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The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn: Gentrification and the Search for Authenticity in Postwar New York download epub

by Suleiman Osman


Epub Book: 1950 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1468 kb.

The most important current book on New York. -New York Post Most of the book focuses on Brooklyn Heights, a neighborhood on a promontory across the East River from Wall Street, which.

The most important current book on New York. The story of Brooklyn's gentrification needed to be written, and Osman does it well. -Times Literary Supplement. Inventing Brownstone Brooklyn gives readers a rich and compelling story of competing urban visions. The power and inner contradictions of the gentrification impulse come alive in these pages. -Daniel T. Rodgers, author of Age of Fracture. Most of the book focuses on Brooklyn Heights, a neighborhood on a promontory across the East River from Wall Street, which probably peaked around the time of the erection of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883.

However, the renovation and revitalization of these areas was often as problematic as urban renewal itself, as local populations, most often non-white and poor, were priced out and further segregated by this wave of gentrification

Inventing Brownstone Brooklyn gives readers a rich and compelling story of competing urban visions. Osman's discussion of the connections between gentrification, urban reform politics, and the 1960s counterculture is especially illuminating

Inventing Brownstone Brooklyn gives readers a rich and compelling story of competing urban visions. Osman's discussion of the connections between gentrification, urban reform politics, and the 1960s counterculture is especially illuminating. -Thomas J. Sugrue, University of Pennsylvania. This fine-grained history portrays gentrifiers as the first Moderns who are both rooted in the growth of big business and the professions and rebelling against the soulless city built by corporations and the state.

The gentrification of Brooklyn has been one of the most striking developments in recent urban history. In The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn, Suleiman Osman offers a groundbreaking history of this unexpected transformation.

We examine one scenario in five cities of New York state's Hudson Valley, a region north of metropolitan New York City that reveals dual trajectories of urban change. In some cities, immigrant revitalization brings population growth, revitalizes main street economies, and. extends cities' majorityminority legacies.

As opposed to many studies of postmodern urban redevelopment, Suleiman Osman finds that gentrification in postwar Brooklyn wasn't the work of a cabal of bankers, real estate speculators, and government bureaucrats after al.

Voices of decline: the postwar fate of .

Suleiman Osman, ebrary, Inc. Date. Voices of decline: the postwar fate of . Setting a reading intention helps you organise your reading. Your reading intentions are private to you and will not be shown to other users. What are reading intentions? Setting up reading intentions help you organise your course reading. It makes it easy to scan through your lists and keep track.

Assistant Professor of American Studies Suleiman Osman challenges the conventional wisdom that New York City's renaissance started in the 1990s, and locates the origins of gentrification in Brooklyn in the cultural upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s

Assistant Professor of American Studies Suleiman Osman challenges the conventional wisdom that New York City's renaissance started in the 1990s, and locates the origins of gentrification in Brooklyn in the cultural upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s. Phillips Hall 801 22nd St. NW Washington, DC 20052. Contact Us Undergraduate Studies Graduate Studies For Faculty & Staff.

And so the brownstoners' quest for authenticity devolved into farce.

An original and captivating history of gentrification, this book challenges the conventional wisdom that New York City began a comeback in the 1990s, locating the roots of Brooklyn's revival in the social upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s.

Considered one of the city's most notorious industrial slums in the 1940s and 1950s, Brownstone Brooklyn by the 1980s had become a post-industrial landscape of hip bars, yoga studios, and beautifully renovated, wildly expensive townhouses. In The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn, Suleiman Osman offers a groundbreaking history of this unexpected transformation. Challenging the conventional wisdom that New York City's renaissance started in the 1990s, Osman locates the origins of gentrification in Brooklyn in the cultural upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s. Gentrification began as a grassroots movement led by young and idealistic white college graduates searching for "authenticity" and life outside the burgeoning suburbs. Where postwar city leaders championed slum clearance and modern architecture, "brownstoners" (as they called themselves) fought for a new romantic urban ideal that celebrated historic buildings, industrial lofts and traditional ethnic neighborhoods as a refuge from an increasingly technocratic society. Osman examines the emergence of a "slow-growth" progressive coalition as brownstoners joined with poorer residents to battle city planners and local machine politicians. But as brownstoners migrated into poorer areas, race and class tensions emerged, and by the 1980s, as newspapers parodied yuppies and anti-gentrification activists marched through increasingly expensive neighborhoods, brownstoners debated whether their search for authenticity had been a success or failure.

