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The Spice and Herb Bible download epub

by Ian Hemphill


Epub Book: 1781 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1434 kb.

Ian Hemphill lives in Sydney, Australia, and grew up working in his family's spice business.

Ian Hemphill lives in Sydney, Australia, and grew up working in his family's spice business. He opened a specialty shop called Herbie's Spices, which boasts one of the largest selections of herbs and spices for sale and export in the southern hemisphere. Spice and Herb Bible' by Australian spice merchant, Ian Hemphill, published by Canadian culinary & publishing specialist, Robert Rose is a serious entry to be one's definitive reference for spices and herbs, but it fails largely because of the strength of its competition and from the fact that it is not as cook friendly as its subtitle, & Cook's Guide'. may make you believe.

If you love to cook and experiment with food, you should definitely have this book on your shelf. I would love an electronic version to take with me when I travel. I know that cook books should get one excited about cooking, but this Spice and Herb Bible is different in that it gets you excited about experimenting beyond the constraints of following a recipe. With this book it's more about the tools than it is the project, and my tool box has just gone from a few screwdrivers and a hammer to a tool warehouse.

Professional chefs and home cooks love to experiment with spices and herbs to enhance food flavours and to create new taste combinations and sensations.

Cooks everywhere use spices and herbs to enhance food flavors and to create new taste combinations and .

Cooks everywhere use spices and herbs to enhance food flavors and to create new taste combinations and sensations. From bay leaves to lemongrass to vanilla beans, a well-stocked kitchen must have a wide selection of herbs and spices.

Spice & Herb Bible, Paperback by Hemphill, Ian; Hemphill, Kate, Brand New, F. .Ian Hemphill, a native of Sydney, Australia, oversees Herbie's Spices, which boasts the largest selection of herbs and spices for sale and export.item 2 Spice and Herb Bible by Ian Hemphill New Paperback Book -Spice and Herb Bible by Ian Hemphill New Paperback Book. au or ww. erbiesspicesusa. Kate Hemphill is a chef, food writer and home economist who runs her own cooking classes in London. She is also the representative for Herbie's Spices in the UK. Country of Publication.

What others are saying. Booktopia has The Spice and Herb Bible by Ian Hemphill. Loved this big compendium from he Spice Guru aka Herbie Ian Hemphill. What's A Good Cilantro Substitute? The Flavor Bible: The Essential Guide to Culinary Creativity, Based on the Wisdom of America& Most Imaginative Chefs.

Ian Hemphill, a native of Sydney, Australia, oversees Herbie's Spices, which boasts the largest selection of herbs and spices for sale and export.

The classic reference - expanded and in full color.

Professional chefs and home cooks use spices and herbs to enhance food flavors and to create new taste combinations and sensations. From vanilla beans to cinnamon, from cumin to tarragon, no kitchen is complete without spices and herbs.

The second edition of this classic reference is significantly expanded, with four new spices and herbs as well as 25 additional blends. The book is now printed in full color and features color photography throughout. Every herb and spice has a handsome and detailed color photograph to make identification and purchasing a breeze. The book includes fascinating and authoritative histories of a wide range of global herbs and spices such as angelica, basil, candle nut, chervil, elder, fennel, grains of paradise, licorice root, saffron, tamarind, Vietnamese mint and zedoary.

The Spice and Herb Bible, Second Edition, includes 100 spices and herbs and 50 spice-blend recipes. It is an essential resource for any well-equipped kitchen.


Comments: (7)

Brajind
`The Spice and Herb Bible' by Australian spice merchant, Ian Hemphill, published by Canadian culinary `bible' publishing specialist, Robert Rose is a serious entry to be one's definitive reference for spices and herbs, but it fails largely because of the strength of its competition and from the fact that it is not as cook friendly as its subtitle, `A Cook's Guide' may make you believe.

My choice for first and second place among good books on kitchen seasonings are `The Contemporary Encyclopedia of herbs & spices' by Seattle spice merchant Tony Hill and perennial culinary expert, Jill Norman's `herbs & spices, the cook's reference'. While these books are very different from one another, they are both superior to Hemphill's book as a reference to the average home cook. Oddly enough, this book may actually be the best of the three as a reference for the aspiring spice merchant.

