comic Book, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Comic Book, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Alan Moore's fondness for old-time forms of pornography also tends to come through, to the point where later volumes can focus just as much, if not more at times, on the sexual exploits of the characters as much as their adventures. In particular, the first volume features characters and settings from Victorian pornographic journal The Pearl, and Black Dossier gives us, among others, a Jane-style Tijuana Bible from the world of Nineteen Eighty-Four and the various exploits (in more than one way) of the eighteenth-century League courtesy of Fanny Hill.

At last, Volumes 1 and 2 of Alan Moore's LEAGU. ore.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic book series written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin O'Neill, which started in 1999  . The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic book series written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin O'Neill, which started in 1999. The series spans two six-issue limited series and a graphic novel from the America's Best Comics imprint of Wildstorm/DC, a third miniseries published by Top Shelf and Knockabout Comics, a spin-off starrin. Book 1. The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1. by Alan Moore. At last, Volumes 1 and 2 of Alan Moore's LEAGU.

Alan Moore is an English writer known primarily for his work in comic books including Watchmen, V for Vendetta . Impossible Territories: An Unofficial Companion to the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen The Black Dossier (MonkeyBrain Books, 2008).

Alan Moore is an English writer known primarily for his work in comic books including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, The Ballad of Halo Jones, Swamp Thing, Batman:The Killing Joke, and From Hell.

Q: Who are the extraordinary "gentlemen" in the league? Q: Is it true that this was Sean Connery's last film?

Renowned adventurer Allan Quatermain leads a team of extraordinary figures with legendary powers to battle the technological terror of a madman known as "The Fantom". This "League" comprises seafarer and inventor Captain Nemo, vampire Mina Harker, an invisible man named Rodney Skinner, American Secret Service Agent Tom Sawyer, the ageless and invincible Dorian Gray, and the dangerous split personality of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Plot Summary Plot Synopsis. Q: Who are the extraordinary "gentlemen" in the league? Q: Is it true that this was Sean Connery's last film?

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen comic book series, by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill, will wrap . I’ve never heard Alan happier

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen comic book series, by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill, will wrap things up with The Tempest in June. I’ve never heard Alan happier. Happy is not a word normally associated with Mr. Moore, who is one of the most prominent writers in comics, known for works that helped usher in a new level of emotional maturity to the medium. Chief among his accomplishments are writing Swamp Thing, a horror title about an elemental creature, and Watchmen, which was drawn by Dave Gibbons, about a group of flawed heroes and a world on the brink of nuclear holocaust.

Features the adventures of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen including Dr. Jekyll, Dracula, Captain Nemo, and Allan Quatermain, set in the Victorian era.

Comments: (7)

Dilmal
Most of Alan Moore's most famous works are a critique of the superhero genre: "V for Vendetta" critiques the British system and an anarchistic response to it, "The Watchmen" critique the American culture of superheroes as liberal visionaries or right-wing vigilantes in the context of the cold war. This continues this critique but by referencing the 19th century literature, both classic and pulp. Indeed, Moore seems to be pointing out that the line there was always thin. In the context of the British Empire, Moore shows that heroes are basically imperialists. Furthermore, in a similar vein to "the Watchmen," most of the characters are much more morally problematic than their literary counterparts. Having a background in 19th century British literature helps: Bram Stoker's "Dracula," Jules Verne's "20,000 Leagues Beneath the Sea," H. Rider Haggard's "King Solomon's Mines," Robert Louis Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" and H. G. Wells' "The Invisible Man" build the context of the main characters, and the personalities do seem rooted in the books. Knowing Ian Flemming's James Bond and Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes' characters help as well. The art is very driven by pulp art as well as Victoriana in general. That said, the empire may not be all it seems and so too the problems of the precursors to comic books. This volume is a fairly straight ahead story as far as Moore is concerned, although the literary references build very quickly. At a surface level, this is not a subtle comic, but it works much more deeply in dialogue with its source material and with culture of superheroes: a genre that Moore seems to work in only to undermine.
Perilanim
Alan Moore finishes the LOEG for now. They find the bad guy, but rather than win, a more powerful character comes along. As you read, it's evident that Moore didn't like Harry Potter.

The first volume in this series was good. It sets up the story, leaving room for sequels in the hunt for Haddo, the Anti Christ. 1969, rather than being much of a sequel was more of a parody of 1960s sexual revolution. 2009 picks the story up again, we get a story largely settled on Orlando, and a conclusion that doesn't make much sense.

Don't get me wrong, this is much better than 1969 in the trilogy of this story. But it still is missing whatever that intangible is that made the first two LOEG story lines so good. For me, I think Allan Moores heroes are just best in the 1900s. But it's Moore so if he releases further stories, I know I'll buy it
Fhois
Alan Moore begins his Century series in 1910, and the League, while not what it once was, is still a powerful organization of the British Government. They investigate murders and a shadowy cult they believe is planning a global catastrophe.

The highlight of 1910 is the coming-of-age tale of Janni Dakkar. Seeing her evolution as a character was a thrill. In addition to her, Moore has written a ton of music into this novel through his side-characters that do a good job of illustrating the themes of the novel, though they can be a bit heavy-handed. And while the literary references have started to get more obscure, they're still fairly recognizable.

The main problem with 1910 is that it's too short. And I don't just mean that as 'I wanted it to go on forever'. I mean it as 'Moore rushes through several plot points too fast for them to be satisfying'.

Like Watchmen and the other League novels, Moore ended this story with a companion piece called 'Minions of the Moon'. This piece provides plenty of interesting back story on the characters, along with it's own worthwhile League Adventure in it's own right. Unfortunately, Moore decided to write it at a Nathaniel Hawthorne level of overly-complicated-and-pretentious writing. Still I wouldn't recommend that you skip it.

All in all, I thought this book was enjoyable and worth the money, but they were downhill afterwards, so if you don't like this one, don't bother with 1969 and 2009.
Endieyab
This graphic novel did not translate very well to e-book, in large part because so many pages contained page-wide cells that could not easily be separated for enlarged viewing. My bifocals were barely up to the task of reading the dialogue ballons.

Yes, I am that old.

Despite that, I enjoyed the book. The story and artwork were good, just painful to view.
Trash
While Moore is clearly at the top of his game with this one, I couldn't give it a complete five stars because some of his references in literature, film and pop culture, became too obscure, even for me. I realized this when I had to go to Wikipedia to unpack everything Moore was writing. In addition, I fully expected the end of the series with Century and yet he leaves the door open for more adventures.
Let me explain why this is a problem.
Alan Moore was very upset with DC comics for continuing his Watchmen series after he was gone. He went on and on about how the failings of comics were that the characters never, truly, have an end to their story arc. Moore wrote all of his comics so there would be an end to their arcs. Yet, here he is, in LXG: Century, leaving the door open for future stories with a small blurb at the end. Sad, Mr. More, Sad.
Now, other than that, this was an excellent story with unexpected poignancy and surprises. I very much liked it. If you love LXG, than you'll love it, too.
The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen download epub
Graphic Novels
Author: Alan Moore
ISBN: 1563896656
Category: Comics & Graphic Novels
Subcategory: Graphic Novels
Language: English
Publisher: Dc Comics; First Edition edition (January 1, 2001)
Pages: 176 pages