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Bitters: A Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas download epub

by Ed Anderson,Brad Thomas Parsons


Epub Book: 1425 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1744 kb.

Brad Thomas Parsons tracks the bitters boom in his new book Bitters, and manages to elevate herbs to an art form. Instead I found a recipe book with lots of recipes for bitters and drinks, but essentially every recipe uses the exact same technique to actually produce the biters.

Brad Thomas Parsons tracks the bitters boom in his new book Bitters, and manages to elevate herbs to an art form. Fascinatin. arsons offer techniques for making bitters at home as well as a great collection of unique cocktail recipes. The Washington Post, 11/8/11. The historical information was nice, but the actual "reading" portion of this book took me about 30 minutes. If you are looking for recipes for bitters and bitter containing drinks, get this book.

I think the issue here is that its like 3 books in one. The first third is you history and background on what bitters are, how they're made, and how they've come and gone over the years.

Brad’s book is a must-have for all booze nerds. Wall Street Journal, 11/19/11 "Brad Thomas Parsons tracks the bitters boom in his new book Bitters, and manages to elevate herbs to an art form. The history is fascinating and the recipes are awesome. David Chang, chef/owner of Momofuku Thanks to Brad Thomas Parsons’s inquisitive detective work, readers can discover how cocktail bitters rose from the ashes of Prohibition to become an indispensable ingredient for the country’s top mixologists.

by Brad Thomas Parsons, Ed Anderson (Photographer)Brad Thomas Parsons. Just mix and match your bourbon or rye with different bitters, and the sugar can take the form of a flavored syrup or even maple syrup

by Brad Thomas Parsons, Ed Anderson (Photographer)Brad Thomas Parsons. Just mix and match your bourbon or rye with different bitters, and the sugar can take the form of a flavored syrup or even maple syrup. I’m fond of putting an autumnal twist on the old-fashioned by using bourbon, cinnamon syrup, and apple bitters. Combine the rye or bourbon, simple syrup, and bitters in a mixing glass filled with ice.

Difford's Guide, Brad Thomas Parsons. Cookbook, project guide and barman's manifesto this is a compendium of more than 100 cocktail recipes, featuring traditional favourites as well as gems from author Brad Thomas Parsons' own repertoire. In addition to the recipes, Bitters sheds light on the history and mystery of the alcoholic infusion's origins, profiles artisanal producers, gives step-by-step instructions for making customised blends, and offers a dozen food recipes for bitters-infused dishes.

And few ingredients have as rich a history or serve as fundamental a role in our beverage heritage as bitters. Whether you’re a professional looking to take your game to the next level or just a.

Part history, part project guide, and part recipe book, Bitters: A Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All . This is why I nearly leapt out of bed while reading Bitters: A Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All with Cocktails, Recipes & Formulas.

Part history, part project guide, and part recipe book, Bitters: A Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All with Cocktails, Recipes & Formulas manages to do what most do not: wrap up centuries worth of information about a single subject into one book you'll be eager to dig in and out of. Read on to learn more and win a copy of your ow. Author Brad Thomas Parsons called bitters "An essential seasoning agent for drinks and even food. Think of them, he says, "as a bartender's salt and pepper.

Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons 9781580083591 (Hardback, 2011) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 9 to 11 working days. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 20 brand new listings. Bitters: A Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas by Brad Thomas Parsons (Hardback, 2011). Brand new: lowest price.

Featured Recipes from Bitters The Horse's Neck Called the great . Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas.

book by Brad Thomas Parsons. Bitters : A Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas. by Brad Thomas Parsons.

