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Batman: The Chalice download epub

by Chuck Dixon


Epub Book: 1853 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1578 kb.

The Chalice, by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by John Van Fleet is a promising concept, but ultimately fails by having too many cameos of the rogues gallery and not dealing with Batman's existential ponderings.

The Chalice, by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by John Van Fleet is a promising concept, but ultimately fails by having too many cameos of the rogues gallery and not dealing with Batman's existential ponderings

Charles Dixon (born April 14, 1954) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work on the Marvel Comics character the Punisher and on the DC Comics characters Batman, Nightwing.

Charles Dixon (born April 14, 1954) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work on the Marvel Comics character the Punisher and on the DC Comics characters Batman, Nightwing, and Robin in the 1990s and early 2000s. Chuck Dixon's earliest comics work was writing Evangeline for Comico Comics in 1984 and then for First Comics.

Tedium would be an upgrade for what I felt when reading The Chalice

by. Chuck Dixon (Goodreads Author), John Van Fleet (Illustrator). Tedium would be an upgrade for what I felt when reading The Chalice. No idea why John Van Fleet’s art is so very black (because I’m Batman!) but I was squinting most of I think Chuck Dixon might be the worst Batman writer of all time. If he’s not, he’s definitely in the running. Bruce Wayne discovers that he’s related to one of the Grail Knights (of course he is) and is given the actual Holy Grail by one of his descendants. Ra’s Al-Ghul and some other rogues want it - boring shenanigans ensue.

n this book about faith and duty, Batman learns that not only does his nobility extend deep within his ancestry but also that some things beyond the laws of science. When a mysterious package arrives at Wayne Manor, the Dark Knight Detective discovers that he is a descendant of a Grail Knight from King Arthur's court. Now possessing the Holy Grail itself, Batman must come to terms with the ramifications of its existence while safeguarding the artifact from the denizens of attackers.

The Chalice": After foiling one of Two-Face's escapes from Arkham Asylum, Batman returns to the Batcave with a. .Chuck Dixon dedicates the book to "Father Johns, the only priest at St. Andrew's who read the Sunday funnies from the pulpit

The Chalice": After foiling one of Two-Face's escapes from Arkham Asylum, Batman returns to the Batcave with a gunshot wound in his leg. There, Alfred Pennyworth tends to his wound, though it is be After foiling one of Two-Face's escapes from Arkham Asylum, Batman returns to the Batcave with . Andrew's who read the Sunday funnies from the pulpit. John Van Fleet dedicates the book to "Paige and Grace.

Chuck Dixon began his writing career in 1984 with his then wife, Judith Hunt, on the series Evangeline for .

Chuck Dixon began his writing career in 1984 with his then wife, Judith Hunt, on the series Evangeline for Comico Comics. In 1986 things really picked up steam when he started writing Airboy for Eclipse Comics, while continuing to work at Marvel. During his run on multiple Batman and Punisher titles, Dixon also managed to launch Team 7 at Wildstorm and Prophet at Rob Liefeld’s Extreme Studios.

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Batman: the greatest stories ever told vol. 2. Batman: the joker's last laugh. Catwoman by jim balent book two. Catwoman: the catfile. Claw the unconquered.

A gang of vicious criminals hunts the world over for a cache of hundreds of millions in stolen currency. The second entry in Chuck Dixon's series of Levon Cade thrillers throws the man of many skills into the middle of a billion dollar heist.

Used availability for Chuck Dixon's The Chalice. December 1999 : USA Hardback.

Thomas Wayne's son receives an old box from a strange man, and the contents of the box soon make him the target of villains and mercenaries alike.

Comments: (7)

Uris
Very cool Batman story by Chuck Dixon, who created Bane. Worth reading.
Fesho
Excelente p
Nothing personal
I like Batman. What a book to help with that!
adventure time
The Chalice, by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by John Van Fleet is a promising concept, but ultimately fails by having too many cameos of the rogues gallery and not dealing with Batman's existential ponderings.

While one reviewer mistakingly asserts religion should not be in comics (after all, religion is such an importnat part of peoples lives, it is hard to imagine that these characters should not be developed likewise), I disagree, it is that unlike Miller's Daredevil, where religion is dealt with on a somewhat real level, this comic is more interested in "Indiana Jones" type serial comic action than dealing with real questions with possible answers.

I, however, still found the story enjoyable. Batman learns that he is to protect the Holy Grail (the bloodline obligation story is weak as another reviewer noted) and does his best to do so. The grail heals him when he takes a step in faith after being wounded, and he proposes to Batgirl/Oracle that the grail can restore her as well - she lacks faith and turns down the opprotunity. This should have been fleshed out more and could have been a compelling story - why some take the step toward faith, and others do not.

The artwork is good, but not oustanding or compelling. The story too short, but the ending is outstanding and allows the reader to see Batman for who he is - a man who will never give up, but also one who will submit his ego for the good of all, for he knows his strengths and his limitations.
Bu
What would happen if the Holy Grail somehow ended up in the hands of Gotham's esteemed Dark Knight? Sounds like an interesting concept, right?
It is. It could have been in this book. But with the ball so miserably dropped, a concept with much potential quickly went nowhere.
Basically what the story boils down to is this: Batman is entrusted with the Grail (because he has some kind of "blood duty" to take on the responsibility, an idea that I just can't suspend disbelief enough to accept) and protects it from the myriad of baddies out to steal it for various (and sometimes unexplained) reasons. Batman kicks the collective fanny of said baddies, then secures the Grail in an unexpected (but was it, REALLY?) fashion. Ho hum.
That said, the book has its merits, the biggest one being the dreamy, luscious artwork. If you can be swayed to buy a graphic novel for its art alone, this is definitely one to consider. It also contains one of the hunkiest depictions of Bruce Wayne that I've ever seen (yow!).
In short: a great idea that falls flat amid lots of gorgeous pictures.
Ironfire
Bruce Wayne discovers he is descended from the line of Gawain, and, presto, the Holy Grail comes to Gotham. This is, unsurprisingly, completely outside of DC's normal continuity, which is a real shame, as I'd love to see what happens when the Justice League starts brandishing the Sangraal around.

The Chalice is campy - the scenery-chewing dialogue and irregularly-paced plot infused with a false solemnity that's about six times less grand than Indiana Jones 3.

Fortunately, John Van Fleet's art is simply spectacular - miraculously giving this graphic novel a bit of otherwise-absent depth. As an example of an uneven pairing of art and writing, The Chalice is right up there with Alex Ross and Mark Waid's Kingdom Come.
Brannylv
This is certainly one of the weirder Batman stories I've read. The art is nice and reminds me of Alex Maleev's work, but overall, the story lacks substance and is just kinda dumb.
Batman finds himself in the position of being the protector of the fabled Holy Grail. An intriguing concept, but, as some of the other reviews here state, this graphic novel is ultimately unsatisfying.
While the art is interesting, and there are some nice moments, there's no good resolution to the story, and no real explanation of Batman's ties to the Grail. The ending feels rushed, and with the villains assembled here (including Ra's Al Ghul), this could have been a very strong story.
It's worth a look for the art, if nothing else, but certainly not a "keeper."
Batman: The Chalice download epub
Graphic Novels
Author: Chuck Dixon
ISBN: 156389632X
Category: Comics & Graphic Novels
Subcategory: Graphic Novels
Language: English
Publisher: DC Comics (July 1, 2000)