The first thing that made me wary of Hemphill's book was its very choppy and anecdotal history of the spice trade. It hit only the most interesting highlights, and got several facts wrong in the process. The two most serious errors may have been ascribing the military expansion of Islam to the prophet Mohammed personally and by ascribing to the inaccurate and largely discredited doctrine that the European use of spices was to mask poorly preserved meat. In fact, meat preservation technology (charcuterie) was really very highly developed by post-Roman Europe.

There is no question that Hemphill gives us oodles of good information about herbs and spices, but unlike Norman's very cleverly organized book, this information is practically useless for the cook who happens to want to use an herb or spice in a dish and wishes to find an appropriate selection, when she knows she wants a hint of licorice flavor in a fresh herb, but her local megamart is all out of her known sources of anise flavorings. If it were not for the historical gaffs in the historical overview and the fact that Hemphill puts all of his entries under the rubric of `spices' rather than splitting them up by herb and spice (like Norman), or at least identifying the dictionary section as `Herbs and Spices' (like Hill).

Each entry does look like a guide for the merchant or scholar rather than the cook. It includes:

Common Name

Other Common Name(s)

Botanical Name, i.e. genus and species

Botanical Family (genuses belong to families in the Linnean classification scheme)

Names in other languages (a la Bruce Cost's excellent `Asian Ingredients')

Flavor Group - This is a means of organizing seasonings which Hemphill may have contrived himself. At the very least, it is not broadly used and does not correspond to the familiar four or five tastes on the tongue.

Weight per Teaspoon - A means of converting weights to volumes for shredded, ground, or finely chopped seasonings. The usefulness of this material escapes me.

Suggested quantity per pound - A similarly arcane fact that I doubt any professional chef would ever use.

Complements - Foods best used in. If this were presented in a tabular fashion giving foods followed by best used spices, this would really be useful.

Used in - Lists spice blends in which the material is an ingredient.

Combines with - Spices which work well together. Somewhat useful.

Description - Why not a picture! This is Norman's greatest strength in that she gives color pictures of every single species.

Origin and History - Nice, but I don't trust the author's history lessons!

Processing - Interesting

Buying and Storage - Most useful for a merchant.

Use - The only really useful section.

Recipe - Elaboration on `Use'.

Hemphill's last section is on spice mixes where, again, Norman and Hill do much better jobs of providing both useful recipes and avoiding any misleading notions. Where Hemphill gives but one recipe for the French `bouquet garni', Norman gives six, making it clear that the notion of this spice mix is highly mutable, depending on the use to which it is to be put.

As encyclopedically complete as Hemphill's book seems, I detected a few significant oversights, such as his ignoring the two different (Middle Eastern and California) sources of bay leaf. Most cooking authorities warn us away from the offering from the golden state and endorse the Turkish bay. Hemphill deals only with the Turkish source. Also, while Norman cites fourteen (14) different varieties, including pictures of every single one, Hemphill features but one and dismisses the others. This seems to me a bigger oversight then one may think, as there is a great divide between the Mediterranean basils and the varieties used in southern and Southeast Asia.

While this book is useful if you happen to already own it, if you searching for a good book on spices and herbs, I strongly suggest you pick Jill Norman's book or both Norman's book and Hill's book, as the two are highly complementary.
Sharpbrew
Not only does this book enable the home cook to identify what a herb or spice is all about, but Ian Hempill advises what other herbs and/or spices may added to the one in question to further increase flavour in your cooking. The photos through the book also show what the herb looks like and then scattered through the book are relatively simple recipes.

Importantly (and the main reason behind my purchase) if like myself, one has a grandchild or other person that is anaphylactic (highly allergic) to certain herbs/spices, the book gives ALL the names of the particular product in a number of languages. He also gives advice on how the herb / spice is produced and from which plant/bush tree etc it originates.
Orll
Excellent book. Thank you.
monotronik
Excellent book, now I know what to use.
Diredefender
Great product for a fair price. Excellent book. Well written and categorized.
Shadowredeemer
The format could have been a little better in this book but I have found it to be a good resource and very informative for use in my spice store
Shistus
I love to use spices but wanted something beyond good recipes in my books.This book allows you to blend and measure for your own recipe uses and do it right . everything you need to know is here...
a little more than I was looking for but over all a great book when you are learning to create flavors without using condiments.
The Spice and Herb Bible download epub
Cooking by Ingredient
Author: Ian Hemphill
ISBN: 0778801462
Category: Cookbooks, Food & Wine
Subcategory: Cooking by Ingredient
Language: English
Publisher: Robert Rose; Second Edition edition (March 5, 2006)
Pages: 607 pages