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Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day download epub

by Peter Reinhart


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delicious, fresh, yeast breads:, Step One – mix and knead the dough, then let it rest for 1-2 days w. .Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day: Fast and Easy Recipes for World-Class Breads.

delicious, fresh, yeast breads:, Step One – mix and knead the dough, then let it rest for 1-2 days w. 36 MB·189 Downloads·New! From Publishers WeeklyWith "no-knead" bread recipes all the rage now, expert baker Reinhart ( Wh. Baking Sourdough Bread Dozens of Recipes for Artisan Loaves, Crackers, and Sweet Breads. 27 MB·5,762 Downloads·New! to be a magician to craft beautiful, tasty loaves from it. Baking sourdough bread is an art for everyone.

Recently when I brought home Peter Reinhart’s Artisan Breads Every Day, it didn’t take long for her to find the pictures of plump raisin .

Recently when I brought home Peter Reinhart’s Artisan Breads Every Day, it didn’t take long for her to find the pictures of plump raisin bagels being lowered into their vat of simmering liquid, and so we dove straight i. We’ve talked about Peter Reinhart before; his book The Bread Bakers’ Apprentice, a thick textbook-style volume is a brilliant resource for all things bread, and it’s recipe for Napoletana Pizza Dough is renowned. Reinhart’s latest title is even easier to digest (and to peruse on the subway).

Reinhart begins with the simplest French bread, then moves on to familiar classics such as ciabatta, pizza dough, and soft sandwich loaves, and Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day distills the renowned baking.

Reinhart begins with the simplest French bread, then moves on to familiar classics such as ciabatta, pizza dough, and soft sandwich loaves, and Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day distills the renowned baking instructor' s professional techniques down to the basics, delivering artisan bread recipes that anyone with flour and a fridge can make and bake with ease

Reinhart begins with the simplest French bread, then moves on to familiar classics such as ciabatta, pizza dough, and soft .

Reinhart begins with the simplest French bread, then moves on to familiar classics such as ciabatta, pizza dough, and soft sandwich loaves, and concludes with fresh specialty items like pretzels, crackers, croissants, and bagels.

Richard Bertinet making bread (DVD from the book DOUGH) - Продолжительность: 21:30 kevin . 25 Phrases Every English Intermediate Learner Must-Know - Продолжительность: 23:42 Learn English with EnglishClass101. com Recommended for you. 23:42.

25 Phrases Every English Intermediate Learner Must-Know - Продолжительность: 23:42 Learn English with EnglishClass101. IELTS Speaking Example Arabic Learner Score . - Продолжительность: 12:30 GeneralIELTSHelp Recommended for you.

Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads each day distills the famend baking trainer's expert strategies all the way down to the basics, handing . I started my bread making adventure with the original 'Artisan bread in five minutes a day' book

Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads each day distills the famend baking trainer's expert strategies all the way down to the basics, handing over artisan bread recipes that everyone with flour and a fridge can make and bake without problems. I started my bread making adventure with the original 'Artisan bread in five minutes a day' book. That was a nice start, but for a perfectionist like me, it wasn't satisfying in the long run. I soon figured out that there was no way I could make a loaf of bread with dough that has been stored in the fridge for 2 weeks. I was never able to create a loaf of bread that came with both, oven spring and a nice tangy sour dough flavor.

Reinhart begins with the simplest French bread, then moves on to familiar classics such as ciabatta, pizza dough, and soft sandwich . Each recipe is broken into "Do Ahead" and "On Baking Day" sections, making every step-from preparation through pulling pans from the oven-a breeze, whether you bought your loaf pan yesterday or decades ago. These doughs are engineered to work flawlessly for busy home bakers: most require only a straightforward mixing and overnight fermentation.

Peter Reinhart’s thoughtful, steadying presence combined with his matchless teaching skills and down-to-earth approach make reading and using Artisan Breads Every Day a great pleasure. His information demystifying the preparation and use of sourdough starters is both much needed and superb. -Nancy Baggett, author of Kneadlessly Simple: Fabulous, Fuss-Free, No-Knead Breads. For most cooks, artisan bread baking is close to metaphysics. And each succeeding book about it only tends to deepen the mysteries and make trying it even more unlikely.

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Master baker and innovator Peter Reinhart’s answer to the ime revolution, with time-saving . I believe what readers of this book really want to learn is how to make world-class breads quickly and easily

Master baker and innovator Peter Reinhart’s answer to the ime revolution, with time-saving techniques for making extraordinary loaves with speed and ease. I believe what readers of this book really want to learn is how to make world-class breads quickly and easily. To accomplish this, we need only look at the discoveries and breakthroughs of recent years. So here’s a quick recap: The three waves that led to improved bread in the United States can be identi ed as the whole grain wave, the traditional wave, and the neo-traditional wave.

