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Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy: Latino Migrants Crossing the Linguistic Border download epub

by Tomás Mario Kalmar


Epub Book: 1936 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1529 kb.

Kalmar's book, for me, reads as a parable of how all of us, undocumented migrant worker or US resident, Latino . Tomás Kalmar's book is a charming combination of personal experience and erudite scholarship, written in an engaging fashion

Kalmar's book, for me, reads as a parable of how all of us, undocumented migrant worker or US resident, Latino or Anglo, poor or rich, privileged or unprivileged, are one in our common effort to understand ourselves and each other - indeed, to understand ourselves through understanding each other. Learning must be mutual, interactive. Tomás Kalmar's book is a charming combination of personal experience and erudite scholarship, written in an engaging fashion. The author's treatment of the politics of biliteracy, from the fruit-groves of the Midwest to the halls of academe, is both passionate and clear-sighted.

In this article, Part I of Cultural Action for Freedom, Paulo Freire rejects mechanistic conceptions of the adult literacy process, advocating instead a theory and practice based upon authentic dialogue between teachers and learners.

Home Browse Books Book details, Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy: Latino. By Tomás Mario Kalmar. The book begins with a true story about "illegal aliens" who, in the summer of 1980, in the town of Cobden, Illinois, decided to help each other write down English como de veras se oye-the way it really sounds.

Start by marking Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy: Latino Migrants .

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How do "illegal aliens" chart the speech sounds of colloquial English? This book is timeless in offering an unusually direct entry into how a group of Mexican fruit pickers analyze their first encounter with local American speech in a tiny.

How do "illegal aliens" chart the speech sounds of colloquial English? This book is timeless in offering an unusually direct entry into how a group of Mexican fruit pickers analyze their first encounter with local American speech in a tiny rural Midwestern community in the United States.

This book is timeless in offering an unusually direct entry into how a group of Mexican fruit pickers analyze their first encounter with local American speech in a tiny rural Midwestern community in the United States. Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy.

Tomás Mario Kalmar organized Paulo Freire’s visit to Sydney in 1974 and served as his interpreter.

Tomás Mario Kalmar organized Paulo Freire’s visit to Sydney in 1974 and served as his interpreter. He has helped to launch a wide variety of innovative educational projects for children and adults, ranging from Su Casa Migrant Head Start in southern Illinois to California State University Monterey Bay. Currently he is Co-Director, Community Learning Center, International Sonoran Desert Alliance, USA.

Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy--based on four years of intensive fieldwork in a small rural community in Southern Illinois--is a landmark work in the area of adult literacy, combining insights from linguistics, anthropology, literacy studies, and education in a culturally situated exploration of the language and literacy practices of migrant workers. As such, it is a substantive contribution to the linguistic study of indigenous literacies; to sociocultural approaches to language, learning, and literacy; and to ethnographic and critical approaches to education. The book begins with a true story about "illegal aliens" who, in the summer of 1980, in the town of Cobden, Illinois, decided to help each other write down English como de veras se oye--the way it really sounds. The focus is on why and how they did this, what they actually wrote down, and what happened to their texts. The narrative then shifts to how and why the strategies adult immigrants actually use in order to cope with English in the real world seem to have little in common with those used by students in publicly funded bilingual and ESL classrooms. The book concludes with a discussion of the ideal of a universal alphabet, about the utopian claim that anyone can use a canonical set of 26 letters to reduce to script any language, ever spoken by anyone, anywhere, at any time. This claim is so familiar that it is easy to overlook how much undocumented intellectual labor was invested over the centuries by those who successfully carried the alphabet across the border from one language to the next. From this undocumented labor, without which none of us would now be able to read, everyone profits. To make his story and his argument as accessible as possible, Kalmar steers clear of jargon and excessive technical terminology. At the same time, however, readers who are familiar with any of the current postmodern discourses on the social construction of symbolic forms will be able to bring such discourses to bear on what he has to say about the game, the discourse, and the scene of writing that constitute the focus of his theoretical analysis. When people today argue about "illegal aliens" in the United States, probably the last question on their minds is the one to which this book is devoted: how do "illegal aliens" use an alphabet they already know in order to chart the speech sounds of colloquial English? It is the author's hope that readers will interpret his story as a parable with serious political implications. Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy is a compelling, vitally relevant book for researchers, students, practitioners, and anyone else interested in language and literacy in social, cultural, and political contexts, including bilingual and ESL education, second-language acquisition and development, applied and sociolinguistics, multicultural education, educational anthropology, and qualitative research.

