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The Triumph of Ethernet: Technological Communities and the Battle for the LAN Standard (Innovation and Technology in the World Economy) download epub

by Urs von Burg


Epub Book: 1164 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1159 kb.

Urs von Burg's well-written book. is timely and useful, and not just to business historians.

Urs von Burg's well-written book. Knowledge, Technology, & Policy). This book tells the complete story of the battle between several competing technologies in the late 1970s and early 1980s to become the compatibility standard in one high-tech arena, the LAN (local area network) industry. In the end, a single technology succeeded in dominating the entire industry: Ethernet.

SERIES: Innovation and Technology in the World Economy. The author argues that Ethernet triumphed not because it was better or cheaper, but because of a clever strategy by Ethernet’s corporate sponsors.

Urs von Burg uses the word community in describing the companies that . The Triumph of Ethernet is an unusual book. The first World Wide Web site did not go up until 1990, at CERN where Tim Berners-Lee invented it.

Urs von Burg uses the word community in describing the companies that formed around Ethernet technology, though as he continually mentions there was as much - if not more - competition among community members as there was cooperation; this, and the lack of definition given to community makes his view of the word and its implications somewhat vague - as opposed to books that are entrenched. It deals with a fairly technical topic, but is is not about technology.

This book tells the complete story of the battle between several competing technologies in the late 1970s .

This book tells the complete story of the battle between several competing technologies in the late 1970s and early 1980s to become the compatibility standard in one high-tech arena, the LAN (local area network) industry. The author argues that Ethernet triumphed not because it was better or cheaper, but because of a clever strategy by Ethernet s corporate sponsors.

The Triumph of Ethernet : Technological Communities and the Battle for the LAN Standard. One of the most important elements in the computer revolution has been agreement on technological standards.

Innovation and Technology in the World Economy.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Triumph of Ethernet : Technological Communities and the Battle for the LAN Standard. The Triumph of Ethernet. Innovation and Technology in the World Economy. Stanford University Press.

Von Burg focuses on Ethernet, one of many LAN technologies introduced in the early 1980s . You are not currently authenticated.

Von Burg focuses on Ethernet, one of many LAN technologies introduced in the early 1980s, and seeks to explain how it came to dominate a highly competitive market. Von Burg describes in detail the invention and technical workings of Ethernet and its main rival, token ring; the subsequent efforts by established computer manufacturers and "new economy" start-ups to commercialize LAN systems; and the struggle to establish Ethernet as a standard-both de jure, through standards bodies, and de facto, in the marketplace.

Published August 16, 2001 by Stanford Business Books. Data transmission equipment industry, Ethernet (Local area network system).

Delays in the standards process put at risk the market introduction of the Xerox Star workstation and 3Com's Ethernet LAN . The Triumph of Ethernet: technological communities and the battle for the LAN standard. p. 175. ISBN 0-8047-4094-1.

Delays in the standards process put at risk the market introduction of the Xerox Star workstation and 3Com's Ethernet LAN products. With such business implications in mind, David Liddle (General Manager, Xerox Office Systems) and Metcalfe (3Com) strongly supported a proposal of Fritz Röscheisen (Siemens Private Networks) for an alliance in the emerging office communication market, including Siemens' support for the international standardization of Ethernet (April 10, 1981).

International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 080474095X (pbk. : alk. paper). xx, 300 p. : ill. ;, 24 cm. Title: Innovations and technology in the world economy. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. -287) and index. Rubrics: Ethernet (Local area network system) Data transmission equipment industry.

One of the most important elements in the computer revolution has been agreement on technological standards. The advances in communication allowed by millions of computers connecting over various networks are based on these networks sharing a common language. This book tells the complete story of the battle between several competing technologies in the late 1970s and early 1980s to become the compatibility standard in one high-tech arena, the LAN (local area network) industry. In the end, a single technology succeeded in dominating the entire industry: Ethernet. The author argues that Ethernet triumphed not because it was better or cheaper, but because of a clever strategy by Ethernet’s corporate sponsors. This strategy mandated the building of a large supplier base around the technology in order to compensate for an inability to produce all required components and devices. Within a few years, Ethernet had greatly surpassed its competitors in gaining suppliers, which included specialized start-ups, semiconductor firms, and established computer manufacturers. This supplier advantage proved an invaluable strategic asset. As suppliers developed various price and product advantages that were easily adopted by Ethernet, its competitors were driven out of the market. Key to understanding the importance of a supplier base in the race for standards is the crucial role of a technological community. The book demonstrates how technological communities account not only for critical differences in the standardization strategies of various LAN vendors, but also for the emergence of other important instances of technological competition. For example, the recent rise of Linux and Java can be seen as the result of successful community-driven strategies. The story of the battle for the LAN standard is also a story of the Internet more broadly, and so the book offers unique insights into its dazzling growth, as LANs became important corporate on-ramps to the Internet and several LAN suppliers (such as 3Com) evolved into leading suppliers of Internet technology.

