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by John Higham


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Strangers in the Land book.

Strangers in the Land book. John Higham’s Strangers in the Land, first published in 1955, traces the resulting backlash of nativism in America during the last decades of the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth, culminating in the passage of the Immigration Restriction Act in 1921 which closed America’s doors to European immigrants for the first time in its history.

Strangers in the Land is, then, a history of public opinion, whose purpose is to. .The book thus focuses on points of conflict, "antagonisms that belong within ideologies of passionate national consciousness.

Strangers in the Land is, then, a history of public opinion, whose purpose is to show how nativism evolved in society and in action. Higham's work stands as the seminal work in the history of American nativism. The work is a careful, well-documented study of nationalism and ethnic prejudice, and chronicles the power and violence of these two ideas in American society from 1860 to 1925.

In June 2005, John Higham quit his job as a rocket scientist, and along with . Strangers in the Land" is a classic study of American Nativism from the Civil War to the 1920s

In June 2005, John Higham quit his job as a rocket scientist, and along with his wife (who also quit her job), packed up their home and for the next 52 weeks visited 29 countries on five continents, and crossed 24 time zones. Strangers in the Land" is a classic study of American Nativism from the Civil War to the 1920s. By no coincidence, the same era was the heyday of Jim Crow, of lynchings and ethnic cleansing directed against African-Americans.

Strangers in the land. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on September 30, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

The book, Strangers in the Land – Patterns of American Nativism, 1860 – 1925 was written by John Higham. The book was published in the year 1954. John Higham was born in New York in 1920 and graduated from the Johns Hopkins University

The book, Strangers in the Land – Patterns of American Nativism, 1860 – 1925 was written by John Higham. John Higham was born in New York in 1920 and graduated from the Johns Hopkins University. He has worked for the University of Wisconsin, Madison and the . army air force in its historical division in Italy. He earned his doctorate under Merle Curti in 1949.

Higham's book also chronicles the half-hearted restrictionism of some on the left - labor leaders' fear that immigrants depressed wages, progressives' fear that low-skilled immigrants over-burdened the welfare system. The central lesson of Higham's book is that whenever America is feeling economically militarily confident and socially unified, nativism disappears. But recessions, geopolitical threats, and domestic political battles cause nativism to erupt. patterns of American nativism, 1860-1925. Published 1955 by Rutgers University Press in New Brunswick, .

John William Higham (October 26, 1920 – July 26, 2003) was an American historian, scholar of American culture, historiography and ethnicity. In the 1950s he was a prominent critic of Consensus history. Historian Dorothy Ross says, "The multi-ethnic environment of his early life in Queens, the wartime optimism, and his immersion in Progressive history, with its fundamental faith in American democracy, gave him a vision of an egalitarian, cosmopolitan, American nationalism in which he never lost faith.

Home Browse Books Book details, Strangers in the Land: Patterns of American. Although I began with simpler intentions, this book has grown well beyond its original design. At first I intended only to trace popular attitudes on immigration restriction. Strangers in the Land: Patterns of American Nativism, 1860-1925. But I discovered that I was dealing with elements that could scarcely be defined-far less understood-within the limits of a functional context as simple as a legislative program. As a result, this book attempts a general history of the anti-foreign spirit that I have defined as nativism.

John Higham first used the term "in-betweenness" in his discussion of new immigrants to the South and Italian immi grants in Louisiana in particular. But the "in-betweenness" of which he spoke referred to the This content downloaded from 7. 14.

Book by Higham, John

Comments: (7)

Ahieones
Scholarly work (although that shouldn't turn off the casual reader). The history of mistrust and blame thrust upon immigrant from many nations and during many periods of our history is very illuminating, and so relevant to today. Very worthwhile.
Vertokini
Every paragraph was something to read and remember.
GoodBuyMyFriends
Solid history, tons of great insights...This book is really worth reading re: nativism, ethnic history, insights into how different groups relate or do not relate.
Mariwyn
on time, on target, as promised
Binar
Unreadable. I bought this as a textbook for a college class, and it was so difficult to read. It's basically page after page of fact after fact. There is no story, no narrative at all. It's also very easy to forget the information after reading it. My whole class read this book, and everyone had the same problem retaining the information that was presented. The day after we finished reading the book, one classmate commented, "Oh, I completely forgot that book existed." We had literally just finished reading it. There has to be a better book out there on this subject.

