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I Don't Want to Be Inside Me Anymore: Messages From an Autistic Mind download epub

by Birger Sellin


Epub Book: 1355 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1928 kb.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Birger became the centre of often volatile Birger Sellin was the first functionally non-verbal person with autism to become a published author in Germany.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

When Birger was born in 1973, the ironic claim that "little about autism was known in Germany" at the time is all the more reason to question the veracity of this book. Niko and Elisabeth Tinbergen's writings are cited and they, too have touted questionable claims. They support the asinine and disproved "refrigerator parent" theory and claim that forcing people with autism to endure hugs against their will is a sure-fire cure, which it most emphatically is not. If such were the case, then "curing" autism would have a 100% success rate!

Purportedly revealing compositions of an autistic young man who has been mute since . A theory this debatable requires stronger proof than this book offers.

Purportedly revealing compositions of an autistic young man who has been mute since age two; skeptics will view them otherwise. Sellin, who was born in Germany in 1973 and lives with his parents in Berlin, was introduced to facilitated communication when he was 17. In this technique, the autistic person sits at a keyboard while his hand is physically supported and guided by someone else. The question, of course, is how much influence the facilitator has on the end result.

Sellin has been a contributing author to other publications since then He became the centre of an often volatile controversy about the use of facilitated communication as a valid form of communication for functionally non-verbal people with autism.

Sellin has been a contributing author to other publications since then.

Birger Sellin (born 1973) is the first functionally non-verbal autistic person to become a published author in Germany.

The Entanglement of Race and Disability, Metaphilosophy, 40(3–4) (July): 531–51. Stubblefield, Anna 2011. Real People, Regular Lives: Autism, Communication & Quality of Life (Autism National Committee).

Judged incurably autistic, mute since the age of two, Sellin astonished the world when, at the age of 18, he began to. .Das erste Buch von Birger Sellin wirkt anfangs sehr verwirrend und vielleicht sogar fremdartig auf den Leser.

Judged incurably autistic, mute since the age of two, Sellin astonished the world when, at the age of 18, he began to express himself in writing, pouring out thoughts and feelings that no one suspected he understood. Mit der Zeit lernt man seine Sprache kennen und bemerkt genau durch diese, dass seine kommunikative Entwicklung große Fortschritte in dem Zeitraum gemacht hat.

Born in Germany in 1973, Sellin was a happy child, but shortly before turning two, he suddenly grew terrified of other children, stopped talking & retreated into a dark & lonely world for the next 16 years. Although autistic, he taught himself to read & then began to type -- he was now able to express himself & he developed increased control. This book is a firsthand account of rare eloquence & immediacy, a remarkable story of raw human courage & -- ultimately -- indomitable hope. "Birger has broken through a wall between unbearable worlds, & what he has written is nothing other than the poetry of the human soul." "Texts of a bizarre beauty."

Comments: (5)

Brajind
The opening of this book annoyed me. The very statements that people on the autism/Asperger's (a/A) spectrum don't relate to others and that nothing registers are not only illogical, but are harmful fallacies. People with autism, which is a neurobiological condition have difficulty communicating and responding to sensory stimuli based on the severity of the condition. Suggesting that nothing registers with people who have autism is a crock.

I also didn't like the way people with autism were compared to Rain Man. Seriously, I wish that 1988 movie had never been made because I am really sick of the savant stereotype being dumped on the autistic population! The term "Rain Man" has become a slur in many a/A circles for this very reason. The irony of it all is that savantism only affects less than 10% of people with autism! I also wish I had an umbrella with the Autism Puzzle design, with the logo "Rain Man Busters" to ward off these tired misstatements. Saying one knows about autism based on one fictitious character is tantamount to saying that one is a gourmet chef because they watched one program about cooking!

Tired, disproved myths about autism such as refusal to speak due to trauma and having no desire to communicate were rampant throughout this book. Bull manure! The desire to communicate is inherent in all people regardless of neurobiology and autism affects that part of people's lives. The irony of it all is that Dr. Asperger, the man who first described this form of autism in 1944 wrote many works IN GERMAN about it as well as its spectrum partner, autism. When Birger was born in 1973, the ironic claim that "little about autism was known in Germany" at the time is all the more reason to question the veracity of this book. Niko and Elisabeth Tinbergen's writings are cited and they, too have touted questionable claims. They support the asinine and disproved "refrigerator parent" theory and claim that forcing people with autism to endure hugs against their will is a sure-fire cure, which it most emphatically is not. If such were the case, then "curing" autism would have a 100% success rate!

Many parts of this book really bothered me. The "facilitated communication" technique is praised throughout the book as the key to Birger Sellin, an individual with severe autism. Sellin is nonverbal and has allegedly been able to communicate via poetry through this method.

