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Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi (Blacks in the New World) download epub

by John Dittmer


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Details the Black struggle for civil rights in Mississippi. Superbly realized history of the civil rights struggle in Mississippi in the 1960s.

Details the Black struggle for civil rights in Mississippi. Dittmer knows a number of the principals and has lived for many years in Mississippi; he is also a sure stylist.

Traces the monumental battle waged by civil rights organizations and by local people to establish basic human rights for all citizens of. .Сравнить похожие товары.

Traces the monumental battle waged by civil rights organizations and by local people to establish basic human rights for all citizens of Mississippi. Blacks in the New World: Local People : The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi by John Dittmer (1995, Paperback).

Reorients the Civil Rights movement to a ground up study.

Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Focusing on both the local Blacks of Mississippi and the activists from outside the state in SNCC and CORE, he adds complexity to the picture of the Civil Rights Movement in documenting the interplay between "outside agitators" and native protest. Outsiders from SNCC and CORE could never have survived without the support of local people. Reorients the Civil Rights movement to a ground up study. Presages many of the themes in civil rights scholarship that would dominate in the next decade.

John Dittmer traces the monumental battle waged by civil rights organizations and by local people . For decades the most racially repressive state in the nation fought bitterly and violently to maintain white supremacy.

John Dittmer traces the monumental battle waged by civil rights organizations and by local people, particularly courageous members of the black communities who were willing to put their lives on the line to establish basic human rights for all citizens of the state. Local People tells the whole grim story in depth for the first time, from the unsuccessful attempts of black World War II veterans to register to vote to the seating of a civil rights-oriented Mississippi delegation at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. Dittmer's stirring history of the struggle for racial justice in Mississippi tells the story in all its grim, often shocking detail. The definitive analytical history of the black freedom movement in the nation's most recalcitrant state. John Dittmer, a professor of history at DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, is the author of Black Georgia in the Progressive Era, 1900-1920.

Dittmer, John (1994). Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. University of Illinois. Carmichael, Stokely, and Charles V. Hamilton. Black Power: The Politics of Liberation, (New York: Random House, 1967), p. 90. ^ Branch, Taylor (1998). Simon & Schuster. Carmichael and Hamilton . 2.

In 1994, the historian John Dittmer wrote Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi, which helped reshape the way scholars thought about the civil rights movement. Most of the well-known histories at that point focused on the big names - the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King J. the NAACP, Rosa Parks. It argued they were the ones who really forced a transformation.

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probably the best book on the civil rights movement I have ever read in my life On page 423, the author notes the following: "Blacks had struggled for their freedom in Mississippi since the earliest.

probably the best book on the civil rights movement I have ever read in my life. On page 423, the author notes the following: "Blacks had struggled for their freedom in Mississippi since the earliest days of slavery an continue to fight for their rights as citizens down to the present.

Select Format: Hardcover. Traces the monumental battle waged by civil rights organizations and by local people to establish basic human rights for all citizens of Mississippi. ISBN13:9780252065071. Release Date:May 1995.

Details the Black struggle for civil rights in Mississippi

Comments: (7)

