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Fire on the Plateau: Conflict And Endurance In The American Southwest download epub

by Charles F. Wilkinson


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Fire on the Plateau book. Charles Wilkinson has spent almost his entire professional life working as a lawyer and working with Native American rights, water rights, and mineral rights on the Colorado Plateau in the Four Corners region. His book talks about the history, the ecology, the economy, and the people within that area.

This book recounts my journey through the Colorado Plateau, a journey through place and time and self. His work in the early 1970s as staff attorney for the newly formed Native American Rights Fund brought him into close contact with Navajo and Hopi people.

It is this pattern that 'conquered the river of the Southwest' and spawned the region's modern form (Wilkinson, 1999). At the time, most people equated this 'conquest' with progress, based on then-prevailing values in US society. Other economic sectors also became increasingly important, including tourism and recreation, partly attributable to national parks and national recreation areas that were designated in the basin.

The Colorado Plateau of southern Utah, southwestern Colorado, and northern Arizona and New Mexico is the site of some of America's most prized national parks . Traces the history of the Four Corners region.

The Colorado Plateau of southern Utah, southwestern Colorado, and northern Arizona and New Mexico is the site of some of America's most prized national parks, among. ISBN13: 9781559636476.

Bio: Charles Wilkinson is the Moses Lasky Professor of Law Emeritus at the University of Colorado. His fourteen books include the standard law casebooks on Indian Law and Federal Public Land Law. He has also been named as Distinguished Professor, one of just twenty-five on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus.

Fire on the Plateau: Conflict And Endurance In The American Southwest Sep 15, 2004. by Charles F. Wilkinson.

In Fire on the Plateau, legal scholar and writer Charles Wilkinson relates the powerful story of how, over the past .

In Fire on the Plateau, legal scholar and writer Charles Wilkinson relates the powerful story of how, over the past thirty years, he has been drawn ever more deeply into the redrock country and Indian societies of the Colorado Plateau.

Find nearly any book by Charles F Wilkinson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Land and Resource Planning in the National Forests. by Charles F Wilkinson.

Conflict And Endurance In The American Southwest. by Charles Wilkinson. Published April 1, 1999 by Island Press.

"This book recounts my journey through the Colorado Plateau, a journey through place and time and self.... During my explorations of more than three decades, I found a land that sears into my heart and soul, a place that has taught me and changed me. I also discovered a land of conflict and endurance, a land that has given birth to one of the great chapters in American history." --from the Introduction The Colorado Plateau, stretching across four states and covering nearly 80 million acres, is one of the most unique and spectacular landscapes in the world. Remote, rugged, and dry -- at once forlorn and glorious -- it is a separate place, a place with its own distinctive landscape, history, and future.In Fire on the Plateau, legal scholar and writer Charles Wilkinson relates the powerful story of how, over the past thirty years, he has been drawn ever more deeply into the redrock country and Indian societies of the Colorado Plateau. His work in the early 1970s as staff attorney for the newly formed Native American Rights Fund brought him into close contact with Navajo and Hopi people. His growing friendships with American Indians and increasing understanding of their cultures, along with his longstanding scholarship and experiences on federal public lands, led him to delve into the complicated history of the region.Wilkinson examines that history -- the sometimes violent conflicts between indigenous populations and more recent settlers, the political machinations by industry and the legal establishment, the contentious disputes over resources and land use -- and provides a compelling look at the epic events that have shaped the region. From centuries of habitation by native peoples to Mormon settlement, from the "Big Build-Up" of the post-World War II era to the increased environmental awareness of recent years, he explores the conquests of tribes and lands that have taken place, and the ways in which both have endured.Throughout, Wilkinson uses his own personal experiences as a lawyer working with Indian people and his heartfelt insights about a land that he grew to love to tie together the threads of the story. Fire on the Plateau is a vital and dynamic work that is sure to strike a chord with anyone interested in the past or future of the American Southwest.

Comments: (7)

Dianalmeena
Its definitely not everyday that I find a lawyer to admire, so Charles Wilkinson is that rare exception. A bit reluctant at first to pick up a first hand account of recent resource and tribal issues on the Colorado Plateau as seen through the eyes of a lawyer, my attitude changed within a few pages. Charles Wilkinson writes with heart! It doesn't take long to see this writer has an obvious emotional investment in the clients and cases he goes to bat for.
The book opens with a telling case of Navajo high schoolers commuting long hours to attend classes. Wilkinson and his firm made the case that long bus rides were leaving students tried before and after class and hurting their grades. With evidence and conviction, they got high schools built on the reservations. With each case recounted, I could sense Wilkinson's attachment to the Colorado plateau and its people grow and grow.
Fire on the Plateau also provides a much broader telling of both the social and natural history of the Four Corners area. But what really set this book apart from others in my mind is Wilkinson's emergence from a lawyer who is just doing his job to someone who bonded to the land and the people he served.
Jieylau
While a little dated it is still a wonderful source of knowledge about the issues and events that have made the Plateau what it is today...Wilkinson a fine writer and his personal story woven through the book is very interesting....
Awaiting something new from him..j
Tholmeena
charles wilkinson writes clearly and with heart, describing the colorado plateau and his experiences with it. as an attorney who has worked with its native american tribes, his understanding of the area is rich and appreciative. he explains the development of the area and how we've come to be where we currently find ourselves. terrific read, packed with information, history, culture, and his obvious love of the land.
Rindyt
Not only a great travelog but a tremendous lesson on social justice and the injustice of unbridled development. Thank you for the years of research and dedication.
NI_Rak
A well-told history of this area. More interesting that I could have imagined.
Nilarius
I grew up on the Colorado Plateau, just minutes from the "Big Rez," and Charles Wilkinson paints a detailed social, natural and geologic picture of this land, about as close as you can get to the Third World here in the United States, in some ways.

