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Flexible Rails: Flex 3 on Rails 2 download epub

by Peter Armstrong


Epub Book: 1512 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1910 kb.

This is a great book to learn Flex, because you get to see a complete application. I used it to connect Flex with Grails instead of Rails. If this works well, I can use it instead of Grails or Rails on the server side.

This is a great book to learn Flex, because you get to see a complete application. I also used it to learn Cairngorm. I also learned how to send requests via ActionScript instead of MXML. Not part of the book: I am now learning how to connect Flex to Blazeds and Java JPA/Hibernate objects

Flexible Rails is a unique, application-based guide for using Ruby on Rails 2 and Adobe Flex 3 to build rich . Peter Armstrong is a professional developer who has been working with Flex full-time since July 2004 and Ruby on Rails since mid-2005-that's before Rails .

Flexible Rails is a unique, application-based guide for using Ruby on Rails 2 and Adobe Flex 3 to build rich Internet applications (RIAs). It is not an exhaustive Ruby on Rails or Flex reference. His background includes five years of working with Java Swing and a brief stint with PHP during the dotcom bubble in 2000.

Flex 3 on Rails 2. Peter Armstrong

Flex 3 on Rails 2. Peter Armstrong. Flexible Rails is a book about how to use Ruby on Rails and Adobe Flex to build next-generation rich Internet applications (RIAs). Peter is also a frequent speaker on using Flex and Rails together, including presentations at The Vancouver Flash/Flex Meetup, a RailsConf 2007 BOF, The Vancouver RIA Developer Camp and Rails to Italy in Pisa. Peter lives in the Vancouver, BC area and works as a Flex/AIR/Flash developer, writer (ww. lexiblerails. com) and independent consultant (ww. uboss.

Peter has continually delivered Flexible Rails, keeping up to date with Flex 3 and Rails 2 and working with Cairngorm .

Peter has continually delivered Flexible Rails, keeping up to date with Flex 3 and Rails 2 and working with Cairngorm (the Flex MVC framework), and he’s at the cutting edge with RubyAMF. Peter’s book delivers tutorial after tutorial, leading us. xvii. Instead, it is an extensive tutorial in which the reader builds multiple iterations of an interesting RIA using Flex and Rails together.

Items related to Flexible Rails: Flex 3 on Rails . The book unfolds both the application and the Flex-on-Rails approach side-by-side.

Items related to Flexible Rails: Flex 3 on Rails 2. Peter Armstrong Flexible Rails: Flex 3 on Rails 2. ISBN 13: 9781933988504. Purchase of the print book comes with an offer of a free PDF, ePub, and Kindle eBook from Manning.

Flexible Rails is a unique, application-based guide for using Ruby on Rails 2 and Adobe Flex 3 to build rich Internet . Author Peter Armstrong walks readers through eleven iterations in which the sample s variously built, refactored, debugged, sliced, diced and otherwise explored from every conceivable angle with respect to Ruby on Rails and Adobe Flex.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Flexible Rails: Flex 3 on Rails 2. 9 Mb. Hello! Flex 4.

Source code for Hello Flex book. The source code from Enterprise Flexible Rails. The RESTful way to develop Adobe Flex and AIR applications. RestfulX Framework Code Generation Engine, Rails . + Integration Support. 8. 4. enterprise flexible rails.

Flexible Rails is a unique, application-based guide for using Ruby on Rails 2 and Adobe Flex 3 to build rich Internet applications (RIAs). It is not an exhaustive Ruby on Rails or Flex reference. Instead, it is an extensive tutorial in which the reader builds multiple iterations of an interesting RIA using Flex and Rails together.

Author Peter Armstrong walks readers through eleven iterations in which the sample application—pomodo—is variously built, refactored, debugged, sliced, diced and otherwise explored from every conceivable angle with respect to Ruby on Rails and Adobe Flex. The book unfolds both the application and the Flex-on-Rails approach side-by-side.

Purchase of the print book comes with an offer of a free PDF, ePub, and Kindle eBook from Manning. Also available is all code from the book.


Comments: (7)

Asher
The author goes into great detail on how to efficiently get Rails and Flex working together. The book is updated for the latest version of Rails as well as the upcoming Flex 3 release. I've found the book easy to follow along with and enjoy the author's humor spread throughout the book.

As a developer I'm often tasked with making "things talk to each other". Typically if I can I'll use a tool like Flex Builder for a project and if I have a choice I'll pick Java, .NET or Ruby for the server back end - whatever is the best fit. This book only backed up my belief that Rails and Flex really do work very well together. I've learned a lot going through the code both on Rails and Flex.