Comments: (7)

Ueledavi
Tomas Kalmar's Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy has earned what I'm sure is deserved high praise from specialists in social linguistics and literacy studies. My own admiration for the book has a different source. As a Roman Catholic deacon committed to serving the US's migrant worker population, I find Illegal Alphabets an invaluable source of support for understanding the value of human solidarity, a value sharpened and emphasized by its emergence even in the midst of scapegoating and oppression. Kalmar's book, for me, reads as a parable of how all of us, undocumented migrant worker or US resident, Latino or Anglo, poor or rich, privileged or unprivileged, are one in our common effort to understand ourselves and each other -- indeed, to understand ourselves through understanding each other. Learning must be mutual, interactive. We are all at the same time students and teachers of each other, reciprocally strengthened by our willingness to play multiple roles of master and disciple, neither clinging to the first nor stifled by the second. What Kalmar teaches us through his clear, jargon-free discussion of the Cobden glossaries has, I believe, much to teach all Christians about how healthy the Body of Christ might become, if true solidarity really were our aim.
Lightwind
A thorough treatment of a narrow topic. Well done. This book contributes to cross-culture understanding and how language holds barriers that are not at all obvious.
Skrimpak
This is one of the best books I've ever read. You should buy this book right away. Tomas Kalmar is an unrecognized genius in the world of bilingual literacy. This book is a must read if you're at all interested in events shaping the Americas right now. Before you've made up your mind where you stand on the issue of "secure borders," you must read Kalmar. He invokes a tradition dating back hundreds, even thousands of years, and brings it all into perspective. I can't say enough about this book or this great scholar. Did you know Alfred the Great wasn't born on the date on the famous statue in London? Who knew?
Whilingudw
Allá para el verano de 1980, en el pueblo de Cobden, Illinois, los wetbacks would pick fruit at a blistering pace, pero sus patronos se mantenían suficientemente distanciados para no crear revuelos. Everyone knew que los indocumentados rendered an invaluable service to the economic stability of the fruit-pickers market, pero el zumbido tenue-yet constant-que se generaba no dejaba de ser escudriñado by those who wanted to mend the suffering and injustice. Era necesario romper la barrera del silencio. Había que legitimizar the apparent reticence among migrant mexican workers dándoles herramientas para decodificar the seeminlgy impenetrable, iron-clad English language. El inglés, entreched in legalese and exuding una supuesta legitimidad inquebrantable, trataba de silenciar al arrullo de un español de carne y hueso que día a día clamaba por su supervivencia.
Tomás Mario Kalmar, académico, músico, historiador y maestro, documenta, con suceptibilidd y tacto, what unfolded en aquellas reuniones clandestinas where two monolingual communities redescubrían la verdadera diferencia entre el abecedario y la alfabetización. Uno de los estudiantes congregados in the dimly lit basement rompió el hielo de la primera sesión al declarar que los sonidos de un alfabeto no necesáriamente tenían que corresponder con los caracetres. Había que razonar: even though English and Spanish share the same alphabet (con la excepción de la ll y la ñ), both adhere to pronunciation keys that are radically different. Bajo la tutela de Kalmar, a new language emerged. Entre lo correcto y lo incorrecto, between the sound and the written text, una comunidad de estudiantes y maestros began to write English como de veras se oía. Hence, the Cobden Glossaries emerged líricamente. Nació, luego de interminables noches de juego y debate, un tomo lírico, suntuoso, complejo, sinewy, yet veritable, dónde la palabra juellulib nestled una verdad tan significante y legítima como la oración where do you live.
The silences que Kalmar interpreta in his manifesto son aquellos silencios que dejan atrás lo clandestino para sumergirse en lo legítimo. The migrant workers yearned for legitimacy. En esa mesa redonda in which students and teachers investigaban diversos modos de encaminarse a la comunicación, existió the possibility that silence would be pricked and made to transform itself into something dynamic and resilient, en algo que puediese reintegrar y redefinir a la comunidad.
Kieel
No mistake about it: this is a serious book about linguistics that adds much to the ongoing debates in academia . . . but it's also a good read for anyone and lots of fun if you care about words and language and the ways people learn to communicate with each other across language barriers.

If you care about human beings and social justice, this book is also for you. Biliteracy and language equality,immigration policy and how we treat migrant workers, and the whole idea of borders: as Kalmar says, "Same teacup, same storm."

This book is illuminating, thought provoking, game-changing. Brilliant.
INvait
Tomás Kalmar's book is a charming combination of personal experience and erudite scholarship, written in an engaging fashion. The author's treatment of the politics of biliteracy, from the fruit-groves of the Midwest to the halls of academe, is both passionate and clear-sighted. The alert reader will also enjoy observing evidence of Kalmar's wide-ranging interests threading through the fabric of the book, notably his fondness for music and his fascination with mathematical and proto-mathematical thinking.
GEL
I was impressed with this book not only because of Tomas Kalmar's clear mastery of the topic and knowledge of linguistics but also because of how flat out fun the book was to read: engaging and to the point, this book takes a serious look at what it's like to be a migrant worker in the US, struggling with language barriers and discrimination and highlights the strength of the Latino community. Because of the detailed linguistic content, I'm using it for a coursebook next semester. Because it's a fine read, I'm giving it as a gift to nonlinguist friends. BTW: if you happen to be English/Spanish bilingual, there are some very funny bits!
Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy: Latino Migrants Crossing the Linguistic Border download epub
Schools & Teaching
Author: Tomás Mario Kalmar
ISBN: 0805836268
Category: Education & Teaching
Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (November 1, 2000)
Pages: 144 pages