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Beyond Ritalin:Facts About Medication and Strategies for Helping Children,: Adolescents, and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorders download epub

by Robyn Freedman Spizman


Epub Book: 1263 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1504 kb.

Robyn Freedman Spizman is the author and coauthor of numerous parenting, educational, and how-to books. A motivational speaker, she has lectured to thousands about balancing family and work and getting organized.

Robyn Freedman Spizman is the author and coauthor of numerous parenting, educational, and how-to books. She has appeared on radio and television, including the Today show, CNN's Parenting Today, the Discovery Channel, CNBC, and Home Matters.

book by Robyn Freedman Spizman.

The book should of course be an aid, not a substitute for diagnosis and treatment by qualified physicians.

The purpose of this book is to explain to parents the present understanding of this problem and the best techniques for its management. The book should of course be an aid, not a substitute for diagnosis and treatment by qualified physicians dealing with their hyperactive children.

Robyn Freedman Spizman. Her parents were concerned because she was having difficulty paying attention and keeping up with the workload in high school. What do we do? asked her mom. MICHAEL PITT is an up-and-coming lawyer. He had to struggle through law school, but made it.

by Robyn Freedman Spizman.

Books related to Beyond Ritalin:Facts About Medication and Strategies for Helping Children, Skip this list. Books related to Beyond Ritalin:Facts About Medication and Strategies for Helping Children, Skip this list.

In Beyond Ritalin the team that wrote Is Your Child Hyperactive? takes a close look at what medication can and cannot do for those with ADHD, and explains in full detail the behavioral and other strategies that have been developed in the past 15 years to successfully cope with this complex and confu. We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer.

By Robyn Freedman Spizman

By Robyn Freedman Spizman.

In Beyond Ritalin the team that wrote Is Your Child Hyperactive? takes a close look at what medication can and cannot do for those with ADHD, and explains in full detail the behavioral and other strategies that have been developed in the past 15 years to successfully cope with this complex and confusing disorder.

Comments: (6)

Hirah
Great book for alternatives to Ritalin
snowball
One evening when a coworker was studying for a CEU course on ADHD, I happened to peruse the text she was using for her course. It contained a lengthy list of behavioral symptoms for the sufferers of ADHD, and I suddenly realized that an acquaintance exhibited nearly all of them. When I mentioned it to the individual, they replied that they'd always thought that they had the disorder, but that it had never been diagnosed. Since it was obviously very disruptive of their life, I decided to do a little research to see if I could find out anything that might conceivably help.
Although "Nature's Ritalin for the Marathon Mind" was my first book (chosen since it dealt with the use of physical exercise in helping focus the sufferer) the book "Beyond Ritalin" by Garber, Garber, and Spizman was my second. What I found especially impressive was that the authors did not espouse any given method of treatment. They were not "all for' or "completely against" medication as a method of approach, and they were up-front with what medication could and could not do for the sufferer of ADHD.
More than anything the authors made it obvious that ADHD is a DIAGNOSIS and NOT AN EXCUSE. It is not an excuse for the sufferer to "drop out" of the world or give up because it's "hopeless" and certainly not an excuse for parents to give up on parenting the child with ADHD just because he/she is "on medication" or "impossible."
The discussion of the various types of medications available was very honest, describing potential side effects, variation in individual response, and effective limitations. Most importantly, as they point out in some of their section headings: "Medication does not teach socially acceptable behavior (p. 130)," "Medication does not help ADHD youth or adults feel happier (p. 130)," "Medication does not teach reflective thinking (p. 144)," "Medication does not teach you how to control where to focus attention (p. 145)," "Medication does not make the individual organized (p. 161)," "Medication doesn't improve self-esteem or self-confidence (p. 206)," etc. In short, both the sufferers and their families have a lot of work to do, and it's hard work. However, not to do that work is to spend the rest of ones life spinning ones wheels.
Among the suggestions for treatment of the disorder are those that the authors have found effective in their clinical practice. Their observations about complications arising from learning disorders and skills deficits were very cogent. Certainly the individual suffering already from ADHD is beat before they start until learning problems are addressed and missed skills are remedied possibly with the aid of special tutors.
Suggestions for behavioral training (with respect to remembering things, completing projects, organizing the environment and ones day) were all very helpful as were the social skills training for individuals who have difficulty making friends and "fitting in." The problems with task commitment and test taking were especially informative. The authors' point out that many individuals can do the work but may find testing situations frustrating and overwhelming. I especially found the hints about limiting and defining the task, sometimes even visually (by covering part of a page with a piece of paper) were helpful, as were those offered for developing organizational skills. As they write with respect to the latter, "Most people find getting organized difficult. The difference is that whereas most people can get away with being disorganized, those with ADHD cannot. Since ADHD people are easily distracted, disorganization can 'do them in (p.173).'"
The authors also point out that living with ADHD can be very stressful and irritating. Their chapter "Taming the Tiger Within" points out that medication can be somewhat lumpy in its effects throughout the day. It also may make the person look and act calmer, but may leave them actually feeling just as they always do. They can listen better, accomplish more, get better grades, but still not feel calm or relaxed. The authors suggest some progressive relaxation training, or imagery: "Relaxation exercises remain one of the best ways to manage symptoms of ADHD and to permit the individual to acquire feelings of control (p. 186)."
The last chapter pertains to ADHD among adults. Here the authors note that ADHD is not a disorder that the sufferer just "grows out of with time" but continues to effect the individual into adulthood. Most significant are the findings that in adulthood the outcomes of the disorder do not seem to be distinguishable between those individuals treated with medication as children and those who were not. It seems that multidimensional treatment modalities have a greater chance of improving outcomes and that it's never too late to get help.
Vispel
This book provided little help to us in the years we were desperate for assistance.