The renowned baking instructor distills professional techniques down to the basics, delivering artisan bread recipes that anyone with flour and a fridge can bake with ease. Reinhart begins with the simplest French bread, then moves on to familiar classics such as ciabatta, pizza dough, and soft sandwich loaves, and concludes with fresh specialty items like pretzels, crackers, croissants, and bagels. Each recipe is broken into "Do Ahead" and "On Baking Day" sections, making every step—from preparation through pulling pans from the oven—a breeze, whether you bought your loaf pan yesterday or decades ago. These doughs are engineered to work flawlessly for busy home bakers: most require only a straightforward mixing and overnight fermentation. The result is reliably superior flavor and texture on par with loaves from world-class artisan bakeries, all with little hands-on time. America's favorite baking instructor and innovator Peter Reinhart offers time-saving techniques accompanied by full-color, step-by-step photos throughout so that in no time you'll be producing fresh batches of Sourdough Baguettes, 50% and 100% Whole Wheat Sandwich Loaves, Soft and Crusty Cheese Bread, English Muffins, Cinnamon Buns, Panettone, Hoagie Rolls, Chocolate Cinnamon Babka, Fruit-Filled Thumbprint Rolls, Danish, and Best-Ever Biscuits.  Best of all, these high-caliber doughs improve with a longer stay in the fridge, so you can mix once, then portion, proof, and bake whenever you feel like enjoying a piping hot treat.

Comments: (7)

Musical Aura Island
First things first. I have been baking bread and pizzas for more than 30 years, and within a few days of receiving this book, I learned a few things and saw some improvements. Since baking better bread is the only purpose of this book, it ranks as a success.

I'd say the book is ideal for either beginners or "experts" like me, as long as you are willing to throw away (or at least forget for a while) everything you know about baking bread. In my years of baking, I learned that you can't freeze dough, yeast likes warm places, and the longer you knead dough, the better. Reinhart has a different opinion, and he seems to be correct.

The Good Points

* So far I have made baguettes, sourdough and pizza using recipes and techniques in the book. All turned out excellent. I can now bake "crusty" baguettes on demand, and can produce that micro-thin, slightly stretchy pizza crust in a kitchen 3000 miles from New York (although with slight additions to Peter's recipe).

* I always "knew" you couldn't freeze dough, but following Peter's advice, I now regularly freeze dough for pizza, and it turns out great. Combined with premeasured bags of frozen sauce, fresh hot pizza is now a "freezer" item. Awesome, except for my diet.

* I learned new techniques for working with dough, and for the most part they seem to work great. The book organizes the basic dough techniques (stretching, proofing, etc) in one section at the front of the book so you can find them easily. (More on this below).

* Subject to some issues described below, the instructions are reasonably easy to follow. They are written in easy-to-understand terms, and Peter avoids the usual pedantic language often found in higher-end cookbooks. Nothing worse than needing a dictionary and a translator to make soup.

* Reinhart doesn't try to convince you that you need to go out and buy $1000 worth of proofing pans, proofing boxes, special cloths, etc. Just use what is in your house already.

The Bad Points (Note first paragraph in review)

* The directions can get a bit carried away with themselves. Personally, quantities like 3 3/8 teaspoons of salt drive me nuts. I might breakdown and use an actual measuring spoon instead of a teaspoon, but there is no way I am not going to eyeball the last half teaspoon.

* The directions are written in a narrative format rather than a list of items typical in recipes. As a result I will often end up re-reading the whole recipe numerous times just to find the next step. This can be a bit of a pain, because many of the recipes have quite a few steps. Typical will be mix for 2 minutes on low, wait 5 minutes, switch to a dough hook, mix for 3 minutes on medium, wait 5 minutes, fold and stretch dough, wait for 10 minutes in an uncovered bowl, stretch again.... You get the idea. For every step, you will end up re-reading most of the recipe. A little indenting/change of fonts/highlighting/bold/etc in the layout would do wonders for the book.

* The directions can get overly detailed, but yet unclear-forcing you to interpret multiple directions to be sure you know exactly what Reinhart meant. Not a real big deal, but something one more round of proofreading should have caught.

* Basic techniques such as kneading and proofing are in a separate section of the book, and then referred to by individual recipes. Except when they are not-some recipes include the details, some refer you to the front of the book. Since the directions are already somewhat bloated and poorly formatted, I'd prefer to just have references to a single section.

* At least one of the recipes (sourdough mother starter) has all the quantities in cups, until you get to the final steps when everything is now in grams. I don't have a metric (or even English) scale in my kitchen.

* Some of the steps are explained in agonizing detail, and them some are skipped over. It takes 5 pages to explain how to make the sourdough starter, but then the "how to refresh the starter dough process" is skipped over. List the quantities of old starter, flour and water (see above), but then makes no mention of what to do with it- proof at room temp? immediately return to the refrigerator? How long does it need to refresh?

* Mom always taught me that you can't really measure flour-you have to add it to the dough as needed. The reason for this is that flour can have a vastly different moisture content, so what works once might yield overly tacky/dry dough the next time. Reinhart doesn't seem to subscribe to this theory, at least not in all his recipes. After mixing up a batch of the gooiest pizza dough on the planet, I'd say Mom was right.

* Some of the baking times listed are suspect. I suspect they are worse case time for very large loafs, not typical times for baguette sized creations. Caveat baker.