Having one of the largest American Indian populations in the country, and certainly so going by percentage of the population, Indian relations with whites, whether private citizens or the state and federal governments, form a large part of this area's history. Wilkinson, with extensive experience in Indian law, gives an expert's eye view to how this has played out on the Plateau, especially since the rise of the Indian rights movement in the 1970s.

No less a person that Southwestern Indian-oriented novelist Tony Hillerman praises this work for that very expertise. And Hillerman, who has included Navajos, Apaches, Hopis and Zunis as protagonists in various of his novels, would know biased opinion if he saw it. (Contrary to one reviewer here, John Boyden's apparent conflict of interest in representing the Hopi HAS drawn calls for investigation.)

Wilkinson's exposure of how politically connected Salt Lake City attorney John Boyden sold the soul -- and massive coal mining rights -- of the Hopis out to Peabody Coal while also on retainer to Peabody takes up a good-sized chunk of this book. As Wilkinson was the person who discovered the smoking gun, and that in turn was partial motivation for this book, you can feel his anger in defense of Indian rights come through.

For an outside thumbnail history of this, read this Phoenix New Times story at: [...]

The next two factors in this area are the hardness of its natural features and its aridity, as pointed out by explorers like John Wesley Powell. And, per Powell, communal-minded Mormons appear to continue to have the best success of Anglos in dealing with this land.

Then, this area has been America's energy frontier ever since the Manhattan Project at nearby Los Alamos. Much of the country's uranium in the early years of the Atomic Age came from this area. Radiation poisoning, Indian treaty negotiations and environmental hazards are part of that mix.

Oil and natural gas, touched on by Wilkinson, are part of that picture, too, as are logging rights.

Getting back to the American Indian theme, Wilkinson shows how development of these resources has caused fractures in governments of most Southwestern Indian tribes, fractures exacerbated by the fact that their current government structures were imposed by Washington without regard for traditional native systems.

Meanwhile, the start brilliance of red rocks, painted desert, deep canyons and twisting slot canyons serves as the unchanging existential background for this thin-veneered modern story.

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NB: Yes, it's commenting about another reviewer, but I highly suspect "Tom Scadden" has an axe to grind, political or otherwise, with his one-star review. Google had only eight links any Tom Scadden; half of them were to his review of this book. And, though he wrote that review three years ago, it's the only book he's reviewed on Amazon. So, take his rating with a huge grain of salt.

And, I have a hunch that I know who this really is. I think it may be Stephen Boyden, younger son of John Boyden, and himself an attorney -- indeed, he is on record as claiming his father did NOT work for Peabody at the same time he worked for the Hopis. If this is actually Stephen Boyden, well, he learned his conflicts of interest out of the cradle, I guess.
SiIеnt
Anyone with interest in the Four Corners/Colorado Plateau, Native America, Public Land issues, wilderness, law or Western Americana must read this book. Wilkinson's credentials and legacy of work for justice are impeccable. His "Land and Resource Planning in the National Forest" is the best on the subject.
Critics on this site claim that it never happened; that is, Mormon attorney John Boyden never created a conflict of interest by represented Peabody Coal Company and Native America concurrently. (Read: "a Mormon simply wouldn't do it"). Mormons might think themselves irreproachable but greed and the need for glory know no boundaries. The veracity of Boyden's conflict of interest is archived at the University of Utah Marriott Library Special Collections. Anyone can read Boyden's own documents and come to their own conclusion. I have.
Conflict with Peabody or not, the critics have not disputed and cannot dispute the fact that Boyden represented both Hopi and Navajo horrendously over decades, advising them to accept legislation, water and mineral contracts that favored Anglo government and industry -- not the Indian or his land. (I use both "Native American" and "Indian" because some of my Native acquaintances prefer "Indian.") The contracts were so obviously bad and so far below market rate, they were successfully renegotiated many years later.
Wilkinson does a great job of explaining the cultural roots of both Mormons and Native Americans on the plateau that led to such travesties. The ultimate tragedy is that the Hopi and Navajo will never get back any of the plateau land that defines -- or rather defined them culturally.
Fire on the Plateau: Conflict And Endurance In The American Southwest download epub
Americas
Author: Charles F. Wilkinson
ISBN: 1559636475
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Island Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 1999)
Pages: 402 pages