I am an avid reader, and I have gotten through many a dry textbook. This book took it to a whole new level.
Wymefw
Higham's work stands as the seminal work in the history of American nativism. The work is a careful, well-documented study of nationalism and ethnic prejudice, and chronicles the power and violence of these two ideas in American society from 1860 to 1925. He significantly moves beyond previous treatments of nativism, both in chronology and in interpretive sophistication. Higham defines nativism as a defensive type of nationalism or an intense opposition to an internal minority on the grounds of the group's foreign connections. By defining nativism as a set of attitudes or a state of mind, he sets the course for his book as tracing "trace an emotionally charged impulse" rather than "an actual social process or condition." As he argues that the ideological content of nativism remained consistent, he uses emotional intensity as a measure to trace in detail public opinion from the relative calm following the Civil War to the Johnson-Reed act of 1924 that severely limited European immigration.
Strangers in the Land is, then, a history of public opinion, whose purpose is to show how nativism evolved in society and in action. Higham seeks to explain what could inflame xenophobia and who resisted it. He saw his work as part of a renewed interest in the study of nationalism following the national upheavals in the wake of the McCarthy hearings. Surely Higham's mentor at the University of Wisconsin, intellectual historian Merle Curti, influenced Higham's approach in seeking to examine the power of nationalism as an idea. Also influential was the intellectual climate of the 1950s with its of distrust of ideology and distain of prejudice. Higham admits being repelled by the nationalist delusions of the Cold War, again helping to explain why his study concentrates on seeking some explanation for the irrational and violent outbreaks. The book thus focuses on points of conflict, "antagonisms that belong within ideologies of passionate national consciousness." For example, Higham's explains the 100 percent American movement in terms of progressive ideals and the desire of Americans to shape immigrants into a particular ideal of "Americanness" through education and assimilation. This intellectual construct eventually gave way to the racial thinking to which Higham assigns much influence in the efforts to restrict immigration. Ideology is also central to his chapter on the history of the idea of racism in which he argues that Anglo-Saxon nationalism, literary naturalism and a nascent understanding of genetics combined to bring forth arguments for immigration restriction to preserve the racial purity of the American people. Thus, key for Higham's argument is the power of ideas in shaping individual behavior and thereby shaping history.
This text is an absolute must-read for anyone seeking to understand American nativism and the darker side of nationalism
Longitude Temporary
... none that has been identified at least, but "nativism" does have some of the marks of what Richard Dawkins has called a "meme" - derived from the word 'memory' - a kind of evolutionary package of cultural 'knowledge'. Like genetic packages, cultural patterns are inherited and thus inherent, and like genes, 'memes' can be efficiently re-adapted to other functions than their originals.

"Strangers in the Land" is a classic study of American Nativism from the Civil War to the 1920s. By no coincidence, the same era was the heyday of Jim Crow, of lynchings and ethnic cleansing directed against African-Americans. The hatred directed against Catholics by nativist movements merged eventually into the hatred of "blacks" in the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, the acme of Nativism. But this same era was also the heyday of American anti-Semitism, culminating in the exclusion acts passed by Congress against Eastern European Jews as well as Sicilian Catholics. That anti-Semitism - like it or not, Americans - played an enabling part of Hitler's unchallenged ascent to power and in the Holocaust, when America kept the door closed to Jewish escapees. And let's not forget that nativism and anti-immigrant bigotry lay at the core of the exclusion acts against Chinese and Japanese, who might have sought freedom and opportunity in "Beikoku" - "Beautiful Country", the name used in Japan then for America.

In other words, as author Higham demonstrates, bigotry/nativism is a "pattern" - his use of that word seems to me to approach the idea of a meme - that can serve the cause of hatred and exclusion of any ethnic/racial/religious minority. And it's almost always evident that bigotry expressed toward one minority merely temporarily masks bigotry felt towards all "others." Today's nativist fear and loathing of "wetbacks" and "islamicists" contains all the memetic material needed for tomorrow's recrudescent anti-Semitism and societal persecution of.... ___________. [Put your own ethnicity in the blank.]
Higham's basic story is of the ups and downs of nativism as a whole, and of the various elements comprising it: anti-radicalism, anti-Catholicism, anti-coolieism, and Anglo-Saxonism. Though he does all he can to show nativists in a bad light and foreigners in a good light, the very facts he presents tell a different story. He identifies three main pro-immigrant forces: cosmopolitan ideologues and sentimentalists, business interests greedy for cheap labor, and foreign ethnic lobbies. Most telling is the fact that, by 1925, immigrants themselves were the only remaining opponents of immigration restriction, which only goes to show that they believed their real compatriots to be the ones back in the Old Country, not here in the new.
Strangers in the Land download epub
Americas
Author: John Higham
ISBN: 0313224595
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Greenwood; New edition edition (January 13, 1981)
Pages: 445 pages