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Sams Teach Yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 Days, Complete Compiler Edition download epub

by Davis Chapman


Epub Book: 1374 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1171 kb.

Visual C++. ®. 6. in 21 Days vi Sams Teach Yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 Days.

Visual C++. in 21 Days. A Division of Macmillan Computer Publishing 201 West 103rd S. Indianapolis, Indiana, 46290 USA. Sams Teach Yourself Visual C++. 6 in 21 Days. Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as possible, but no warranty or fitness is implied. The information provided is on an as is basis. vi Sams Teach Yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 Days. 30 Attaching Variables to Your Controls. 32 Attaching Functionality to the Controls.

Sams Teach Yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 Days. ISBN13: 9780672312403. More Books . ABOUT CHEGG.

I read through this after being pleased with the Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days book. I learned how to use the Microsoft Visual C++ software, and I use it as a reference regularly. I would recommend this to someone who already has a working knowledge of C++ and who would like to learn how to use the Microsoft Visual Studio/C++ software. Ideas in the book can easily be applied to Microsoft Visual Basic or any of the Microsoft Visual compiler software releases. Categories: Education\self-help books.

Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as possible, but no warranty or fitness is implied. His recent book titles include Visual Basic. NET Programming With Peter Aitken, Office XP Development With VBA, XML the Microsoft Way, Windows Script Host, and Sams Teach Yourself Visual Basic. NET Internet Programming in 21 Days.

For the majority of C++ programmers, the pace and style of David Chapman's Teach Yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 Days .

For the majority of C++ programmers, the pace and style of David Chapman's Teach Yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 Days will make a good deal of sense. After finishing Visual C++ 6 in 21 days, I had an excellent start and began writing programs much faster than my co-workers did. A great book worth picking up!! Not as bad as others make it out to be. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 18 years ago. Maybe if people would bother to read a preface they would understand the layout of the book. Most of the "missing" material is in the back of the book in the "C++ Overview" section. the last 600 PAGES!!! The blue ones.

Yourself MySQL in 21 Days, On Day 1, you'll learn what MySQL is and some of its uses. 800 East 96th Street.

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Users will learn Visual C++ through the elements of the Teach Yourself series: Q. .I got through it in twenty-nine days.

Users will learn Visual C++ through the elements of the Teach Yourself series: Q&A sections Do s and Don ts sections Workshop sections Shaded syntax boxes icons Week One gets users started with Visual C+. Not too shabby, considering there are weekends in there and I went through it at work.

Davis Chapman, Michael Anderson, Sam Publishing Staff. Learn Visual C++ through the Teach Yourself series, with sections on: Q&A, Do's and Don'ts, Workshop, Shaded syntax boxes, icons.

Visual C++ is the programming language of choice for serious programmers. When easier programming languages like Visual Basic just won't get the job done, developers turn to Visual C++. This boxed set includes one of the industry's best-selling tutorial-based books, Sams Teach Yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 Days, as well as the complete learning edition of Microsoft Visual C++ 6. This combination of book and compiler is a must-have for people looking to learn Visual C++.

Comments: (7)

