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Fire: The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution download epub

by Frances D. Burton


Epub Book: 1281 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1798 kb.

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Fire: The Spark That Igni. has been added to your Cart. Just like the Greek myth this excellent work by anthropologist Frances Burton makes the point that the dubious gift of fire was not without its consequences in terms of human evolution and indeed may have been the very force to actually spur the evolutionary forces that made humans acquire their particular qualities.

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Chapter 1: Burning Bright Gracie was a chimp at the primate center at Holloman Air Force Base. An old female, but still perky, she had been sent to Holloman from a circus, and remembered all the things she had learned, and I guess, enjoyed in that human environment. One of those things was a keen appreciation of tobacco. The chimps lived across a moat from the rest of the Base, and Gracie would come to the moat, and vocalize at whoever was standing nearby.

A study of factors that have an influence on the ignition risk at the extraction is made. Two main factors appear: heat release rate and ventilation flow. These factors are studied by changing.

Humans (species in the genus homo) are the only animals that cook their food and . Frances D. Burton (2009) Fire: The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution, University of New Mexico Press, ISBN 978-0-8263-4646-9.

Humans (species in the genus homo) are the only animals that cook their food and Wrangham argues Homo erectus emerged about two million years ago as a result of this unique trait. Cooking had profound evolutionary effect because it increased food efficiency which allowed human ancestors to spend less time foraging, chewing, and digesting. H. erectus developed a smaller, more efficient digestive tract which freed up energy to enable larger brain growth.

Catching Fire How Cooking Made Us Human by Richard Wrangham Basic Books, New York, 2009. In their books, Wrangham and Burton present two quite different perspectives on how learning to control fire may have played a crucial role in human evolution. Fire The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution by Frances D. Burton University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 2009. Citation Manager Formats.

The association between our ancestors and fire, somewhere around six to four million years ago, had a tremendous impact. Her study examines the natural occurrence of fire and describes the effects light has on human physiology.

Written by Frances D. Burton, Audiobook narrated by Michael Scherer. Fire: The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution. By: Frances D. Burton. Narrated by: Michael Scherer.

Frances D. Burton (2009) Fire: The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution, University of New Mexico Press .

Control of fire by early humans. Evolution of the brain. Category:Anthropology books Category:Profile Books books Category:2009 non-fiction books.

How Humans and Apes Are Different, and Why It Matters.

Fire: The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution. How Humans and Apes Are Different, and Why It Matters. Narco-heritage and the Touristification of the Drug Lord Pablo Escobar in Medellin, Colombia.

The association between our ancestors and fire, somewhere around six to four million years ago, had a tremendous impact on human evolution, transforming our earliest human ancestor, a being communicating without speech but with insight, reason, manual dexterity, highly developed social organization, and the capability of experimenting with this new technology. As it first associated with and then began to tame fire, this extraordinary being began to distance itself from its primate relatives, taking a path that would alter its environment, physiology, and self-image.

Based on her extensive research with nonhuman primates, anthropologist Frances Burton details the stages of the conquest of fire and the systems it affected. Her study examines the natural occurrence of fire and describes the effects light has on human physiology. She constructs possible variations of our earliest human ancestor and its way of life, utilizing archaeological and anthropological evidence of the earliest human-controlled fires to explore the profound physical and biological impacts fire had on human evolution.


Comments: (4)

avanger
I bought this book with great interest and enthusiasm and read it completely. I was rather disappointed by its content. The author unintentionally repeats herself all along the chapters of the book, turning the pages boring. It has some clues about the origin of fire and how humans beings used it. Nevertheless the flame of "Fire" is not high. Many other questions or reasons about fire could be better addressed like the changes of teeth, bowels, and even brain volume increased due to the control of fire by our ancestor. Even folk tales, and religious use of fire could be nicely emphasized to enrich it. "Fire" half lighted my fire.

Yvens Barbosa Fernandes
Humin
The ideas presented are interesting, but highly speculative, IMHO. I would say this book is much more along the lines of "it could have been" than "we know it was."

I suggest checking out Camilla Power's review in the May 2011 edition of The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute first, so determine if Fire: The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution is the right book for you.
Celore
According to Greek mythology Prometheus stole fire from the Gods and gave it to man.

For this service, Zeus punished Prometheus with the dubious gift of foresight.

Just like the Greek myth this excellent work by anthropologist Frances Burton makes the point that the dubious gift of fire was not without its consequences in terms of human evolution and indeed may have been the very force to actually spur the evolutionary forces that made humans acquire their particular qualities. (NOTE: Where this review uses the term "human" it means to include all hominid ancestors as well as contemporary living humans, their descendants.)

Starting at the beginning, Burton goes back six million years to when humans broke off from chimpanzees and bonoboos. She noted that even today chimpanzees and bonoboos do not show a fear of fire when insects are accidentally caught in it. The chimpanzees and bonoboos know that by quickly reaching between the flames they can snag a good treat. In an interesting aside on this very point, Burton favorably compares certain insects with more traditional fare to show how they actually provide more nutrition (a fact admittedly that still does little to inspire me to eat insects but still has interesting evolutionary consequences).

Building from the accidental to the more purposeful Burton posits an evolutionary theory wherein our ancestors came to purposefully capture fire and then to create it. Unlike the popular movie Quest for Fire, this process according to Burton doesn't recess tens of thousands of years into history but rather millions of years into history.

I really like this book for a variety of reasons:

Firstly, like Bickerton's Language and Species, this book shows the natural evolution of a human trait from behaviors that naturally would have occured among our ancestors and therefore follows the Darwinian dictate that human behaviors are different only in quality rather than in their inherent nature.

Secondly, this book dovetails neatly with that other prominent 2009 release on fire Cooking with Fire which discusses the ways in which nutritionally cooked food came to alter human brain power (viz: more readily produceable nutritious meals enabled humans to apply their intellectual skills to things other than mere survival...the very definition of "brain food").

Thirdly, this book boldly suggests that the control of fire enabled humans to control their environment and litterally conquer night. In that way, one can come to see the human control of fire as a first step that would ultimately lead to human occupation of all terrestrial environments and even forays into space itself.
Jorad
This is a hard slog. The book is very ambitious. The author is frank in that on some important points, her point of view is just that and it disagrees often enough with Wrangham's new book on this topic. The book is very rich, bringing in the latest research in fields that have (it would seem) just been christened. The thoroughness and the persistence pay off; the book is a real intellectual tour-de-force and a rewarding read.
Fire: The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution download epub
Engineering
Author: Frances D. Burton
ISBN: 0826346464
Category: Engineering & Transportation
Subcategory: Engineering
Language: English
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press (April 16, 2009)
Pages: 248 pages