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One of Ours: Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City Bombing download epub

by Richard A. Serrano


Epub Book: 1893 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1283 kb.

Richard Serrano, a Los Angeles Times reporter, arrived in Oklahoma City with the fire engines still racing to. .It gives the basic story and explains relevant details appropriately. This is the first book you should read about the OKC bombing.

Richard Serrano, a Los Angeles Times reporter, arrived in Oklahoma City with the fire engines still racing to the blast site, and he never left the story. On the basis of hundreds of interviews, including an in-depth exclusive with McVeigh himself, Serrano takes us along as the bomb components are collected and a seemingly normal young man hardens his resolve to save the country he loves at the expense of the government he hates.

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I'm 17 and i've read up on the Oklahoma city bombing ever since it happened April 19, 1995. So far this is one of the greatest books i've ever read on the bombing, and beleive me i've read alot of them.

Complete summary of Richard A. Serrano's One of Ours This event marked a substantial turning point in Timothy McVeigh’s life. McVeigh grew up in rural New York, a good student, dutiful son, dependable neighbor. Serrano's One of Ours. eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of One of Ours. This event marked a substantial turning point in Timothy McVeigh’s life. He seemingly overcame the disillusionment of his mother’s abandoning her family when he was twelve. In the same year, he received his first gun and was awestruck by its power. This awe in time became obsessive. McVeigh’s second great disillusionment came when he attempted to join the Green Berets.

Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City bombing. Abandoned by his mother as a child, betrayed by the army, enraged at the government's tactics at Waco, Timothy McVeigh undertook to avenge what the far right sees as the undoing of America

Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City bombing. by Richard A. Serrano. Published 1998 by Norton in New York. Abandoned by his mother as a child, betrayed by the army, enraged at the government's tactics at Waco, Timothy McVeigh undertook to avenge what the far right sees as the undoing of America. While the militias and fanatics ranted, McVeigh alone decided to act. He believed he was starting a revolution, but what he did was galvanize a nation against the very hatred he espoused.

Los Angeles Times reporter Richard Serrano, who covered the story of the Oklahoma City bombing from the day .

Based on hundreds of interviews, including an in-depth exclusive with McVeigh, Serrano takes readers on a wild ride crisscrossing America, as the bomb components are collected and a seemingly normal young man hardens his resolve to save the country he loves at the expense of the government he hates.

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Timothy J. McVeigh, an anti-government activitist, was tried, convicted of the bombing and executed on June 11, 2001. With this book, the mystery is solved

Timothy J. But to Americans everywhere, the story has remained a mystery, held hostage by McVeigh's refusal to explain or even discuss the even and his involvement. But prior to his death, he spoke to Lou Michel and Dan Herbeck, two reporters for The Buffalo News in Western New York, where McVeigh was raised. With this book, the mystery is solved. American Terrorist will change, unmistakeably and permanently our understanding of the crime

The Oklahoma City bombing was a domestic terrorist truck bombing on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States on April 19, 1995

The Oklahoma City bombing was a domestic terrorist truck bombing on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States on April 19, 1995. Perpetrated by Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, the bombing happened at 9:02 am and killed at least 168 people, injured more than 680 others, and destroyed one-third of the building.

A journalist, Richard A. Serrano, has just published One of Ours: Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City Bombing. Like everyone else, I fear, I was sick of the subject. Nothing could justify the murder of those 168 men, women, and children, none of whom had, as far as we know, anything at all to do with the federal slaughter at Waco, the ostensible reason for McVeigh’s fury. So why write such a book? Serrano hardly finds McVeigh sympathetic, but he does manage to make him credible in an ominously fascinating book.

Abandoned by his mother as a child, betrayed by the army, enraged at the government's tactics at Waco, Timothy McVeigh undertook to avenge what the far right sees as the undoing of America. While the militias and fanatics ranted, McVeigh alone decided to act. He believed he was starting a revolution, but what he did was galvanize a nation against the very hatred he espoused. On April 19, 1995, terrorism struck the heartland of America: A cataclysmic explosion destroyed the Oklahoma City federal building, took the lives of 168 people, and injured more than 500 others. It was not the work of a secret foreign cabal or a maniacal suicide bomber. Instead, death drove a rented truck, and behind the wheel was a young white American male with the barest of knowledge at his fingertips--a driver's license to rent a van and a recipe for mixing farm fertilizer and fuel oil to make a bomb. Timothy McVeigh--son of the working class, an army hero, the kid next door--was about to become the worst mass-murderer in American history. Richard Serrano, a Los Angeles Times reporter, arrived in Oklahoma City with the fire engines still racing to the blast site, and he has never left the story. On the basis of hundreds of interviews, including an in-depth exclusive with McVeigh himself, Serrano takes us along on that wild ride crisscrossing America, as the bomb components are collected and a seemingly normal young man hardens his resolve to save the country he loves at the expense of the government he hates.