Comments: (5)

Maldarbaq
In The Triumph of Ethernet, Urs von Burg takes the reader through a history of the development of LANs, with particular focus given to the fidelity of standardization theory compared with a case study of the LAN standards battle, from which Ethernet came out as the victorious de-jure and de-facto standard. The addition to standardization theory made by Burg is in the positive role open systems and communities play in driving standards. His thesis insisted that it was due to the community built by proponents of Ethernet and the open standards(IEEE 802) they cooperated in developing that Ethernet was able to beat out proprietary LAN systems and the IBM-backed Token-Ring.

By combing through the same time-periods with a view on different companies, the reader gets a handle of the tactics(short-term) and strategies(long-term) used by the proponents of various LANs in the successes and failures of their essays into the marketplace. This method of telling the story is an excellent way of preventing specifics from becoming too overwhelming for the reader - it does, however, make it difficult to keep track of concurrent events, especially during periods of high activity. Through repetition, the author mostly alleviated confusion, though repetition can be annoying in it's own right.

Urs von Burg uses the word community in describing the companies that formed around Ethernet technology, though as he continually mentions there was as much - if not more - competition among community members as there was cooperation; this, and the lack of definition given to community makes his view of the word and its implications somewhat vague - as opposed to books that are entrenched in theory, The Triumph of Ethernet is overly concerned with events, which though important, take the author's writing/time away from theoretical considerations concerning technological communities; this is made obvious in the final chapter, Implications, which offers few lessons that have not been repeated several times in previous sections.

Despite these negative points, this title offers compelling reasons why open systems/standards which engender communities can be better than proprietary systems at ensuring the success of a technology(though Not always individual firms). Likewise for those interested in the history of computer networking, Urs von Burg's book offers a feast.

Note: Originally(before I read the book), I thought this book was designed to promote the 'how-to' and 'why' aspects of technological communities to a primarily business audience in a fashion similar to Wikinomics. This turned out not to be the case as is indicated by the tone, the depth of the historical analysis, and focus on the success of a technology rather than individual firms.
Jake
I read this book carefully. I think the great strength of this book is that the author carefully compares the predictions of economic theory with the actual outcomes. When the two diverge, he uses the divergence to illuminate shortcomings of the economic model. Some economic studies of standardization issues failed because the authors did not understand either the technology or the market well enough to properly compare actual events with model predictions. I also found the history enjoyable-but then I am a computer nerd not an economist.
This account combines careful datagathering with solid analysis and clear exposition. For anyone who is interested in either (1) the economics of standardization or (2) the history of modern computation, this book rates somewhere on the scale ranging from Must-have to Extremely-desireable.
hulk
The Triumph of Ethernet is an unusual book. It deals with a fairly technical topic, but is is not about technology. Rather it is about how various micro-economic theories fare when used to explain why one type of Local Area Networking (LAN) technology over took all others, and to a lesser degree, why some firms did very well and other firms died.

As someone who has been involved with Ethernet for a few decades, this was a very enjoyable stroll down memory lane, albeit one that offered some hitherto unknown facts. As someone who has participated in various IEEE standardization efforts, it was very revealing about what strategies work and which don't. As someone who is constantly frustrated at how dry most micro-economic discussions are, this was a refreshing commingling of theories and practical observations. Anyone who has ever been in networking will find this book quite interesting.

There are a few flaws. First of all, I wish the author had known more about LAN technology. He missed a great proof point of his major argument about network effects in the fight between HP and 3Com/Grand Junction for the format of 100 Megabit Ethernet. As another reviewer has noted, he gives too short a shrift to the impediments to so called Soderblom patent made for Token Ring. And some times he gets his time frames wrong. In discussing ARPANET, he concludes that it was very important for its impact in the 1960's and 1970's because of the birth of the Internet and the World Wide Web. The first World Wide Web site did not go up until 1990, at CERN where Tim Berners-Lee invented it.

That said, it is rare to find a book that so skillfully mixes economic theory with practical observations of an industry that has changed the way a few billion people work, live, and play. Highly recommended despite its few flaws.
The Triumph of Ethernet: Technological Communities and the Battle for the LAN Standard (Innovation and Technology in the World Economy) download epub
Networking & Cloud Computing
Author: Urs von Burg
ISBN: 080474095X
Category: Computers & Technology
Subcategory: Networking & Cloud Computing
Language: English
Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (August 1, 2002)
Pages: 320 pages