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Exploring Black Holes: Introduction to General Relativity download epub

by Edwin F. Taylor


Epub Book: 1915 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1137 kb.

With Exploring Black Holes, Taylor and Wheeler have presented the community of physics learners and teachers .

With Exploring Black Holes, Taylor and Wheeler have presented the community of physics learners and teachers with another gem. VITAE. William H. Ingham is Professor of Physics at James Madison University. Although the math as advertised was not daunting, limited to elementary calculus, I found that the book was conceptually very hard to follow.

There are a lot of books on general relativity at the superficial level, call these books 'mathless. There are monumental tomes aimed at the graduate student level, call these books 'tensor calculus. Here is a book exquisitely positioned between these others. The book ends with: 'How can physics live up to its true greatness except by a new revolution in outlook which dwarfs all past revolutions?

Authored by Oersted Medal winner Edwin Taylor and foremost relativist John Archibald Wheeler, this unique book offers a concise, directed examination of general relativity and black holes.

Authored by Oersted Medal winner Edwin Taylor and foremost relativist John Archibald Wheeler, this unique book offers a concise, directed examination of general relativity and black holes. Its goal is to provide tools that motivate students to become active participants in carrying out their own investigations about curved spacetime near Earth and black holes.

Introduction to General Relativity,. Black Holes, and Cosmology. General Relativity: An Introduction for Physicists provides a clear mathematical introduction. Get Top Trending Free Books in Your Inbox. 9 MB·13,698 Downloads. Introduction to Food and Food Processing. 22 MB·4,099 Downloads. Food processing techniques (Minimal processing Technologies, humans or animals either in the home TRAINING MANUAL FOR. Ask yourself: Am I achieving the goals that I’ve set for myself?

Exploring Black Holes book. Start by marking Exploring Black Holes: Introduction to General Relativity as Want to Read

Exploring Black Holes book. A concise, direct examination of general relativity and black. Start by marking Exploring Black Holes: Introduction to General Relativity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Exploración de los hoyos negros en el cosmos aplicando la teoría de la relatividad, no de adentra en el campo de las ecuaciones de Einstein solamente describe las órbitas y su cálculo, son las soluciones primarias que muestran la curvatura del espacio-tiempo  . The result introduces the idea that if gravity curves spacetime, perhaps curved spacetime can ripple in such a way as to create a gravitational wave that tells us what happened to two black holes . billion years ago. View.

Edwin F. Taylor, and John Archibald Wheeler. Exploring Black Holes: Introduction to General Relativity. Addison Wesley Longman, 2000. Thorne, Kip. Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy. 1. Introduction to the Class.

Exploring Black Holes Introduction to General Relativity.

A concise, direct examination of general relativity and black holes, Exploring Black Holes provides tools that motivate tools that motivate readers to become active participants in carrying out their own investigations about curved spacetime near earth and black holes. The authors use calculus and algebra to make general relativity accessible, and use quotes from well-known personalities, including Einstein, to offer further insight. Five chapters introduce basic theory. The book also includes seven projects regarding the analysis of major applications. Discussions provide the background needed to carry out projects. The book's projects guide readers as they fill in steps, compute outcomes and carry out their own investigations. For astronomers, mathematicians and people interested in learning about the relativity of black holes.


Comments: (7)

Wafi
I am a graduate student in physics and I like reading books for undergraduates like this one. I've learned more from this book than from the 'bible' MTW or from the usual superficial graduate courses in GR that boil down to 'index gymnastics' whithout conceptual depth.

The dominant theme in the book is spherically symmetric noncharged and nonrotating black holes described by the Schwartzschild metric. Only the last two projects deal with rotating black holes and cosmological metrics. The book covers only a small application chapter of GR so don't expect to see the Einstein equations or tensors (there isn't a single one).

It took me a month to read the book and do all the exercises which I found easy most of the time since they come with pretty detailed instructions how to solve them. You will need to know a little special relativity and calculus so it is completely within the reach of an undergrad. Also the authors prefer to work directly with the differentials in the metric instead of using 4-vectors, scalar producst and components - that is more natural for most beginners. You can see the 4-vector approach in more advanced books (still for beginners) like James Hartle's "Introduction to general relativity".

The Schwartzschild metric is stated without derivation. Then you are introduced to 3 different observers around the black hole and their measurements. You will use a variational principle called in the book 'Principle of extremal aging', to derive the orbits of bodies and light rays around the black hole and constants of motion like energy and angular momentum. The radial motion is tackled through 'effective potential', the angular motion through the angular momentum.

At the end of the book you will begin to understand how to tackle a general metric: how to interpret its coordinates in terms of measurements performed by different observers, how the constants of motions are connected to symmetries in the metric, how to get the constants of motion with the variational principle and so on...