Gone are the days when a lonely bottle of Angostura bitters held court behind the bar. A cocktail renaissance has swept across the country, inspiring in bartenders and their thirsty patrons a new fascination with the ingredients, techniques, and traditions that make the American cocktail so special. And few ingredients have as rich a history or serve as fundamental a role in our beverage heritage as bitters.   Author and bitters enthusiast Brad Thomas Parsons traces the history of the world’s most storied elixir, from its earliest “snake oil” days to its near evaporation after Prohibition to its ascension as a beloved (and at times obsessed-over) ingredient on the contemporary bar scene. Parsons writes from the front lines of the bitters boom, where he has access to the best and boldest new brands and flavors, the most innovative artisanal producers, and insider knowledge of the bitters-making process.   Whether you’re a professional looking to take your game to the next level or just a DIY-type interested in homemade potables, Bitters has a dozen recipes for customized blends--ranging from Apple to Coffee-Pecan to Root Beer bitters--as well as tips on sourcing ingredients and step-by-step instructions fit for amateur and seasoned food crafters alike.   Also featured are more than seventy cocktail recipes that showcase bitters’ diversity and versatility: classics like the Manhattan (if you ever get one without bitters, send it back), old-guard favorites like the Martinez, contemporary drinks from Parsons’s own repertoire like the Shady Lane, plus one-of-a-kind libations from the country’s most pioneering bartenders. Last but not least, there is a full chapter on cooking with bitters, with a dozen recipes for sweet and savory bitters-infused dishes.   Part recipe book, part project guide, part barman’s manifesto, Bitters is a celebration of good cocktails made well, and of the once-forgotten but blessedly rediscovered virtues of bitters.

Comments: (7)

Saberblade
From Rowley's Whiskey Forge:

It has become a cliché of modern bartending that bitters are to cocktails as salt is to soup. They are the seasoning, the ingredient that can turn merely acceptable drinks into stellar ones. Or, as one Filipino friend explained to another in a turn close to my heart, "Bitters are to cocktails as bay leaves are to adobo." You may or may not be able to pinpoint the taste, but without it, everything has a certain flatness.

If you already make your own cocktail bitters, chances are that Brad Thomas Parsons' recent book on the subject holds little new for you. On the other hand, if you're just starting to dabble or don't know where to begin, Bitters conveniently brings together a lot of material in one place. With no other bitters manual in print, one might even call it indispensable for the DIY cocktail enthusiast.

After some introductory remarks and history, Parsons dives into the meat of the matter with short profiles of some two dozen players in today's bitters boom: Fee Brothers, Bittermans, The Bitter Truth, Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters, Bar Keep Bitters, Scrappy's, and more. Not a bad lineup considering that a decade ago, Angostura, Fee Brothers, and Peychaud's were the three remaining bitters producers that survived Prohibition. He includes recipes for thirteen bitters such as apple, orange, rhubarb, coffee-pecan, and root beer bitters. A substantial collection of cocktail recipes using bitters -- more than half the book -- rounds out the pages.

Parsons clearly has spent much time obsessing over bitters; he interviews appropriate authorities and booze pundits, he includes the right companies and products, and he hits the high points of history. He's done his homework. Yet there's a clumsiness about his writing. After going on for some length about sassafras, for instance, Parsons calls for using it in a recipe -- but what part of the plant? The powdered leaves he writes about? The root he mentions? They are as different as ham and bacon. Or consider this entry under Snake Oil Bitters: "Not much is known about this lineup of Brooklyn bitters or their creator..." Really? That's either lazy or disingenuous.

The passage that prompted me to bark out in disbelief, though, is this:

"Once I've sized up a joint, I'll ask the bartender, 'Do you make your own bitters?' More often than not, the answer is yes."

Oh, come on. Laudable as making bitters is, I guarantee you that the vast majority of American bartenders do no such thing. I can only imagine that this is a sampling error stemming from Parsons' preference for places with what he deems "serious bar programs." I like those places, too, but they're far from the only game in town.

While there are welcome lists of bittering and flavoring agents, there's no attempt to give them Linnaean names or even thumbnail descriptions. When plants' common names vary from place to place and related plants often parade under the same name, specifying genus and species is especially important, a convention one finds in the most useful gardening books and horticultural tomes. The lists entirely omit traditional bitters coloring agents such as sandalwood, Brazil wood, and cochineal.

