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The Slave Ship: A Human History download epub

by Marcus Rediker


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Rediker's book is a must read for those who desire a deeper understanding of the slaving industry.

Ira Berlin, author of Many Thousands Gone. Rediker's book is a must read for those who desire a deeper understanding of the slaving industry. His is one of very few volumes that depicts the Atlantic as an exceptionally violent place. This violence touched not only the slaves, but also those the crews of these vessels.

Электронная книга "The Slave Ship: A Human History", Marcus Rediker

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It is this rich array of material that Marcus Rediker plumbs, more thoroughly than anyone else to date, for his masterly new book, The Slave Ship: A Human History

It is this rich array of material that Marcus Rediker plumbs, more thoroughly than anyone else to date, for his masterly new book, The Slave Ship: A Human History. His focus is on the period after 1700, when this traffic was increasingly dominated by Britain - a country where, as anyone who has worked in its libraries and archives knows, they seldom seem to throw a piece of paper away.

Marcus Rediker is the Distinguished Professor of Atlantic History at the University of Pittsburgh and the award-winning author . He lives in Pittsburgh. Библиографические данные. The Slave Ship: A Human History.

Marcus Rediker is the Distinguished Professor of Atlantic History at the University of Pittsburgh and the award-winning author of The Slave Ship. 1440620849, 9781440620843.

Marcus Rediker restores the slave ship to its rightful place alongside the plantation as a formative institution of slavery, a place where a profound and still haunting history of race, class, and modern economy was made.

ation of Oyotunji community and racial identity. Five years after the book’s publication, I still highly. recommend it to students of the African diaspora. New York: Viking Press, 2007. CITED Equiano, Olaudah 2001 The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, written by himself. Reversing the Sail: A History of the African Diaspora. London: James Phillips. Gomez, Michael 2005 Reversing the Sail: A History of the African Diaspora.

Hence, subjectivities, social movements, and institu- New York: Viking Press, 2007. Included in this list are Olaudah cans.

Marcus Rediker was born in Owensboro, Kentucky, in 1951. The Cover of the book: The Slave Ship, A Human History. The Atlantic slave trade carried on for four long centuries before it got abolished(1807–1808), although it is still going on in certain parts of the world like Libya and Malawi. He attended Vanderbilt University, dropped out of school and worked in a factory for three years, and graduated with a . from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1976.

The Slave Ship: A Human HistoryPaperback – 30 September 2008. by Marcus Rediker(Author). - Ira Berlin, author of Many Thousands Gone.

The Slave Ship: A Human History (2007). The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom (2012)

Rediker has written several books on Atlantic social, labor, and maritime history. The Slave Ship: A Human History (2007). The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom (2012). The Fearless Benjamin Lay: The Quaker Dwarf Who Became the First Revolutionary Abolitionist (2017).

“Masterly.”—Adam Hochschild, The New York Times Book ReviewIn this widely praised history of an infamous institution, award-winning scholar Marcus Rediker shines a light into the darkest corners of the British and American slave ships of the eighteenth century. Drawing on thirty years of research in maritime archives, court records, diaries, and firsthand accounts, The Slave Ship is riveting and sobering in its revelations, reconstructing in chilling detail a world nearly lost to history: the "floating dungeons" at the forefront of the birth of African American culture.

Comments: (7)

Ganthisc
Academically stunning, and finally an in depth study of the entire merchant system and the ships that made it possible. Multiple viewpoints of the same events, such as the collection of Africans from the coasts of Africa, yields a layered view of how those events unfolded for the different participants. Occasionally repetitive, since quoting the same testimony for different points of view. Since this book is primarily about the ships, and their pivotal mechanism and technology as it was applied to the merchant trade and growth of capitalism not only in the Americas, but also throughout the rest of the Western world, it is appropriate that much of the book's discussion and evidence given, supports the use of the ships in their evil service rather than how the slaves, mates and sailors felt about what was happening around and to them.

My main disappointment (and understandable since the testimony of sailors employed on the ships engaged in the slave trade was more acceptable to Parliment than that of the transported slaves) was that there were precious few quotes from the Africans themselves who experienced the horror of the Middle Passage. Their experiences were reported tangentially through others, such as ship's surgeons, mates and sailors; but rarely in their own words. Regardless of my personal disappointments, the research presented and the the depth of the discussion have left a sobering impression, with little doubt as to the disregard, callousness and abject evil of the merchants, governments, traders and the entire plantation system that led to the inhuman transport of more than 12 million souls, against their will, to service the purposes and greed of an entire merchant system without the slightest interest in those humans welfare, only insofar as it serviced their own interests.
Marg
Rediker's book is a must read for those who desire a deeper understanding of the slaving industry. His is one of very few volumes that depicts the Atlantic as an exceptionally violent place. This violence touched not only the slaves, but also those the crews of these vessels.

