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Through the Storm, Through the Night: A History of African American Christianity (The African American History Series) download epub

by Jacqueline M. Moore,Nina Mjagkij,Paul Harvey


Epub Book: 1648 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1166 kb.

Books abound on the African American religious experience in the US, but Harvey's work is a welcome addition and succinct summary of its 400-year history. Typically in such short monographs, detail is sacrificed for brevity, but Harvey (history, Univ.

Books abound on the African American religious experience in the US, but Harvey's work is a welcome addition and succinct summary of its 400-year history. of Colorado, Colorado Springs) packs great substance through insightful biographies and aptly summarized historical events. He argues against any uniform African American church or religious experience, as African Americans experienced varied contacts with Christianity and often mixed traditional African spiritualism and animistic beliefs.

Paul Harvey successfully uses the history of African American religion to. .current time, and shows how today's African-American Christianity contains elements of various African religions.

Paul Harvey successfully uses the history of African American religion to portray the complexity and humanity of the African American experience. An excellent book that traces African-American Christianity from the early days of slavery to the current time, and shows how today's African-American Christianity contains elements of various African religions.

Thesis (D. Mi. -Drew University, 1993. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 132-134). Thesis (Ph. -Vanderbilt University, 1972. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 182-199).

Following his key publications on African-American religious culture in the South, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs historian Paul Harvey has written a general history of African-American Christianity spanning from the African past to the rise of megachurches in contemporary times. According to Harvey in the introduction, this volume is a short, lively, introductory narrative of African American Christianity (p. 3) also meant for students and scholars to explore more certain areas of African-American Christianity.

A History of African American Christianity. by Paul Harvey,Jacqueline M. Moore,Nina Mjagkij. The African American Experience Series. by Paul Harvey, Jacqueline M. Moore, Nina Mjagkij. series The African American Experience Series. Paul Harvey successfully uses the history of African American religion to portray the complexity and humanity of the African American experience.

Through the Storm, Through the Night provides a lively overview to the history of African American religion, beginning with the birth of African Christianity amidst the Transatlantic slave trade, and tracing the story through its growth in America. Noted author and historian Paul Harvey illustrates how black Christian traditions provided theological, institutional, and personal strategies for cultural survival during bondage and into an era of partial freedom.

Through the Night : A History of African American Christianity. Made in the Margins : Latina/O Constructions of US Religious History. by: Martínez-Vázquez, Hjamil A. Published: (2013).

Through the Storm, Through the Night : A History of African American Christianity. Paul Harvey illustrates how black Christian traditions provided theological, institutional, and personal strategies for cultural survival during bondage and into an era of partial freedom. Black Mega-church : Theology, Gender, and the Politics of Public Engagement. by: Tucker-Worgs, Tamelyn N. Published: (2011).

Through the Storm, Through the Night: A History of African American Christianity ROWMAN 8r LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS INC P lH v i - ' ‘ ' 1 ' an at ey - Lanham 0 Boulder 0 New York 0 Toronto ' Plymouth, UK UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY or NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL.

Through the Storm, Through the Night: A History of African American Christianity ROWMAN 8r LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS INC P lH v i - ' ‘ ' 1 ' an at ey - Lanham 0 Boulder 0 New York 0 Toronto ' Plymouth, UK UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY or NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL CHAPTER THREE Race, Liberty, and Citizenship in the New Nation, 1790-1820 In 1790, the United States conducted. An army of enumerators trudged Or rode on horseback across sixteen states and territories, collected their data, and tabulated the results

Paul Harvey illustrates how black Christian traditions provided theological . Paul Harvey successfully uses the history of African American religion to portray the complexity and humanity of the African American.

Paul Harvey illustrates how black Christian traditions provided theological, institutional, and personal strategies for cultural survival during bondage and into an era of partial freedom. The book also covers internal cultural, gendered, and class divisions in churches that attracted congregants of widely disparate educational levels, incomes, and worship styles. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Paul Harvey illustrates how black Christian traditions provided theological, institutional, and personal strategies for cultural survival during bondage and into an era of partial freedom. At the same time, he covers the ongoing tug-of-war between themes of "respectability" versus practices derived from an African heritage; the adoption of Christianity by the majority; and the critique of the adoption of the "white man's religion" from the eighteenth century to the present. The book also covers internal cultural, gendered, and class divisions in churches that attracted congregants of widely disparate educational levels, incomes, and worship styles.Through the Storm, Through the Night provides a lively overview of the history of African American religion, beginning with the birth of African Christianity amidst the Transatlantic slave trade, and tracing the story through its growth in America. Paul Harvey successfully uses the history of African American religion to portray the complexity and humanity of the African American experience.

