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Houston Deco: Modernistic Architecture of the Texas Coast download epub

by David Bush,Jim Parsons


Epub Book: 1647 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1481 kb.

DFW Deco: Modernistic Architecture of North Texas. The printing and design of the book are fine and the back includes a building index, a short bibliography and nicely an alphabetical index of architects.

DFW Deco: Modernistic Architecture of North Texas. If you live in the city the book will be an excellent reminder of some good working architecture of past decades. For others, like me, it's a useful visual reference to a European design cleverly modified to an American style. David Bush is the director of Programs and Information for the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance.

With Jim Parsons, he is co-author and co-photographer of the book Houston Deco: Modernistic Architecture of. .

With Jim Parsons, he is co-author and co-photographer of the book Houston Deco: Modernistic Architecture of the Texas Coast, released in 2008. JIM PARSONS, a native of Baytown, Texas, puts his lifelong interest in Texas history and architecture to use as director of Greater Houston Preservation Alliance's Museum of Houston and volunteer chairman of its Walking Tours Program.

When it comes to art deco, Houston is rarely cited in the same breath as Miami, New York, or Los Angeles, but this Texas city boasts many gorgeous examples of this ury style, some of which are in jeopardy of being forever altered or demolished.

Jim Parsons’s most popular book is A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo. Houston Deco: Modernistic Architecture of the Texas Coast by. Jim Parsons, David Bush. Madeleine McDermott Hamm (Foreword). Teaching From The Inside Out by. Larry Beauchamp, Jim Parsons.

In 2008, Jim Parsons and David Bush, staff members of the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance, published Houston Deco: Modernistic Architecture of the Texas Coast, a photographic sampling intended to draw attention to the region's surviving examples of buildings.

In 2008, Jim Parsons and David Bush, staff members of the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance, published Houston Deco: Modernistic Architecture of the Texas Coast, a photographic sampling intended to draw attention to the region's surviving examples of buildings erected between the 1920s and the late 1940s in the modernistic styles popularly known as Art Deco and Art Moderne. Hill Country Deco applies this model to Central Texas, covering an area considerably beyond the geographical Hill Country to include San Antonio and Austin as well as towns in the prairie lands to the east

When it comes to art deco, Houston is rarely cited in the same breath as Miami, New York, or Los Angeles, but this Texas city boasts many gorgeous examples . Houston Deco : Modernistic Architecture of the Texas Coast. by Jim Parsons and David Bush.

When it comes to art deco, Houston is rarely cited in the same breath as Miami, New York, or Los Angeles, but this Texas city boasts many gorgeous examples of this.

Jim Parsons, David Bush. Modernistic Architecture of the Texas Coast. Published September 15, 2007 by Bright Sky Press.

Photographed by Preservation Houston staff members Jim Parsons and David Bush, this book documents Art Deco and Art Moderne buildings across southeast Texas through more than 100 original color photographs. The image on the cover is a detail of a lobby mural in Houston City Hall. Houston Deco was published with generous support from the Houston Architecture Foundation and the Strake Foundation.

When it comes to art deco, Houston is rarely cited in the same breath as Miami, New York, or Los Angeles, but this Texas city boasts many gorgeous examples of this early-twentieth-century style, some of which are in jeopardy of being forever altered or demolished. In the 1920s, as Houston was beginning its transition from medium-sized southern city to major American metropolis, local business and civic leaders made a conscious decision to create a new image for their community. As the Roaring Twenties gave way to the Great Depression, Art Deco zigzags and Art Moderne streamlining reshaped the city's stores, skyscrapers, factories, and apartment buildings. More than one hundred color photographs showcase the fine detailing on Houston's surviving Art Deco and Art Moderne structures. From downtown landmarks to east end industrial sites, this lavish guide captures the grace and beauty of these innovative designs with an eye toward the importance of conservation, restoration, and preservation.

Comments: (6)

Gann
This is a fine coffee-table book of excellent photographs of Art Deco, Moderne, and Modernist architecture in Houston. It whets one's appetite to visit Houston and see these buildings in person.
Kesalard
Excellent. One of the authors is the son of my high school classmate 50 years ago and we are both still alive.
Vikus
The National Trust Guide to Art Deco in America (ISBN 0471143863) lists eight buildings in Houston, all are obviously in this book with another ninety or so but look through the photos and it becomes clear that many of them are living on borrowed time unless the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance can save them.

The authors (they took the photos, too) have done a great job in capturing the essence of probably every Deco/Moderne building in Houston. There are a few interiors but mostly they are exteriors and some close-ups of detail. Divided into commercial, theaters, institutional, residential and industrial sections. Each section has at least one gem, I loved the interior of the Alabama Theater which is now a bookshop but unfortunately it looks like it will be demolished soon. Page thirteen has a fascinating period postcard of an aerial view of the River Oaks Community Center designed in 1937, the buildings still stands but for how long?

The printing and design of the book are fine and the back includes a building index, a short bibliography and nicely an alphabetical index of architects. If you live in the city the book will be an excellent reminder of some good working architecture of past decades. For others, like me, it's a useful visual reference to a European design cleverly modified to an American style.

***FOR AN INSIDE LOOK click 'customer images' under the cover.
Zbr
Honestly, I have never thought of houston as having great art deco architecture..NYC, Miami, Chicago of course, but not Houston, and after reading this book, im still not sure. Houston really never went all the way with Deco, I mean the City Hall is a decent example, and so is Jesse Jones' Gulf Building, by far Houston's best example of Art Deco, which unfortunity had its great interiors altered, but really compare it to the Art Deco masterpiece, Buffalo City Hall, or NYC's Rockefeller Center, they dont evern remotely compare, having said that, this is a very good book, it's well researched, with vivid visuals, it's just a shame Houston is not more worthy a subject for a study on great art deco architecture. Houston is a bastion of Modern architecture, it has an embarassment of treasures in that reguard, but unfortunity in this architectural category is woefully bereft, all the more remarkable that this is such a good book.
Ranicengi
An eye-opener and the answer to several questions I have been asking myself ever since i moved here to Houston a few decades ago. Lovely book!!!
Andromakus
Born and raised in Houston, Texas and it was nice to read up a little history from Houston. This is great reading for those days where time is available to just do that - reading.
Houston Deco: Modernistic Architecture of the Texas Coast download epub
Home Improvement & Design
Author: David Bush,Jim Parsons
ISBN: 1933979062
Category: Crafts, Hobbies & Home
Subcategory: Home Improvement & Design
Language: English
Publisher: Bright Sky Press; First Edition edition (January 1, 2008)
Pages: 128 pages