There are too many unanswered questions about facilitated communication. This book fails to mention that in the majority of cases, the facilitator's hand is typing the messages and that it is the facilitator's thoughts that are being expressed, not those of the person with autism. In 99% of the controlled studies performed on this method of communication have shown this to be the case. In many instances, the facilitator forcibly holds the person with autism's hand down on the keys to make it appear that the the person with autism is doing the typing.

Small wonder Sellin's meltdowns and extreme frustration appear to be exacerbated since the advent of facilitated communication in his life. One wonders if Sellin is actually doing the typing. At no time are these questions addressed in this book.

Don't just take this with a grain of salt. Take it with a whole BOX of salt!
Bukus
The world of facilitated communication is certainly one of controversy and Birger's writing add to that controversy. But FC has been used for years with those with impulse control disorders who have Cerebral Palsy. Many in that group were considered for decades to be mentall retarded and incapable of their communications using assisted typing as is the case with FC. The real question is not whether FC is a valid communication for some people but whether, like those with CP, some severely autistic people can be deemed to have impulse control disorders such as Dyspraxia, OCD or Tourette's and this is certainly the case that whilst many, especially at the more able end of the spectrum, do not, others certainly do. The other question is whether someone with Autism who has a severe impulse control disorder can also be as intelligent, deep and artistic as any person with CP who uses FC to express the same things. Quite simply, if we assume they don't then we are committing the same sin society committed in the dark past against those with CP and the deaf. Whatever you think of the politics or your own take on autism, it is still possible to acknowlege that someone with a severe impulse control disorder and autism may feel they suffer more from their autism than someone who does have control of their body, their movements, their communication. Birger's poetry in that context is an appeal to humanity to listen to a trapped intelligence and passion. If we put our politics aside, maybe we'll here not the disability, but the person.
Brick my own
The opening of this book really irritated me. The very statements that people on the autism/Asperger's (a/A) spectrum don't relate to others and that nothing registers are not only illogical, but are harmful fallacies. People with autism, which is a neurobiological condition have difficulty communicating and responding to stimuli based on the severity of the condition. Suggesting that nothing registers with people who have autism is a crock.

I also didn't like the way people with autism were compared to Rain Man. Seriously, I wish that 1988 movie had never been made because I am really sick of the savant stereotype being dumped on the autistic population! The term "Rain Man" has become a slur in many a/A circles for this very reason. The irony of it all is that savantism only affects less than 10% of people with autism! I also wish I had an umbrella with the Autism Puzzle design, with the logo "Rain Man Busters" to ward off these tired misstatements. Saying one knows about autism based on one fictitious character is tantamount to saying that one has been to Paris when they've only been to Charles De Gaulle Airport!

Tired, disproved myths about autism such as refusal to speak due to trauma and having no desire to communicate were rampant throughout this book. Bull manure! The desire to communicate is inherent in all people regardless of neurobiology and autism affects that part of people's lives. The irony of it all is that Dr. Asperger, the man who first described this form of autism in 1944 wrote many works IN GERMAN about it as well as its spectrum partner, autism. When Birger was born in 1973, the ironic claim that "little about autism was known in Germany" at the time is all the more reason to question the veracity of this book. Niko and Elisabeth Tinbergen's writings are cited and they, too have touted questionable claims. They support the asinine and disproved "refrigerator parent" theory and claim that forcing people with autism to endure hugs against their will is a sure-fire cure, which it most emphatically is not. If such were the case, then "curing" autism would have a 100% success rate!

Many parts of this book really bothered me. The "facilitated communication" technique is praised throughout the book as the key to Birger Sellin, an individual with severe autism. Sellin is nonverbal and has allegedly been able to communicate via poetry through this method.

There are too many unanswered questions about facilitated communication. This book fails to mention that in the majority of cases, the facilitator's hand is typing the messages and that it is the facilitator's thoughts that are being expressed, not those of the person with autism. In 99% of the controlled studies performed on this method of communication have shown this to be the case. In many instances, the facilitator forcibly holds the person with autism's hand down on the keys to make it appear that the the person with autism is doing the typing.

Small wonder Sellin's meltdowns and extreme frustration appear to be exacerbated since the advent of facilitated communication in his life. One wonders if Sellin is actually doing the typing. At no time are these questions addressed in this book.

Don't just take this with a grain of salt. Take it with a whole BOX of salt!
I Don't Want to Be Inside Me Anymore: Messages From an Autistic Mind download epub
Diseases & Physical Ailments
Author: Birger Sellin
ISBN: 0788157043
Category: Health, Fitness & Dieting
Subcategory: Diseases & Physical Ailments
Language: English
Publisher: Basic Books (January 1, 1995)
Pages: 227 pages