This last point should raise a question for the reader: is it appropriate for Rediker to emphasize the plight of slave crews as well as slaves? Does this detract from the uniquely horrible experiences of slaves traded across the Atlantic, or more realistically depict the disgusting nature of the industry as a whole? This is for the reader to decide. Either way, Rediker is careful to craft a narrative that graphically depicts the disgusting violence of the Atlantic slave trade. For this reason the book is a necessary read. This was a bloody industry, and Rediker does well to depict it as such.
Kigabar
I was hoping for a book that would really capture the essence and emotion of life aboard a slave ship. This is more of a detached intellectual discussion to me. As such, it is an interesting read, but not terribly captivating.
Kelezel
Each chapter is about slavers, the boats, the crew and taken from historical accounts or records. I have read a lot about slavery and it is a subject of great interest for a history buff and understanding how the US was made. This book is a little "scholarly" and tedious but is a good addition to others about the subject.
Virtual
For me, the primary value of this book was in contemplating, as the author states in the introduction, "horrors which have always been, and remain, central to the making of global capitalism." How can we fight against them? Participants in the slave trade were prone to think of the Africans as cannibals while thinking of themselves as ethical civilized redeemers and good Christians. How do we deceive ourselves today?

I was reminded that life has taken me to several locations related to the history of the slave trade, among them Charleston and Barbados (not to mention the Cape Verde Islands and St. Peter Paul Rocks). Charleston served as a distribution point for the entire lower South, with more than half of the slaves imported into the US going through there. Barbados, the epicenter of the historic sugar revolution and crown jewel of the British colonial system, was thus the most fully realized- and therefore most brutal- slave societies to be found anywhere in the world. What locations - both physical and virtual, are at the center of evils rising from capitalism today?

There's a lot of repetition in the pages of THE SLAVE SHIP, most likely because it was purposely written to be a book of which any section could be referenced without having read what comes before or after. Hence, if you are reading the whole thing straight through (as I did), and are not a good speed reader (as I am not), you may spend a lot more time digesting this book than you anticipated. Early chapters deal with subjects such as "The Evolution of the Slave Ship", and "African Paths to the Middle Passage" and recount primary source materials from the perspectives of various participants, both willing and unwilling.

Latter chapters share the story of the Slave Ship from more general perspectives of all the different roles: merchants, captains, sailors, and slaves. With regard to the chapter "The Captain's Own Hell", the captain's power depended first and foremost on a connection to capitalists.

With regard to "The Sailors' Vast Machine", sailors were on the whole among the poorest of the poor-- "refuse and dregs" of society. They were a "thoughtless set of men" who cared for today and not tomorrow, more than willing to undertake dangerous journeys for an early paycheck in hand.Yet they looked out for one another, buying goods of departed seamen paying considerably more than any given item was worth to help surviving family members.

Captains were notorious for getting rid of extra crew before completing their voyage--leaving behind a pathetic human landscape of broken-down sailors in West Indies ports. Therefore common sailors would learn to assert a power of their own from below to oppose the concentrated power of the captain. A particularly interesting tale to me in this section recounts the sailors' insurrection in Liverpool, from which we get the word "strike" in our language today: sailors "struck" or took down the sails of vessels.

Moving away from the vantage point of sailors, we then look at life aboard the slave ship from the perspective of the human cargo themselves. "From Captives to Shipmates" describes the dehumanizing stripping of culture from above and an oppositional process of creation of culture coming from below, "the alchemy of chains mutating, under the hard pressure of resistance, into bonds of community. "

Finally, "The Long Voyage of the Slave Ship Brooks" offers insights into activism. The creation of the Brook's image was part of a larger strategy to educate, agitate, and activate people anywhere the slave trade went on. It called on citizens to stand forth and throw light on the subject, that is, the dark lower deck of the Brooks and other slave ships, by putting forth relevant information. The declared goal was to be objective- to present facts about a slave ship that could not be disputed by those involved in it.

In conclusion, read this book all the way through, as I did, or reference particular chapters which have special interest for you. You won't be disappointed either way. It reads much better than some books written by historians. Just be prepared to sit down and slowly reflect on the material.
The Slave Ship: A Human History download epub
Americas
Author: Marcus Rediker
ISBN: 0143114255
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (September 30, 2008)
Pages: 448 pages