Comments: (7)

Funky
This book gives an accurate and engaging account of the official story. Finally. It's surprisingly hard to find books like this.
lubov
Excellent book on this tragic event in our history!
Conjuril
As the executive director of the Oklahoma Bombing Investigation Committee, I carefully examined Mr. Serrano's book with great interest. The disappointment I felt after reading his work was disheartening. The book is written under the guise of a non-fiction biography, yet it contains no appendix or back-up documentation. He also fails to credit other writers whose work he "picked up along the way." Serrano's enormous leaps between fact and fantasy are beyond belief. As someone intimately involved in this case, I can tell you this book does not begin to scratch the surface or give the reader a clear picture of what really happened in OK City. One would gain a better perspective of the situation by reading the court trial transcripts rather than Mr. Serrano's personal slant on a man he does not know, about a case he obviously does not fully comprehend. Except for the passages relating to the victims' experiences, I cannot recommend this as a serious research book! . Sincerely, Cate McCauley
Nuadabandis
I took this book out of the public library for something to read about the Oklahoma City bombing while waiting for more of an expose. Serrano offers background information on McVeigh which helped to flesh out the man who most likely was involved in the bombing. What he offered as events of the bombing I found hard to believe considering that a Ret.Brig.Gen. Benton K. Partin submitted a report to Congress outlining his analysis of the blast after many years studying explosives and their effects on targets. Partin contends that in order for the damage to have occured to the Murrah building there would have to have been charges placed on the supporting girders in the basement. Serrano also omits his documentation,any footnotes,a bibliography or any other way of checking his sources. I felt like I was reading exactly what the government wanted me to believe.
Pringles
For once, I am speechless. This book and the story behind it is more powerful than any answers that I can suggest. I will say that both the Prosecution and the Defense in the trial had some correct points. Even the Right to Bear Arms is not a one-sided negative right. One of the best people that I have ever met was a U.S. Anti-Terrorist agent who belonged to the NRA and always carried several weapons but would not harm a fly out of anger or personal vendetta. I think that the readers should read Robert Goldston's The Life and Death of Nazi Germany (now out of print, unfortunately). It maybe isn't so much your environment, your religion, or your general upbringing and even your military record that may count as much as the people or things you blame for the frustrations in life. Hitler was also a real military hero, although his upbringing was nowhere nearly as good as McVeigh's. But Hitler believed in blaming people in general and anger and eventually this led him into blaming absolutely the wrong people. But the Germans of his era had a society built on blame and anger, and this led them into blaming absolutely the wrong people. I believed that Germany should have been re-educated after the war, and I think that the U.S.A. has a lot of that blame and anger whose other sides are over-praise and over-love if you get the meaning. Maybe we should all be part of the final verdict on McVeigh, and before the Final Judge we probably will be.
shustrik
Richard Serrano's account of the events leading up to the Oklahoma City bombing provides an overview of Timothy McVeigh's journey from rural upstate New York through his stint in the Army during the Gulf War to his brutal acts at the Murrah Office Building in Oklahoma.
What is frustrating about this book is Serrano's mixing of fabricated internal diaglogues and thoughts into the text of a non-fiction account. Serrano's visceral hatred of all guns and the people who own and shoot them also permeates the entire book.
Serrano on McVeigh as a young boy learning to shoot with his grandfather: "The rifle stock, pressed against his (McVeigh's) shoulder, the barrel squared, the squint of his eye, the glimmer of the target, and then, more than anything, more than bullet or boy, the sound of its (the gun's) voice. Here was true freedom."
Unless Serrano owns a time machine AND is psychic I'm not sure what a passage like that is doing in a book that claims to be non-fiction. Serrano's shallow pop psychology and his attempts at mind reading, combined with the appalling lack of footnotes, mar a book that had the potential to be the definitive account of a terrible tragedy.
Roru
This book is the most inaccurate of Oklahoma Bombing accounts. Serrano uses it to trash other writers who did a better job. This work is worthless.
I learned more about the OK City bombing incident reading the newspaper--which is obviously the primary source of Mr. Serrano's regurgitated information. This book is dreck, as far as I am concerned. Don't waste your money.
One of Ours: Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City Bombing download epub
Americas
Author: Richard A. Serrano
ISBN: 0393027430
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc; Ex-library edition (April 1, 1998)
Pages: 321 pages