Don't get me wrong; I'm glad to own a copy. If you're into cocktails, you should get one, too, if only to understand this core ingredient better. Even if you have no intention to macerate, infuse, percolate, and use homemade bitters, there's a wealth of recipes for cocktails using commercial examples. It's just that I would prefer to have seen a stronger editorial hand here, a more rigorous historical and scientific review before Bitters had gone to print. If I sound disappointed, it's because the book is merely good; it could have been great.
Fast Lovebird
Loosely speaking, I found this book divided into four sections. The first - and for me, possibly the least interesting - summarizes a bit of history of these botanical concoctions. They go back centuries, to eras when all medicine was herbal medicine, and medical effect was largely imagined or wishful thinking. That lead to wild (and sometimes hazardous) combinations of ingredients. Things like Coca Cola blurred the line between drug and foodstuff. Then, in the early twentieth century, a few things happened to change the market of herbal elixirs. Drug safety laws cut back the more extravagant claims of curing everything from acne to yaws, drug enforcement laws banished cocaine and opiates from the retail shelves, and then The Prohibition all but ended the use of flavorings in alcohol. Only now are bars recovering from the damage done by that unfortunate legislation.

Against that backdrop, the second section really offers what I came for. It provides recipes for a range of bitters, and demonstrates common proportions of the least familiar ingredients. Given these as bases, and given the strongly stereotyped procedure for preparing the bitters, I'm eager to try a few, then go off on my own. (Maybe I'll try the cranberry bitters, alluded to but without recipe or suppliers.) The third section provides not just cocktail recipes from different eras of the American cocktail history, but a glimpse into the world of cocktail culture and community. Wow - some people take their tipple incredibly seriously. I can't complain too much, though, because these bold and dedicated explorers have made it possible for dabblers like me to get started. The book's fourth section interested me only a little, as the non-beverage culinary uses of bitters.

Outside of the recipes, the lists of common (and uncommon) ingredients in bitters were very helpful, as were lists of suppliers. The latter might not be very useful years from now, but will help readers contemporary with the book's publishing. This brings together information from a wide range of sources, many of them historical, personal, and otherwise difficult to access. For someone like me, interested in the topic but not dedicated to it, this represents a unique resource for this very specialized corner of the culinary world.

-- wiredweird, a bitters old man

Update: Tested the orange bitters recipe. It has a fresher orange taste than any commercial product I've tried. Next time, I might boost the minor flavors and bitterness - not complaining, it's just that I mess with almost every recipe I try.
lets go baby
Let me start by saying I have just gotten into the idea of making bitters, and have read a bunch on the interweb. I bought this to find out more in depth information about mixing techniques, hoping to find deep explanations and theories about the different things I found on the Web. Instead I found a recipe book with lots of recipes for bitters and drinks, but essentially every recipe uses the exact same technique to actually produce the biters.

The historical information was nice, but the actual "reading" portion of this book took me about 30 minutes.

If you are looking for recipes for bitters and bitter containing drinks, get this book. If you are looking for a fascinating read about bitters or for in depth explanations of various techniques to make your own bitters, you will find more information in 30 minutes on the interweb.
SiIеnt
Made my first batch of Orange Bitters and it was delicious! Can't waitron make another flavor.
Great history of Bitters and its origins.
Really enjoyed this book.
Golden Lama
This is a fantastic book if for no other reason than it appears to be the only game in town when it comes to really diving into bitters. I took one star off because some of the recipes could stand to be clearer. For example, in one recipe, the author explains that he likes using grated lime zest rather than thin strips because it brings the flavor out better. Then the recipe calls for zest cut into strips as well as grated zest. This is not the only instance where directions are unclear. If there were a little more explanation on parts like that, it would be a glowing 5-star.
FailCrew
Bought as a Christmas gift and the recipient absolutely LOVES it! A huge success.
Bitters: A Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas download epub
Beverages & Wine
Author: Ed Anderson,Brad Thomas Parsons
ISBN: 1580083595
Category: Cookbooks, Food & Wine
Subcategory: Beverages & Wine
Language: English
Publisher: Ten Speed Press; 1 edition (November 1, 2011)
Pages: 240 pages