I also liked how the author is continually refactoring the application (called "Pomodo"), that is where your learning kicks into overdrive. He uses the Cairngorm framework and even RubyAMF. I didn't have any experience in either up until this point. Now I can say I do and it all fits together nicely.
Yozshunris
I have used Flex for about a year and I have only dabbled in Ruby/Rails development. I have been curious how I might back a Flex front end with a simple service layer that isn't hard to create, maintain or host. So far I have only worked with Java/Spring/Hibernate backend services which can take a little while to build and integrate (Grails is MUCH faster).

After about 100 pages I'm in interation 4 building an interesting RIA with a Rails backend that I can host on relatively inexpensive server if I wanted to. My only struggles thus far was getting MySQL going properly. But that was only because I forgot a step in installing it.

If you have little exposure to Rails and/or Flex and you feel at home on the command line as well as you do in an IDE like Eclipse, this is a great "project" book for you. I'd say you probably want a primer in Ruby, Rails and Flex before you get going but it is pretty easy follow and has a lot of free professional advice from someone that has obviously been around the block a few times. Peter is very upfront about some things that he has done in the book that should not be considered "best practice".

I am hoping to get some good insight how I might do something similar for Flex and Grails. Regardless, I am confident this is going to be a fun journey!
Purestone
This is a great book to learn Flex, because you get to see a complete application. I used it to connect Flex with Grails instead of Rails. It helps to know a little Flex before you use this book, but it was one of the first books I used to learn Flex, and I am still using it. For example, I used it to see how to handle XML data and error messages sent back from the server. I also used it to learn Cairngorm. I also learned how to send requests via ActionScript instead of MXML. Not part of the book: I am now learning how to connect Flex to Blazeds and Java JPA/Hibernate objects. If this works well, I can use it instead of Grails or Rails on the server side.
Enila
Good book, would buy again.
Buzalas
The humour in this book is annoying to the point of distraction.

There appear to be lots of hacks and work-arounds for Rails, leaving me with the feeling that I would not touch Rails with a barge pole. An updated edition with Flex 4 and less humour would be warranted.
Skrimpak
Whenever a new technology that interests me hits the streets, I buy everything that gets published (well, almost everything). I have six or eight books on ActionScript 3 and Flex 2 and 3, most of which are very good. I also have an embarrassingly large collection of Ruby and Rails books. I haven't written a review for any of them, simply because they are just 'good' books. But this book is phenomenal! It knits together best practices of Flex development seamlessly with best practices in Rails, demonstrates a solid client-side architecture and ties it to a RESTful Rails architecture. It shows how to do validation and error handling on both the server and client sides. It contrasts different Flex event-driven architectures and shows how to map each to the server side api. It fills in all of the gaps that I puzzled over when trying to integrate Flex and Rails in a single development and runtime environment over the past year.

There is a lot of code in the book ... it is basically an extensive tutorial. The application developed in the book has the feel of a real and sufficiently complex project. What is truly amazing is that ALL OF THE CODE WORKS! In fact, I have found only one typo in the entire book. Caveat: I am only two-thirds of the way through, but I have seen enough to be blown away. This is what good written training ought to be. Well done, Peter Armstrong and Manning!

The combination of Rails on the server and Flex on the client is a beautiful thing. It is incredibly fun and satisfying to work with. Although you will probably have the most fun if you have already done some RESTful Rails and some Flex programming, the experience is not strictly a prerequisite. Get it and go!

The opening iterations (chapters) develop a standard Flex client-side application architecture. It is the architecture that I found in my other Flex books. Latter parts of the book show a refactoring of the 'standard' architecture to a Cairngorm-style MVC architecture. This results in a much more manageable and extensible application architecture. Then it shows a refactoring to use ActionScript objects appropriately in lieu of XML on the client. Next, it shows how to the RubyAMF Flash Remoting gateway for communications between Flex and Rails. Finally, it refactors the client code to run in AIR (Adobe Integrated Runtime), a cross-platform standalone client-side environment.

If you are a beginner to Flex get 'Adobe Flex 2: Training from the Source' by Tapper et al (pre-orderable in Flex 3 version)

If you want to see deep into Flex and its capabilities, especially when tied to a Java server, get
'Rich Internet Applications with Adobe Flex & Java (Secrets of the Masters)' by Yakov et al

But if you are into Rails and want the best tutorial on Flex and Rails, this is it!
Flexible Rails: Flex 3 on Rails 2 download epub
Programming
Author: Peter Armstrong
ISBN: 1933988509
Category: Computers & Technology
Subcategory: Programming
Language: English
Publisher: Manning Publications (February 2, 2008)
Pages: 592 pages