Varshav
This is a well-written, fascinating and scholarly account of the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi. I had no idea of the scale of the movement's organizing in the state. The author, John Dittmer, maintains that there was more sustained movement organizing in Mississippi than any other southern state. It was also in Mississippi, Dittmer maintains, that the opposition was most fierce. The book documents in detail the internal debates within the different movement organizations, such as the NAACP, SNCC and CORE regarding strategy and tactics. The development of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, and how it fit into the movement, is thoroughly documented. In summary, I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the US.
Doath
It really is the little people that make things happen at the local and state level and those movements sometimes have remarkable and profound effect on the course of history. Clearly in regards to the fight for civil rights by Black Americans in Mississippi in the 50s and 60s, that seemed to be the case. Dittmer does not sugar coat it all either, he lays out very clearly in his concluding chapter that there is still work to be done, for true equality in the American politic and social system to be achieved.
Wen
I am always impressed with the ability to write so well. Easy to follow and very thorough in covering the struggle to be equal by "Local People" - not the famous ones. Just a little redundant.
Chillhunter
Product was satisfactory in every way
Malann
Great Product!! Great Service!!
Bragis
My Uncle is mentioned in this book so it is incredibly special to have it. Thank you!
Ffel
In “Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi”, John Dittmer traces the history of Civil Rights in Mississippi from late World War II through the late 1960s. He writes, “The World War II veterans and traditional black leaders were facing a seemingly impossible task in Mississippi, for despite the wartime upheavals, whites were determined to maintain their supremacy by denying blacks political, educational, and economic opportunity and by maintaining racial segregation in all walks of life” (pg. 19). Discussing class, he writes, “Using the race issue to keep the white lower classes in their place, the men who ran Mississippi unabashedly proclaimed an economic conservatism that would preserve and widen the gap between rich and poor” (pg. 22-23).
Dittmer writes, “In the wake of Brown white Mississippians had developed a siege mentality so pervasive it encompassed virtually every citizen and institution…As the Red Scare of the fifties was abating in the rest of the country, a homegrown McCarthyism took hold in the Magnolia State. Books were banned, speakers censored, and network television programs cut off in midsentence. To be certain that subversives did not operate underground, the legislature created the State Sovereignty Commission, a secret police force that owed its primary allegiance to the Citizens’ Council” (pg. 58). He continues, “What it all comes down to is that in the mid-1950s white supremacists in Mississippi had a specific program: to maintain the status quo in race relations, whatever the cost. Moderates, on the other hand, could offer only cautionary admonitions – to blacks, to go slow, and to northern whites, to stop meddling. The result was a bankruptcy of both moral and political leadership at the most critical point in Mississippi’s history since Reconstruction” (pg. 69).
Dittmer writes, “Much of the middle class was under severe economic constraints and could not be counted on to support the assault against segregated institutions. SNCC workers learned that although officials of the Justice Department listened to their grievances, the activists could not rely on the Kennedy administration to enforce the First and Fifteenth amendments in Mississippi” (pg. 115). He continues, “Until his death John Kennedy tried to maintain good relations with Mississippi’s segregationist congressional delegation. The president went out of his way to avoid conflict, observing the amenities of senatorial courtesy in federal appointments even though it meant undercutting the handful of loyal white Democrats in the state” (pg. 197). On the other hand, “In its final days the Kennedy administration did more visibly identify with the black struggle in the South. After initially opposing the March on Washington, fearing it would alienate support for the administration’s civil rights bill, John Kennedy eventually embraced it, enhancing the movement’s status in the eyes of many skeptical northern whites” (pg. 198).
Dittmer continues, “In Jackson, the unbending resistance of local whites had for a time united blacks across lines of class and age, but as the level of violence intensified, the more conservative black ministers and businessmen became willing to settle on terms that stopped far short of the movement’s original goals” (pg. 168). He writes, “The year 1963 witnessed an explosion of civil rights activity and brutal white repression across the South. Direct action protests rocked Birmingham, Greensboro, Atlanta, Danville, and more than 100 other cities in eleven southern states, with over 200,000 people arrested. In Mississippi the Winona beatings, followed by Evers’s murder, were the opening salvos in a summer campaign of white lawlessness unmatched since 1955” (pg. 173).
Dittmer concludes, “The ambiguity of the phrase ‘black power’ and the subsequent lack of a clearly defined program enabled Mississippi activists to interpret the slogan broadly, enlisting it in behalf of boycotts, voter registration drives, and economic self-help endeavors such as the cooperatives. As far back as the fall of 1964 FDP leaders had been open to the ideas of Malcolm X, who had addressed an FDP rally in Harlem and introduced Fannie Lou Hamer at his Harlem mosque…The strident black nationalism of Stokely Carmichael and SNCC, however, with its underlying theme that whites had no role to play in a black movement, did not attract a large following among local people” (pg. 411). Further, “By the end of 1968 it was clear that the movement had won significant victories in Mississippi. More than 250,000 blacks were now registered to vote, 60 percent of those eligible. Although such numbers did not immediately transfer into political power, the level of political discourse was now changing, and over race-baiting was strikingly absent in campaign oratory. The War on Poverty was by then falling apart, but Head Start, reforms in food stamp allocation, and Medicare and Medicaid brought some improvement in the lives of the black poor” (pg. 425).
Much of our common knowledge of U.S. civil rights movement's history comes from books and films portraying the nationally known struggles of the 1950s and 1960s. This book tells a different story - the struggles of the largely African American activists who, working without the benefit of the national spotlight, sought to open up the closed society of Mississippi to equal treatment for its African American citizens. It was a tremendous and extremely dangerous task. Mississippi was the toughest nut to crack among the Southern states. It was the most impoverished state in the union, where subjugation of African Americans was strictly enforced through intimidation, violence, disenfranchisement, job firings and economic ruin. Any sympathetic whites who dared to even question Mississippi justice were financially ruined and all but run out of the state. In this seemingly impossible to change social, political, and economic climate, a movement of local Mississippi African Americans emerged, with the help of activists from other states, who challenged the situation head-on by attempting to empower African Americans through voter registration drives, by attempting to set up cooperatives in order to gain economic power, and through education. The emphasis was not so much on organizing for desegregation of public facilities as it was on changing the power structure of Mississippi, to enfranchise its African American citizens and gain for them political and economic justice. Working from the bottom up, these activists had few allies, were largely ignored by the national media, and faced life threatening dangers on a daily and nightly basis. Many were savagely beaten, shot at, and repeatedly jailed. Several were murdered. They persisted, working diligently and out of the spotlight. Local People details the successes and failures of these every day struggles, and by doing so, lifts this aspect of the movement from obscurity to its rightful place in history. Prof. Dittmer is a first-rate writer - this book is very hard to put down once you start reading it. What emerges is a portrait of some of the most courageous people in our nation's history, such as Fannie Lou Hamer, Amzie Moore, and Bob Moses, and the local people who responded to the activists efforts. Local People is essential reading for any true understanding of the civil rights movement.
Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi (Blacks in the New World) download epub
Americas
Author: John Dittmer
ISBN: 0252065077
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University of Illinois Press; First Edition edition (May 1, 1995)
Pages: 560 pages