Comments: (7)

Lonesome Orange Kid
This brief volume contains six chapters, with a separate introduction and conclusion. The introduction outlines the major themes in African American Religious History, laying the groundwork for the remainder of the volume. Chapter One offers a sweeping overview of African and African American religious experience from the Middle Passage to the Great Awakening; this experience consisted largely of syncretism with a strong dose of opposition of Christianization of slaves by white owners due to concerns it would cause them to desire freedom.

The second chapter documents the early stages of Christianity among slaves, which originated in the urban centers of the North and in the slave quarters. The revival of religious interest among residents of the colonies led to the evangelization of slaves and freemen, and the founding of the earliest traditionally black denominations. Chapter Three surveys the thirty or so years before the Civil War. This period included a high degree of revivalistic evangelism of slaves in the South, and the evolution of a distinct theology among slaves which emphasized liberation with an eye toward dual fulfillment in the present and the future.

In the fourth chapter, Harvey traces the history of African American Christianity from the end of the Civil War to the dawn of the Twentieth Century. It was during this time that blacks began to identify as African Americans as they sought to find their identity amidst their new freedom. This was also a time when whites in the South began to form laws to restrict the freedom of blacks. African Americans also founded a number of new denominations as they sought to live and worship freely. Chapter Five summarizes the first half of the Twentieth Century. This is a period of time when African Americans began to increasingly migrate northward to urban centers and the church became a powerful social center for those displaced communities.

Chapter Six details some of the Civil Rights Movement, shifts toward religious pluralism in some areas, and the continued pursuit of justice in the African American churches. The body of the text concludes with a very brief outline that recaps the volume and makes clear the connection between the prophetic preaching of someone like Jeremiah Wright and the long, dark history of the African American Church. After the epilogue, Harvey provides a number of brief primary source documents that support and illustrate his earlier arguments.

ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSION

Through the Storm, Through the Night is far from an exhaustive treatment of the topic, but it provides an excellent entry point into an interesting and important part of Church History. For those seeking to gain a deeper appreciation for Black History, particularly the history of African American Christianity, this would be an excellent starting point.

Harvey does what is vital for an introductory volume: he tells a good story and makes the reader want to know more. More significantly, he opens up the conversation on a topic that is only becoming increasingly important. The history of the African American portion of the universal church may well, in future, be a model for public engagement, theological fidelity, and social endurance for others.

NOTE: This is an abbreviated version of a post at Ethics and Culture.
Renthadral
I enjoyed reading this book. I learned a tremendous amount about the manner in which slaves were treated. I have great compassion for the work of those who assisted in bring civil rights to this country.
Xig
I did not know any history the black community regarding their churches.
Siratius
This book is excellent. It traces the origins of African American religions. The reader will have a better understanding of the different ways African Americans worship.
Mr.mclav
Very clean pages almost like new good choice.I can make it my own with my own notes.
Marg
I learned a great deal of new information about African American Christianity. This is a very helpful book for both scholars and others who are interested in the History of Christianity in America.
Urtte
Very good purchase!!!!! Book was brand new
This is a terrific brief book that covers an amazing amount of ground. The central theme is the paradox: Christianity was introduced to slaves as a means of keeping them submissive: it had the exact opposite effect. Christianity gave them a story within which to place their story: a story of Exodus, of God's justice and hope, of struggling with the powerful in order to bring about God's will.

Music gets the attention it should in this book. Music helped place the black slaves within a framework of being loved by God, and called to resist oppression; and of validating their sufferings; and of hope.

Well written, brief but filled with events and people who are fascinating, this is a wonderful book. I know of nothing else like it.
Through the Storm, Through the Night: A History of African American Christianity (The African American History Series) download epub
Americas
Author: Jacqueline M. Moore,Nina Mjagkij,Paul Harvey
ISBN: 0742564738
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (July 21, 2011)
Pages: 232 pages