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Hothouse Kids: The Dilemma of the Gifted Child download epub

by Alissa Quart


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Critically acclaimed author Alissa Quart breaks the news about an issue that will be of urgent concern to parents and educators as well as adult readers with "gifted" pasts: the dilemma of the gifted child.

Critically acclaimed author Alissa Quart breaks the news about an issue that will be of urgent concern to parents and educators as well as adult readers with "gifted" pasts: the dilemma of the gifted child. While studies show that children who are superior learners do benefit from enriched early education, the intensely competitive lives of America's gifted and talented kids do have risks. The pressure can have long-term effects in adult life, from debilitating perfectionism to performance anxiety and lifelong feelings of failure.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -248) and index. While studies show that children who are superior learners benefit from enriched early education, the intensely competitive lives of America's gifted and talented kids do have risks.

She often portrays the gifted children in her anecdotes as freaks, gifted educators as New Age crackpots, and parents of the gifted as control freaks or mercenaries. While this is no doubt true in some cases, I doubt it is true in most. She also seems to think the concept of giftedness is some kind of tool in class warfare, and she refers to homeschooling as a form of extreme parenting.

In Hothouse Kids, Alissa Quart takes us inside the strange and compelling world of the child genius. Her clever take on the world of child enrichment is sure to engage, and the anecdotal evidence she marshals is actually fun to read. I bought it. I liked it. I recommend it. 0. Report. Sensitive and thought-provoking.

In Hothouse Kids, we traverse the country to meet gifted kids, prodigies, and "former" gifted kids, clarifying what early .

In Hothouse Kids, we traverse the country to meet gifted kids, prodigies, and "former" gifted kids, clarifying what early enrichment worked for them and what went too far, in stories both droll and tragic. Surveying expert assessments of the necessary role of unstructured play in child development, Hothouse Kids delves into the disappearance of recess and the pitfalls of children's overstuffed schedules.

I am the author of the forthcoming Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America, the three non-fiction books Branded, Hothouse Kids and Republic of Outsiders and the poetry book Monetized.

The Dilemma of the Gifted Child. Alissa Quart breaks the news about an issue that will be of urgent concern to parents and educators as well as adult readers with "gifted" pasts: the dilemma of the gifted child

The Dilemma of the Gifted Child. Alissa Quart breaks the news about an issue that will be of urgent concern to parents and educators as well as adult readers with "gifted" pasts: the dilemma of the gifted child. How should parents and educators draw the line?

Alissa Quart learned to read at three. Not really, writes Quart, now 34, in her new book, Hothouse Kids: The Dilemma of the Gifted Child (Penguin Press).

Alissa Quart learned to read at three. By the time she was five, her father counted on her to offer presentations on modernist art. In elementary school, she taught her own friends to read. Having been built in the fashion I was as a child - created and then deflated - has left me with a distinct feeling of failure. Designating children as gifted, especially extremely gifted, and cultivating that giftedness may be not only a waste of money, but positively harmful," she writes. The overcultivated can develop self-esteem problems and performance anxiety.

Hothouse Kids The Dilemma of the Gifted Child.

In her new book, "Hothouse Kids: The Dilemma of the Gifted Child," author Alissa Quart dubs this conflation of childhood, competition and commerce the "Baby Genius Edutainment Complex

In her new book, "Hothouse Kids: The Dilemma of the Gifted Child," author Alissa Quart dubs this conflation of childhood, competition and commerce the "Baby Genius Edutainment Complex. Along with the social isolation that comes with odd obsessive interests (who can a 6-year-old carnivorous plant expert talk shop with?), the hothouse kid is burdened by a premature emphasis on maturity and professionalism. And unfortunately, as Quart discovers, for every well-adjusted child math ace who sails smoothly into life as a financial service wiz, there are two prodigies whose adult lives never live up to their fantasies.

An investigation into the pressures placed on today's gifted children evaluates the long-term consequences of high demands and competitiveness, revealing the truth about current practices in IQ testing, the pitfalls of the No Child Left Behind Act, and the downside of popular practices in over-scheduling. By the author of Branded. 30,000 first printing.

Comments: (7)

Faugami
This is not a worthless resource, but to yawn through scientific tidbits, endless anecdotes, and cute writing would have some value if Hothouse Kids attempted more than the obvious: Whatever their cognitive and emotional capacities, children need to learn by having curiosity elicited rather than through the compelling of performance. Were such a challenge that simply met! Given the bureaucratic nature of institutions, unbridgeable socioeconomic diversity in an oligarchic culture, and educational systems which are funded lamentably compared with martial expenditures, should we expect more than the present situation? Sure, gifted is great providing parents do not demand where interests flag, and creatively engaging the norm has always been every good teacher's goal . . . yet does that realization require another volume? At least this effort (despite shortchanging the critical opportunity pregnancy offers) moves a bit beyond Ralph Schoenstein's Toilet Trained for Yale: Adventures in 21st-Century Parenting--as does common sense.

