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Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises download epub

by Dean Leffingwell


Epub Book: 1282 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1411 kb.

Dean Leffingwell's book "Scaling Software Agility" fills this gap admirably. Together, Parts I and II of the book provide an overview of software agility and describe seven best practices that can be applied at virtually any scale

Dean Leffingwell's book "Scaling Software Agility" fills this gap admirably. It offers a practical guide to large project issues such as architecture, requirements development, multi-level release planning, and team organization. Leffingwell's book is a necessary guide for large projects and large organizations making the transition to agile development. Together, Parts I and II of the book provide an overview of software agility and describe seven best practices that can be applied at virtually any scale. Each of these practices can directly and immediately improve the productivity and quality outcomes for teams who choose to adopt them.

As I announced in a previous blog entry, the Scaled Agile Framework further elaborates and refines the scaling practices described in my books Agile Software Requirements and Scaling Software Agility, as well as this blog

A Sudden and Sad Loss of a Partner and Friend. As I announced in a previous blog entry, the Scaled Agile Framework further elaborates and refines the scaling practices described in my books Agile Software Requirements and Scaling Software Agility, as well as this blog. Next week, Drew Jemilo will be presenting a webinar introduction to the framework as part of the European Agile Knowledge Hub webinar series. For details, see below.

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In Scaling Software Agility, Dean Leffingwell describes how agile methods can be applied to enterprise-class development. This book is invaluable to software developers, testers and QA personnel, managers and team leads, as well as to executives of software organizations whose objective is to increase the quality and productivity of the software development process but who are faced with all the challenges of developing software on an enterprise scale.

Scaling Software Agility book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Dean Leffingwell is a consultant, entrepreneur, software executive and technical author who provides product strategy, business advisory services and enterprise-level agility coaching to large software enterprises. About the conference. Agile 2009 is an exciting international industry conference that presents the latest techniques, technologies, attitudes and first-hand experience, from both a management and development perspective, for successful Agile software development. Recorded at: Dec 09, 2009. by. Dean Leffingwell. This content is in the Agile topic. Part I provides an overview of the most common and effective agile methods. Part II describes seven best practices of agility that natively scale to the enterprise level.

In Leffingwell's book "Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises", he noted that in traditional development . With agile, progress and job satisfaction are constant, frequent, and in real time," Leffingwell wrote

In Leffingwell's book "Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises", he noted that in traditional development models, problems can be overwhelming and can affect job satisfaction across teams. However, agile promotes breaking down large jobs into smaller pieces, making the tasks much more doable. With agile, progress and job satisfaction are constant, frequent, and in real time," Leffingwell wrote. The next opportunity to show your wares to a customer, peer, or other stakeholder is at most a week or so away.

“Companies have been implementing large agile projects for a number of years, but the ‘stigma’ of ‘agile only works for small projects’ continues to be a frequent barrier for newcomers and a rallying cry for agile critics. What has been missing from the agile literature is a solid, practical book on the specifics of developing large projects in an agile way. Dean Leffingwell’s book Scaling Software Agility fills this gap admirably. It offers a practical guide to large project issues such as architecture, requirements development, multi-level release planning, and team organization. Leffingwell’s book is a necessary guide for large projects and large organizations making the transition to agile development.” –Jim Highsmith, director, Agile Practice, Cutter Consortium, author of Agile Project Management “There’s tension between building software fast and delivering software that lasts, between being ultra-responsive to changes in the market and maintaining a degree of stability. In his latest work, Scaling Software Agility, Dean Leffingwell shows how to achieve a pragmatic balance among these forces. Leffingwell’s observations of the problem, his advice on the solution, and his description of the resulting best practices come from experience: he’s been there, done that, and has seen what’s worked.” –Grady Booch, IBM Fellow

Agile development practices, while still controversial in some circles, offer undeniable benefits: faster time to market, better responsiveness to changing customer requirements, and higher quality. However, agile practices have been defined and recommended primarily to small teams. In Scaling Software Agility, Dean Leffingwell describes how agile methods can be applied to enterprise-class development.

Part I provides an overview of the most common and effective agile methods. Part II describes seven best practices of agility that natively scale to the enterprise level. Part III describes an additional set of seven organizational capabilities that companies can master to achieve the full benefits of software agility on an enterprise scale.

This book is invaluable to software developers, testers and QA personnel, managers and team leads, as well as to executives of software organizations whose objective is to increase the quality and productivity of the software development process but who are faced with all the challenges of developing software on an enterprise scale.

Foreword Preface Acknowledgments About the Author Part I: Overview of Software Agility Chapter 1: Introduction to Agile Methods Chapter 2: Why the Waterfall Model Doesn’t Work Chapter 3: The Essence of XP Chapter 4: The Essence of Scrum Chapter 5: The Essence of RUP Chapter 6: Lean Software, DSDM, and FDD Chapter 7: The Essence of Agile Chapter 8: The Challenge of Scaling Agile Part II: Seven Agile Team Practices That Scale Chapter 9: The Define/Build/Test Component Team Chapter 10: Two Levels of Planning and Tracking Chapter 11: Mastering the Iteration Chapter 12: Smaller, More Frequent Releases Chapter 13: Concurrent Testing Chapter 14: Continuous Integration Chapter 15: Regular Reflection and Adaptation Part III: Creating the Agile Enterprise Chapter 16: Intentional Architecture Chapter 17: Lean Requirements at Scale: Vision, Roadmap, and Just-in-Time Elaboration Chapter 18: Systems of Systems and the Agile Release Train Chapter 19: Managing Highly Distributed Development Chapter 20: Impact on Customers and Operations Chapter 21: Changing the Organization Chapter 22: Measuring Business Performance Conclusion: Agility Works at Scale Bibliography Index


Comments: (7)

Thofyn
One would think a book with 'Scaling' in the title would actually have some good advice on how to scale agile into a larger enterprise environment, but this book is very light on that type of detail.