For one thing, it focuses to narrowly on the ADHD as a disease, and not nearly enough on the possible causes. For another, the book completely dismisses the fact that by the time most parents get around to using Ritalin for their kids, they have already tried all the behavioral modifications suggested in this volume. We certainly did, to the extent of hiring a private physician to observe our child in the classroom and carefully lay out strategies to help the teacher and school staff constructively contend with our child's issues.

Now it is certainly true that medication is NOT a be all and end all, and most parents who do put their children on Ritalin or other stimulants, do so with the hope that they can eventually develop coping strategies that will enable them to function without the medication.

Having said that, however, behavioral modification is no more a be all and end all than the medication! And in some cases, for a host of reasons, it simply does not work on its own.

Sure, it is important to teach children the proper rules of behavior and conduct. Of course, medication cannot do that. But for heavens sakes, does anyone really think that it would? We certainly did not, and in the same way, we were open to considering anything that showed proven efficacy in dealing with the medical realities.

One of those, which few medical doctors discuss, is neuro-biofeedback, of both the eeg and heg varieties, which we have found exceedingly helpful. and continue to use. Doctors, too, should expand their horizons---not only beyond medication, but beyond behavior modification.

Diet and vitamins are also important factors, for example, considering that the human brain continues to grow and develop until a person is about in his or her mid 20s. That's another thing this book does not discuss, and very few physicians mentioned to us, either. But nutrition is very very important.
Nahn
This is an excellent, well-balanced book for parents, or anyone else who works or lives with a child with ADHD.
What I found particularly helpful in this book were some of the excercises the author described to help children with ADHD compensate for their restlessness, impulsiveness and distractability.
They recommends the children's game "statues" to help a child stay still longer. A stopwatch is used in most of the activities, and the goal is to "beat the clock". With statues the goal is to see how long the child can hold their "statue" position. While playing a game, the child is also practising standing still.
There is a lot of good information about medication in this book. The author is neither for or against medication, but instead provides good information on what medication can and can't do.
As a parent of a child with ADHD, I found this a very useful book.
Humin
If we had put our daughter on ritalin she would have gone into a full blown manic attack. She was diagnosed with depression with ADD as a side-effect. If you look carefully at the DSM-IV criteria for either depression or a BiPolar disorder it is easy to see how the classic symptoms of mania or depression can be misdiagnosed as ADHD/ADD. There is a current study out that shows that nearly most of the children diagnosed as bipolar have ADHD/ADD as a co-existing condition and if mistreated with a stimulant like ritalin, can further push a child into mania.
Beyond Ritalin:Facts About Medication and Strategies for Helping Children,: Adolescents, and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorders download epub
Psychology & Counseling
Author: Robyn Freedman Spizman
ISBN: 0679450181
Category: Health, Fitness & Dieting
Subcategory: Psychology & Counseling
Language: English
Publisher: Villard; 1 edition (April 23, 1996)
Pages: 255 pages