* None of the recipes I have tried so far are for anyone in a hurry. Every recipe so far has taken days to complete. Not a negative...yeast will be yeast. Just something to be aware of.

Overall:

A great guide to breadbaking-both for specific recipes and learning to update your artisan skills. I learned a lot from it, and have made a number of items, all of them unqualified successes. If you are looking to whip up a batch of bread as quickly as your bread machine, this is not your book. If you want to spend a few days working with yeast to get a baguette worthy of Paris (OK, maybe New York), this is your book.
Winn
I started my bread making adventure with the original 'Artisan bread in five minutes a day' book. That was a nice start, but for a perfectionist like me, it wasn't satisfying in the long run. I soon figured out that there was no way I could make a loaf of bread with dough that has been stored in the fridge for 2 weeks. I was never able to create a loaf of bread that came with both, oven spring and a nice tangy sour dough flavor. At best I got one of the two (a somewhat decent oven spring with new fresh dough, and better flavor with older dough), but never both.

I soon figured out that dough older than 4 days doesn't hold any shape, and is best used as a pre-ferment mixed in a new batch.

And I don't like volume measurements! I grew up with a cheap scale, simply dumping the ingredients into a mixing bowl on the scale, taring between measurements - so much faster and easier, and more precise, but not if the recipe doesn't come with weight measurements.

I finally 'upgraded' to Peter Reinharts 'Artisan Bread Every Day' book, and have been much happier ever since. Not only does it come with measurements in grams and ounces (and volume too, if you must), I also believe that the 'stretch and fold' technique helps developing a better crumb, and thanks to the great instructions in this book I have been baking with pure sourdough starters ever since.

Starting a wild yeast culture was really easy - only after baking happily with it for weeks I realized that many people online aren't quite that lucky with their 'catch' from the get go. Reinhart suggests to use pineapple juice to start the culture, or to try any acidic liquid like lemon or orange juice. I had an old organic grapefruit in the fridge that I had bought by accident, mistaking it for an orange, and used that for the initial mix, and plain orange juice on the second day. My seed culture broke all speed records in regards of foaming and bubbling from day one.

I have had this first culture in my fridge for 1 1/2 years now, refeeding it on average once a week, and it still works great. In fact, it is so active and leavening that even in the recipes that call for commercial yeast on top of the pre-ferment due to eggs or fat, I get away with just the sourdough starter - I haven't bought instant yeast in a year (but if you don't want to bake with sourdough starter, there are plenty of recipes that use store bought yeast only, too).

It still was a learning curve - it took me a while to ignore all the time cues and to just look at the dough. Living in an hot and humid climate like South Florida, I can easily cut all the proofing times stated in half. I ended up with tons of loaves flat and gummy simply because I always ended up over proofing the dough. Now I make sure that I proceed to the next step in the recipe after the starter doubled in size, the dough doubled in size, and the shaped loaf grew by 1 1/2 in size. If I let the shaped loaf grow any further, the yeast has nothing left to give in the oven for any oven spring. Best results always come if I stick the shaped loaves in the fridge and bake them cold the next day. But that is Florida, I might do it differently in a colder climate.

All recipes I tried worked wonderful, provided I didn't end up over proofing, and I feel I was able to take my bread baking attempts to a whole new level. 'Artisan breads in Five' was great to get me into baking to begin with, but real good bread takes a little more effort, more so in managing time, temperatures and techniques than hands on work - but it is so worth it!

(I uploaded a picture of crusty cheese bread, leavened with sourdough starter only, no yeast added)
Jube
On the first few weeks I read carefully the first few chapters, where the author explains in simple words the terms and methods later to be used in the book.
When I started making bread according to the instructions, I found the recipes amazingly accurate and tasty too.
My family is very happy, every weekend I am spoiling them with a new kind of bread.
Till now I baked 5 different recipes (Lean bread, French bread, Biscuit, Cracker, Baguette) and planning to bake the Bagels soon.
The only downsize that I found till now is the vast usage of "Mother Starter" in the book and the lack of an alternative to it - since it takes lots of time to produce such "Mother Starter" I avoided it till now.
Its not that I am new to baking, but the simplicity of the book and the very detailed description of every step or dough condition makes it very friendly to use.
Attached are some photos :-)
Downloaded
I have all of Peter's books. This is by far my favorite. Covers all possibilities from lean dough through holiday treats. All so clear and I love everything I've tried in this book. I have the Baker's Apprentice as my first book. As a novice baker I found it a bit intimidating. But that was my first purchase, and as I continue to work through his processes more and more connects the dots for me. I am 71 years old and about 6 months ago started this "hobby". Well, it consumes my day or weeks. It is so rewarding to produce such delightful, tasty baking to share with family and neighbors. Hope this helps you take on a new project.????
Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day download epub
Baking
Author: Peter Reinhart
ISBN: 1580089984
Category: Cookbooks, Food & Wine
Subcategory: Baking
Language: English
Publisher: Ten Speed Press; 39711th edition (September 29, 2009)
Pages: 224 pages