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The Civil War in North Carolina download epub

by John G. Barrett


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Many North Carolina students of Civil War history, reading that quote, will know at once that the speaker, unidentified by. .

Many North Carolina students of Civil War history, reading that quote, will know at once that the speaker, unidentified by Barrett, is future Governor Zebulon B. Vance. As mentioned above, John Barrett’s "The Civil War in North Carolina" is relatively old-school history; if what was once called the new social history is your thing, you will not find it in this book.

During the American Civil War, North Carolina joined the Confederacy with some reluctance, mainly because neighboring Virginia had done so, and it remained a divided state throughout the wa.

During the American Civil War, North Carolina joined the Confederacy with some reluctance, mainly because neighboring Virginia had done so, and it remained a divided state throughout the war, with much of the population of the Appalachian Mountains in the western part of the state retaining Union sentiment

Eleven battles and seventy-three skirmishes were fought in North Carolina during the Civil Wa.

Eleven battles and seventy-three skirmishes were fought in North Carolina during the Civil War. Although the number of men involved in many of these engagements was comparatively small, the campaigns and battles themselves were crucial in the grand strategy of the conflict and involved some of the most famous generals of the war. John Barrett presents the complete story of military engagements across the state, including the classical pitched battle of Bentonville, the siege of Fort Fisher, the amphibious campaigns on the coast, and cavalry sweeps such as Stoneman's raid.

This collection of primary source material chronicles the Civil War experiences of North Carolinians from the secession crisis to the Confederate surrender at Bennett Place. In contrast to other works on the Civil War, this book focuses not on military events but on the larger issue of the societal costs of such conflicts.

North Carolina - History - Civil War, 1861-1865, United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Campaigns. Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on December 10, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

John Barrett presents the complete story of military engagements across the state, including the classical pitched battle of Bentonville, the siege of Fort Fisher, the amphibious . Books related to The Civil War in North Carolina.

John Barrett presents the complete story of military engagements across the state, including the classical pitched battle of Bentonville, the siege of Fort Fisher, the amphibious campaigns on the coast, and cavalry sweeps such as Stoneman's raid. From and through North Carolina, men and supplies went to Lee's army in Virginia, making the Tar Heel state critical to Lee's ability to remain in the field during the closing months of the war, when the Union had cut off the West and Gulf South.

Of North Carolina, 1975. B&W Illustrations. DJ spine is browned and has two small chips at top ISBN: 0807808741 (North Carolina, Civil War, Campaigns). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Delouvrier, Christian. Mastering Simplicity: A Life In The Kitchen.

Eleven battles and seventy-three skirmishes were fought in North Carolina during the Civil War.

The Civil War in North Carolina. Charlotte, North Carolina: A Brief History. Surprisingly, only once has a concise history been undertaken. In 1987, the North Carolina Department of Archives and History published Dr. John G. Barrett’s North Carolina as a Civil War Battleground.

Barrett is the Expert on Civil War in North Carolina. com User, December 1, 2003. An excellent telling of the Civil War in North Carolina. Full of information that is difficult to find anywhere else. Barrett writes all that happens to North Carolina in this book from Burnsides fascinating attack on Roanoke Island that is composed of the first amphibious landing and with fascinating Confederate errors to the end when Sherman slides through North Carolina shadowed by Johnson's army with Hardee, Mclaws and Bragg. The complicated picture of North Carolina during the war is told in a detailed, interesting, and validated manner.

Eleven battles and seventy-three skirmishes were fought in North Carolina during the Civil War. Although the number of men involved in many of these engagements was comparatively small, the campaigns and battles themselves were crucial in the grand strategy of the conflict and involved some of the most famous generals of the war. John Barrett presents the complete story of military engagements across the state, including the classical pitched battle of Bentonville, the siege of Fort Fisher, the amphibious campaigns on the coast, and cavalry sweeps such as Stoneman's raid. From and through North Carolina, men and supplies went to Lee's army in Virginia, making the Tar Heel state critical to Lee's ability to remain in the field during the closing months of the war, when the Union had cut off the West and Gulf South. This dependence upon North Carolina led to Stoneman's cavalry raid and Sherman's march through the state in 1865, the latter of which brought the horrors of total war and eventual defeat.

Comments: (7)

Cordanius
The Civil War history of North Carolina is a tangled thing indeed. An Upper South state, North Carolina initially resisted secession – even voted against secession while Lower South states were leaving the Union. And yet, once North Carolina *did* leave the Union and join the Confederacy, “no state contributed more to the Southern cause in men, money, and supplies” (p. 29); and a man in Mitchell County expressed well the feeling of many of the state’s residents when he said that “when the war come, I felt awful southern” (p. 182). It is a complex story, and historian John Barrett tells it well in "The Civil War in North Carolina."

Barrett, of the Virginia Military Institute, was well-qualified to tell the story of the Civil War in the Tar Heel State. In a preface, he explains that his prior work on an earlier book, "Sherman’s March Through the Carolinas" (1956), made him aware of the need for a state-level study of North Carolina’s Civil War history generally. Barrett’s book possesses a strong narrative sweep and extensive primary-source documentation, and it is likely to possess a particular appeal for North Carolina readers who want to learn more about this aspect of their state’s history.