I expected to read a book that would help me take small-team agile concepts and make them successful in a larger product/organization environment. I expected help in answering questions such as:

- How do you handle estimating features when you have multiple teams working together with different velocity scales?
- How do you handle release planning with multiple teams and different velocities?
- How do you handle release planning when you have potentially one product owner supporting many teams? Do they all plan together?
- How do you handle situations where teams are NOT self-regulating as would be expected? As you scale up you are likely to have low-performer situations on teams - how do you encourage the team to work through these issues?
- How do you handle metrics in a multiple-team situation?

This is the type of stuff that a book with 'scale' and 'enterprise' in the title would lead me to believe would be answered. But none of this stuff is in there! The index in the back has no mention of 'velocity' at all. 'Estimating' has two short entries, neither of which discusses variance between teams, or actual release planning practices, etc. The release planning section is a rehash of general release planning concepts for agile - not much meat that actually discusses how to pull this off on extremely large teams...

Overall, I'm sure there is some meat in the book, but it's disappointing that it doesn't seem to help answer the 101-level questions that any organization that is trying to ramp up from one team to multiple teams in agile would encounter...
Zehaffy
I've long been switching between 3 or 4 stars rating for this book. So let me start by saying that my 3 starts means that the book is really worth reading, however some parts of the book do not go deep enough, in my opinion.

Scaling Software Agility tackles the question "How to do agile development in large systems". The experience in the book seems to mainly be build on one project in BMC. In the first part of the book, Dean goes over the most popular agile methods and gived a quick introduction. He then attempts to extract common parts for the methods. In part two he picks out 7 practices and claims that they scale without modification. In the last part of the book, he adds 7 new practices, which, in his opinion, are needed for large agile projects.

Personally I've been working with a lot of large agile projects and thus was very interested in this book, especially to learn new things or see if Dean had similar problems. I was slightly dissapointed, but let me explain.

One of the fundamental points in the book is that agile development can be executed on team level. The unit of work is what Dean calls "component teams". In his book, he does not cover the question of code ownership, but the component team organization suggests a traditional organization based on the architecture of the system. This is confirmed by the problems he mentions, which are inherent to component teams. These are the need for more architecture, the need for much dependency management between the component teams and several others. Dean keeps with the traditional methods of organizing projects, he doesn't question it. The component teams thus lose part of the end-customer focus and more management and architecture is needed. Slowly parts of waterfall development are re-emerging. The book does NOT cover the organization around feature teams and the scaling of practices like shared code ownership. Also it doesn't talk about continuous integration in relationship to the team structure etc. A missed opportunity.

In part two, Dean describes 7 practices which scale without adjustment. I totally agree that these practices scale, but there is some need for doing them slightly different. As example, "how do we coordinate the different planning meetings?" The book explains the traditional practice but does NOT talk about how to actually scale it. It doesn't mention different problems that might happen and different possible solutions. It seems to just cover the surface of the subject.

The last chapters about how agile development will influence the rest of the organization were good. They touch a subject that is currently rarely covered.

In conclusion, a useful book to read. I would not follow all recommendations and more needs to be written on the subject. Still, definitively worth reading.
Dammy
This book explains in depth the history and mechanics of agile software development, and introduces practices that large IT and product development organizations can use to adapt them to large, complex development efforts. The language, diagrams and examples are clear and convincing. An update of this 2007 edition that took the ubiquity of cloud-based environments into account would merit a fifth star. The cloud can only increase the opportunity and rewards for cloud-based development and delivery. Everything the book says is still completely relevant, though.
Mr.Twister
I find that one of the challenges in large organizations is getting lots of people with lots of different backgrounds to the same place. There were two things I especially appreciated about this book; It is a fast read. Busy people tend not to dive into something that will take a big time investment.;It really helped establish a shared vocabulary and shared understanding of key concepts in a large organization. It helped us break gridlock in places where we have been trying to apply agile to large projects.
Marr
Good book. Provides some answers for scaling Agile at enterprise level. It will have better buy-in in the "market" primarily because the framework kind of defines the responsibilities of the people who are leadership and strategic positions rather than merely just talking about employee empowerment. Coincedently the same people who are in startegic positions for the org. are the same people who will have to decide on taking the Agile route :) and SAFe is a SAFE bet where their role is not cut down or at least that is the perception.
Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises download epub
Programming
Author: Dean Leffingwell
ISBN: 0321458192
Category: Computers & Technology
Subcategory: Programming
Language: English
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (March 8, 2007)
Pages: 384 pages