Legend 33
I was using Visual C++ before I bought this book. I am glad I got it because it included stuff that I could not find easily without the help of this book.
Xtani
I read through this after being pleased with the Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days book. I learned how to use the Microsoft Visual C++ software, and I use it as a reference regularly. I would recommend this to someone who already has a working knowledge of C++ and who would like to learn how to use the Microsoft Visual Studio/C++ software. Ideas in the book can easily be applied to Microsoft Visual Basic or any of the Microsoft Visual compiler software releases.
Xlisiahal
This book gets you to a point where you have some visual programs, but that's about all. there is very little info about the MFC class members in there. For more examples on MFC, I recommend "Programming windows with MFC" by Jeff Prosise.
Anarahuginn
very useful; a good start
Negal
This book does not teach C++ directly, nor does it really get under the hood in MFC. I have a large ammount of experience with C++, and have read some books on MFC as well; with this background, this book served me rather well as a handbook on how to perform routine stuff. Those who are uncomplimentary of this book seem fall into one of two catagories: Those who don't know C++ or MFC and expect one book to quickly teach them both (not possible), and those who understand C++ but want an in depth book on MFC. If you don't understand C++, this book will frustrate you to no end; read a C++ language book first. If you are interested in MFC, then buy a book on MFC. If you already know C++ and are familiar with MFC from a "big picture" perspective, but you want to learn how to use the VC environment and to apply some MFC and such, then this book is not so bad. Errors in the example code prevent this book from getting five stars. All in all, it's a good book, but with a fairly narrow purpose.
huckman
For those programming in C++, Microsoft Visual Studio can be both a blessing and a curse. There are many instances in program and project development where the package can be very helpful and save hours in development time. This is usually the case for commercial applications. For technical or scientific applications written in C++ though, Visual Studio can be very painful, as it does given the developer a view of what is going on behind the scenes. Individuals who are doing scientific applications usually want to have control of most of code, and so templating and the Application Wizard can be more of an annoyance rather than of help. For this reason, scientific programmers will probably not want to read this book at all. But frequently these days, scientific programmers are involved in developing applications in areas such as finance and bioinformatics, and so a study of this book would then be appropriate. Readers of the book are expected to have a thorough knowledge of C++, but the author gives a short (36 page) review in an appendix to the book for those who need such a review.
For readers who are writing Windows applications using Visual C++, the author has done a pretty good job of overviewing how to develop with Visual Studio. He begins with the simplest features of Visual Studio, and builds up to more advanced features, to the extent possible in Visual Studio. Some features of Visual Studio are so entrenched at all levels of the package that it is difficult to separate them out, being themselves advanced features, at early stages in the book. This is readily apparent in the author's use of the "WinExec' function instead of the "CreateProcess" function, since the latter is deemed to complicated for the beginning reader. The Class Wizard and AppWizard are brought in early on, no doubt to encourage the reader to become adept at using them as soon as possible. The major goal of the book then is to get the reader to create a Windows application as soon as possible.
Some helpful and useful discussions in the book include: 1. The Q&A section at the end of the chapter, wherein the author attempts to anticipate a typical reader's questions after they have finished the chapter. 2. The review sections at the end of each week, detailing to readers just what they are expected to know before moving on. 3. Binary attribute flags, for memory-senstive applications that need window and control capabilities. 4. The creation of custom dialog windows; the author is very detailed here and he also shows the role of the MFC class library in creating these. 5. ActiveX controls are introduced fairly early, and this is good considering their importance and pervasiveness in current applications. 6. How to make application objects serializable using the CArchive class and Serialize function. Performance and legacy issues with serialization dictate that particular attention be made to this discussion. 7. Database access and updating. Performance issues involved in database access again make this discussion mandatory reading for those who are involved in these kinds of applications, particularly for database applications that are used in a client/server configuration with a database server that is accessed over a wide-area network. The author does not discuss these issues unfortunately, but ADO, which is used to build a database application in the book, has had performance problems in the past. 8. The creation of library modules and dynamic link libraries. For creating software for scientific purposes where classes should be used from one application to another, this discussion is particularly appropriate. The author also spends a small amount of time on how to create test applications to test these modules. In addition, he shows how to convert a regular DLL so that it can be used by applications not created with Visual Studio. The author mentions that in the design of DLLs one must insure that they be "threadsafe". Multithreading in C++ however is not a subject that is usually encountered in a course on C++, so this inclusion may cause difficulty for some readers. This is alleviated somewhat in a later discussion on threads. 9. How to add multitasking to applications. Multithreading again makes its appearance here, but in this case the author spends more time on explaining the origin and need for it. The author details a fun example of multithreading that involves four spinning color wheels. 10. The discussion on creating Internet applications. Although the author does not dicuss performance issues in creating these, he does give some basic background on how actually to program them.
Cordanara
I found this book to skim the surface of win32 C++ development very well. Let's read that again... the SURFACE of win32 C++ development. I think that most folks take the standpoint that 21 days books don't delve into things deep enough. I agree, but they aren't designed that way either. At today's book costs I read every review I can find b4 I buy. Let's read the author's above comment again. He states that this is a good primer for many of the concepts of win32 C++ programming, with hints of moving on to other books for more depth. I second that. Heck, I even felt when moving into ActiveX the author gave a very good short primer on some complicated technology. "working programmers" may indeed like the fast pace of the text as well as those wishing only to learn the newer features. The book concentrates heavily on the tools available in the environment. I myself wish to know as much as I can about what is going on. I realized quickly that if I was serious about my C++ that a 21 days book wasn't going to do it. No one book will. But for a good intro to applying C++ to windows programming, you could do worse. The first thing I did was pick up my old C programming book from college and bone up on some of the finer points and then I ordered Stroustrups' book. I plan on coming back to this book when I want a good primer on VC++.
Sams Teach Yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 Days, Complete Compiler Edition download epub
Programming
Author: Davis Chapman
ISBN: 0672314037
Category: Computers & Technology
Subcategory: Programming
Language: English
Publisher: Sams (October 14, 1998)
Pages: 800 pages