Brent Logan
JoJoshura
Alissa Quart is an excellent writer of gifted talent, which if for no other reason makes "Hothouse Kids" worth reading. I recommend that the 'Contents' pages are viewed to see what topics are covered (use the "search inside" feature).

Book titles receive different interpretations from different people. From my own point of view, 'hothousing' implies a result-driven focus to harvest the greatest quantity of fruit from a single plant while protecting and alienating the plant from its natural environment, or in other words, forcing a living being to do something that it otherwise would not do. "Hothouse Kids" lives up to its title by clarifying that "The Dilemma of the Gifted Child" can be the result of parents attempting to harvest too much talent from gifted children.

The book's theme is structured on a series of observations and interviews with parents, organizations, teachers, and gifted children themselves. The writing style is lively, colorful, and possesses a quantity of good dry humor. Being written from the viewpoint of having been a child prodigy herself, Quark's choices of phrases reflect her skill as well as her own experiences of having been hothoused.

I purchased "Hothouse Kids" while researching prodigy biographies. It is rare to find a book written by the prodigy him/herself, and for those of us who are interested in hearing the opinions of the prodigy (and not the opinions of non-prodigies who wrongly believe they have an insight into the prodigious mind), it is quite a delight to catch a glimpse into Quart's likes and dislikes. Historically and psychologically, "Hothouse Kids" is an important book, regardless of whether a reader might agree or disagree with the author's opinions.

Modern society places much value in its belief that high intelligence is measurable through IQ tests, and Quart gives ample attention to how the belief is happily endorsed by makers of intelligence tests and educational curriculums. Quart rightly makes light of the "Edutainment" industry that manufactures and sells a wide array of educational toys, DVDs, and other products that claim to increase intelligence.

Two customer reviews at Amazon.com were written by individuals who said that they had been interviewed by Quart. The customers stated that Quart misquoted and altered some comments. It is an unfortunate reality that an author's early manuscript drafts can mysteriously become infested with obviously wrong information, and mistakes do happen, but mistakes are normally caught during the final edit. The full facts behind the customer reviews are unknown to me, and I do not know the extent of errors that might exist relative to the two interviews, but the errors are useful for illustrating two very important natures of all biographies: (1) all authors are human, and all humans make mistakes, and (2) no biography should be ever trusted to be one-hundred percent correct. On page 228, "Hothouse Kids" referenced information about William Sidis that was taken from Amy Wallace's "The Prodigy: A Biography of William James Sidis, America's Greatest Child Prodigy." Readers familiar with "Myths, Facts, and Lies About Prodigies - A Historiography of William James Sidis" will recognize how the historical errors about William Sidis that originated in the early twentieth century were found in "The Prodigy" and are now found in "Hothouse Kids" as well. The errors are not fatal, and the errors about Sidis are not the creation of Quart's, but it is still important to recognize that the errors exist and where they originated.

Over all, the book vividly lives up to its title, and there are several dozen excellent insights that further heighten the book's usefulness. One observation by Quart is from page 205: "One of the things that my research clarified for me was that there are actually very few deeply "gifted" kids with transcendent cognitive or artistic abilities; therefore kids are being incorrectly labeled as exceptionally gifted. The peril is that some children who have been led to believe they are highly gifted will suffer, like Icarus, in their later lives."

"Hothouse Kids" is an especially important book for biographers, all parents who might believe that their children are gifted, and everyone else that might enjoy learning about the 'gifted' industry.
Sharpmane
As a mother and pediatrician, I found myself intrigued by the contents of the book. Alissa Quart thoroughly researched this disturbing trend of pushing "gifted" children out of childhood. It is written in an engaging, informative style. It is a must read for all parents.

Shirley Press, MD
Gir
Having raised an extraordinarily talented whiz kid, I have since read many many books on raising gifted children (AFTER my son was an adult) . I am obsessed and fascinated by out of the ordinary, highly unusual, extraordinarily, profoundly gifted children. She had put together an exhaustive number of personal stories and examples. Having spoken to, interviewed, and taught a few of these unbelievably bright children myself, I think Quart has done a phenomenal job of portraying them in contemporary society. Clearly a talented writer, she has put together a lot of opinions and studies in very readable and interesting form as few could. Thanks, Alissa for all the work that went into providing this book for us to read. Those of us who have to figure out how to address the needs of these children thank you! For teachers and parents who have only encountered the merely very bright (95% types) and not the amazing 99.99% types, you have no clue how hard it is to figure out how to meet the needs of these misfit children. We lose more of the 99.99% children than the average ones. Sad, sad, how the very important needs of these children are ignored or misunderstood.
Hothouse Kids: The Dilemma of the Gifted Child download epub
Schools & Teaching
Author: Alissa Quart
ISBN: 1594200955
Category: Education & Teaching
Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Press; 1 edition (August 17, 2006)
Pages: 272 pages