Comments: (7)

hulk
Good topic, dense writing, long winding chapters.
Soustil
extremely detailed history about the neighborhood. historical and social description of the evolution of this unique area of Brooklyn. Especially interesting if you live there!
breakingthesystem
Really loved this book, it was a deep and intricate backstory to Brooklyn. For anyone living in the area or one day hopes to own a brownstone its really exciting to hear about the history of the area.
Freighton
Extremely polished academic study of changing demographics, and the concomitant revitalization of Victorian-era (and earlier) residential housing, in and near downtown Brooklyn, post-WW II, also making superficial reference to similar change in other urban centers. A case study of the back-to-the-city movement examining the ethos and economics as well as the politics. Densely written, heavily researched and annotated, published in small print, and not for a general readership.

Most of the book focuses on Brooklyn Heights, a neighborhood on a promontory across the East River from Wall Street, which probably peaked around the time of the erection of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883. The wonderful housing stock, and amenity of an imagined pastoral village in the heart of the great metropolis, attracted urban pioneers after the war, including many notable writers and intellectuals, Arthur Miller, Truman Capote, Norman Mailer, et al. They fought fiercely through the fifties and into the sixties to be not crushed by urban renewal and established the precedent of an historic district.

The writer is descriptive rather than prescriptive. In his deft style, Osman sees everybody on all parts of the spectrum evincing a trope of one sort or another, and possibly as wrong as he or she is right. There are also innumerable palimpsests, for readers who prefer them to tropes, and for others ample gemeinschaft. One can also enjoy a synecdoche, or maybe a panopticon. No? Then you might be a flâneur. Osman found quite a few so join the crowd.

Impressively, the author does not invent victims or advocate on behalf of those self-described. The notorious gangs of South Brooklyn/Red Hook, on the outskirts of downtown Brooklyn, for example, did resemble West Side Story (1957), in that they fought bitterly amongst themselves but didn't snatch the pocketbooks of little old ladies. Or, as Osman might say, did they? No, no, they didn't. They rolled drunks, maybe, occasionally.

That's different than what happened later, with African-Americans and Puerto Ricans packed into nearby vertical ghettos, a component of the great modernist urban plan that survives. Minority advocates whom Osman might view as misguided today demand more of the same such as around Brooklyn's Atlantic Yards project creating a New York venue for the Nets basketball corporation. Ironically, the opposition from those neighboring property owners is abstract; little is being demolished and most of the naysayers may well prosper. The Brooklyn Heights hiposie that wrote the playbook for big project opposition in the fifties and sixties had a better case.

Osman finesses racial conflict associated with gentrification/displacement with mixed results. Quoted with ambiguous approval is a brownstoner who says they "strained their liberalism all out of shape trying to adjust to blacks and their culture of poverty" (p. 237). What "black culture of poverty"? Possibly more white proletarians were displaced by gentrification in Brownstone Brooklyn than blacks and Hispanics. The contradiction was and is class/socio-economic status. This can be seen today as back-to-the-city continues, though on different terms, all over old Brooklyn, in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Prospect Heights, Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Vinegar Hill and Crown Heights, and also in Williamsburg and Red Hook (as well as in Harlem). The 2010 Community Survey says that not only non-Hispanic whites priced out of areas like Park Slope are assuming more distant Victorian housing stock, but middle-class blacks too, and they surely share the same values including a quest for place and authenticity. Indeed, middle-class blacks are perhaps less likely to romanticize the ghetto or what some whites see as diversity.

Paradoxically, the Jacobsian West Village, as well as Brooklyn Heights and Park Slope, comprise some of the most expensive and coveted urban real estate in the country if not the world. The day is fast approaching when nineteenth century housing stock will be exhausted for would-be pioneers. Only at the utmost fringes is the sweat-equity of the 50s through the 70s at all possible. This book therefore essays to chronicle a moment in time.
Westened
Good book.
Gerceytone
Interesting book for those of us who have lived in Brooklyn, New York. However, the writing hovers between academic and for the general public, could have done with a little more editing!
Puchock
Obviously an expanded PhD dissertation. Contains no original research, personal observations or interesting conclusions. A fascinating subject made unspeakably dull by pedestrian writing. Another blooper from The New York Times Book Review. Don't those folks read the books they review?
(holy pussycats....I just wrote my review of THIS book; accidentally, under another book--the one called "Bricks and Brownstone: THe New York Row House...." so...to whoever reads this stuff.....please forgive; and consider that the review which I wrote under "Bricks and Brownstone: THe New York Row House" ......should have been listed under THE INVENTION OF BROWNSTONE BROOKLYN; because this is the book that I was writing about.
The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn: Gentrification and the Search for Authenticity in Postwar New York download epub
Americas
Author: Suleiman Osman
ISBN: 0195387317
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 9, 2011)
Pages: 360 pages