The more familiar one already is with North Carolina’s Civil War history, the more likely one is to enjoy this book. Early in the book, Barrett speaks of “[a] western North Carolina politician” recalling how he was in the midst of giving a public speech against secession when he heard of President Lincoln’s call for 75,000 troops to suppress the rebellion; hearing that news, the politician reflects, “When my hand came down from that impassioned gesticulation…it fell slowly and sadly by the side of a secessionist” (p. 13). Many North Carolina students of Civil War history, reading that quote, will know at once that the speaker, unidentified by Barrett, is future Governor Zebulon B. Vance.

Successive chapters of the book deal with topics like the Union Navy’s expedition against the Outer Banks and capture of strategic points like Roanoke Island, Fort Macon, and New Bern; the ironclad C.S.S. Albemarle’s successful defense of coastal sound waters, until its destruction by a daring Union commando; the fighting over Fort Fisher, the fortification that defended the city of Wilmington, last port of the Confederacy; and various features of Union General William T. Sherman’s march through the state, including the Battle of Bentonville (the largest Civil War battle ever fought in the state), as well as Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston’s eventual surrender to Sherman at Bennett Place – the largest troop surrender of the Civil War.

"The Civil War in North Carolina" was published in 1963 – 100 years after the Battle of Gettysburg, in the midst of the Civil War Centennial, at a time when the American reading public’s appetite for Civil War-related material seemed inexhaustible. Yet it was also a time when the problems of race that had caused the Civil War were distinctly unresolved in American life. In April of that year, Martin Luther King Jr. was imprisoned in Birmingham for campaigning against segregation laws of that city, and wrote his famous “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” Two months later, President John F. Kennedy gave his Civil Rights Address, asking, “If an American, because his skin is dark…cannot enjoy the full and free life which all of us want, then who among us would be content to have the color of his skin changed and stand in his place?” And two months after that, 250,000 people came to the nation’s capital for the March on Washington, and heard Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

What does all of that have to do with John Barrett’s "The Civil War in North Carolina"? In answer to that question, I would say that this book is in many ways a book of its time. Barrett emphasizes strategy and tactics, heroism and cowardice, the good and bad decisions made by Union and Confederate leaders; he does not put a great deal of emphasis on slavery as the primary cause of the Civil War (there is not even an entry for slavery in the 14-page index for this 470-page book). Many readers of this time wanted to hear stories of bravery and derring-do; they did not want to hear uncomfortable things about slavery and racism. Barrett gives the readers of that time what they would have wanted.

At the same time, I must say in fairness that Barrett does not at all buy into the “Lost Cause” school wherein the Confederates fight solely for high-minded constitutional considerations, with slavery only an “occasion” rather than a cause, *the* cause, of the war. One of the book’s most powerful details comes in the context of the Union capture of Columbia, North Carolina, when Barrett writes that “To the delight of the Negroes, the whipping post was torn down” (p. 95). In that one detail, Barrett evokes 250 years of inconceivable misery and cruelty.

As Barrett had already written a book about Sherman’s march through the Carolinas, it should be not surprise that many of this book’s best and most thoughtful passages relate to that particular phase of the Civil War in North Carolina. In considering how “Sherman planned to use his military forces against the civilian population as well as the armies of the enemy”, Barrett reflects on the way in which “‘Collective responsibility,’ the theory upon which total war rests, made possible a new mode of warfare in which the accepted rules of the time were transgressed” (pp. 291-92). One senses Barrett’s determination to be fair-minded, and to apply the soldierly pragmatism that one would expect from a VMI military-history professor, in his assessment that “it was not a sense of cruelty and barbarism that prompted Sherman to formulate his theory of total war. This conception was the outgrowth of a search for the quickest, surest, and most efficient means to win a war” (p. 292). Yet it is troubling to reflect that, later in the same decade in which Barrett wrote "The Civil War in North Carolina," U.S. Army officers in Vietnam would be applying Sherman’s doctrine of total war amidst the battlefields of Southeast Asia, destroying villages in order to “save” them.

As mentioned above, John Barrett’s "The Civil War in North Carolina" is relatively “old-school” history; if what was once called “the new social history” is your thing, you will not find it in this book. What you will find is a well-written, well-researched, thorough state-level study of the American Civil War.
Ttexav
Comprehensive coverage of the role of North Carolina's participation and relation to the campaigns in Virginia. Too bad the proofreading was so lax.
great ant
An added dimension to the Civil War The Quaker belt is often overlooked
Anazan
Very thorough, a bit dry to read.
Gelgen
An excellent telling of the Civil War in North Carolina. Full of information that is difficult to find anywhere else. A good research tool and a good read. The complicated picture of North Carolina during the war is told in a detailed, interesting, and validated manner.
Deeroman
It's ok,... but a lot missing from the 'southern viewpoint'
Original
Great job!!
Informative with a lot of detail, but doesn't get bogged down with minutia. Easily readable. Learned a lot about the role of my home state in the Civil War.
The Civil War in North Carolina download epub
Americas
Author: John G. Barrett
ISBN: 0807808741
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; First Edition edition (May 25, 1963)
Pages: 495 pages