Besides all that, you will learn a bunch of wonderfull facts about black holes that will make you a star at a nerd's party :) Can you cross the horizon and what is seen by different observers, the time from the moment your body feels uncomfortable till the moment you reach the center of the black hole, how the night sky looks close to the black hole and so on.

Some of the projects in the book calculate the hystorical experimental proofs of GR: bending of light near sun, precession of mercury's orbit and so on. The projects contain queries that you have to fill in reading the text. The solutions of these are usually shorter than the questions themselves :)

My only objection is that sometimes the book makes statements without justification. For example, it is enogh to say that the principle of extremal aging like every principle is a statement in agreement with the experiment that can't be proven, we just know it works but don't know why. Instead of explaining that, the book states the principle several times wasting paper to my opinion and you still don't understand where that principle comes from. Repeating statements without proper explanation is equivalent to brain-washing and just makes the text unnecessary bulky and inefficient.

UPDATE for the authors [6 Nov 2007]: What I meant with the above paragraph is that while the 'principle of extremal aging' can be shown to follow from the assumptions/axioms in the context of Special Relativity (like in the twin paradox), in GR it is postulated by analogy, not proven. Sections 3.1 and 3.2 illustrate the principle but are not explicit enough about its origin in GR.

For sins like that I gave it 4/5. Keep in mind I am a pretty demanding reader and I give 5/5 only to masterpieces like some books of David Griffiths where you can see the authour applied great effort to streamline the logic and clearly justify it to the reader.
Laitchai
I have not yet finished reading this book but my excitement over its brilliance forces me to comment. This book is shear magic in its ability to explain very difficult and strange phenomena in an intuitive and simple way. I have read the authors' book SpaceTime Physics as well as GR by Schutz and can do the tensors and all that; yet I am in awe of the ability these authors have of succeding at the near impossible. Using the study of black holes as the motivation for GR study is perfect. I love the choice of the variational principle to cut to the heart of the math. I recommend this book to anyone for self-study who has a smattering of calculus (not much is really needed). I am looking forward to studying Kip Thorne's membrane paradign book next. Gentlemen, kudos in the highest!
Musical Aura Island
I have been searching for an introductory book on general relativity suitable for an individual, of average ability, studying on his own, with a grasp of basic calculus. I was, therefore, looking for a book at the undergraduate level. I was very excited when I read some reviews of Exploring Black Holes: Introduction to General Relativity. From the reviews, it seemed to be an ideal introductory (but mathematically quantitative) book on the subject. Although the math as advertised was not daunting, limited to elementary calculus, I found that the book was conceptually very hard to follow. The book started employing an equation from special relativity that I had not seen in standard books on that subject. Moreover, contrary to standard physics, mixed units, e.g., units of length, time, mass, etc., were added indiscriminately, without any discussion of how this could be legitimate. Still, the book seemed intellectually very interesting and provocative; however, if the basic concepts are not understandable, at least to me, that does not do me any good. I understand that a new edition of the book will be coming out at the end of November, 2012. Perhaps the issues raised here, will be addressed in the new edition?
Raniconne
This book sidesteps the hard work needed to motivate and develop the Einstein field equations, and goes directly to one of the most important solutions of the equations, the Schwarzschild solution, which gives rise to the concept of a black hole. By exploring what observers in different parts of space-time would experience along their different trajectories (whether falling into a black hole or watching from a safe spot far away), Taylor and Wheeler manage to convey an intuitive understanding for such typical GR "paradoxes" such as the fact that the same "event" (the crossing over of an object through the event horizon) can be seen to take 15 minutes, or forever, depending on who's watching it.

Because of what it omits, this book is not a complete presentation of GR. It does present the most fun part of GR, however, in a way that is mathematically accessible.

Along the way, a few side questions are adddressed, like "How painful would it be to be squished/torn apart as I fall into a black hole?" A lot of time is also spent explaining how the weird trajectories of light within the event horizon will transmogrify what is seen by the observer.

This is a great book and a lot of fun. I am also left with a greater motivation to go back to a more complete presentation, to be convinced that "this is where you have to end up". Although much longer, this book is a worthy successor to the original output of this dynamic duo, "Spacetime Physics".
Danskyleyn
Great book for an introduction to General Relativity. There is no tensor analysis, but everything is developed rigorously showing how and to what extent a curved spacetime can be approximated by a series of inertial frames. In this way, the authors are able to rigorously explain the proper motion of Mercury, the principle that governs the GPS, the Einstein Rings and more.
Exploring Black Holes: Introduction to General Relativity download epub
Engineering
Author: Edwin F. Taylor
ISBN: 020138423X
Category: Engineering & Transportation
Subcategory: Engineering
Language: English
Publisher: Addison Wesley Longman; 1 edition (July 22, 2000)
Pages: 352 pages