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The Cold War at Home: The Red Scare in Pennsylvania, 1945-1960 download epub

by Philip Jenkins


Epub Book: 1267 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1977 kb.

Philip Jenkins is Distinguished Professor of History and Religious Studies at Pennsylvania State University.

Philip Jenkins is Distinguished Professor of History and Religious Studies at Pennsylvania State University. His books include Hoods and Shirts: The Extreme Right in Pennsylvania, 1925-1950 and Moral Panic: Changing Concepts of the Child Molester in Modern America. Philip Jenkins is Distinguished Professor of History and Religious Studies at Pennsylvania State University.

and also how significantly it was shaped by fears of imminent war with and even physical invasion by the Soviet Union

and also how significantly it was shaped by fears of imminent war with and even physical invasion by the Soviet Union. Journal of American History. Readers might be forgiven for wondering if yet another book on such an intensively studied subject could reveal much new. Happily, the answer is a largely unqualified yes.

Cold War at Home book.

Pennsylvania State University professor Philip Jenkins provides a sweeping analysis and discussion of Communism and . Jenkins points out that Communism had been a fringe movement in Pennsylvania in the 1920s.

Pennsylvania State University professor Philip Jenkins provides a sweeping analysis and discussion of Communism and anti-Communism in Pennsylvania during the height of United States and Soviet post-World War II tensions in his book Cold War at Home.

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Philip Jenkins examines the political and social impact of the Cold War across the state, tracing the Red Scare's reverberations in party politics, the labor movement, ethnic organizations, schools and universities.

Philip Jenkins examines the political and social impact of the Cold War across the state, tracing the Red Scare's reverberations in party politics, the labor movement, ethnic organizations, schools and universities, and religious organizations. Among Jenkins's most provocative findings is the revelation that, although their absolute numbers were not large, Communists were very well positioned in crucial Pennsylvania regions and constituencies, particularly in labor unions, the educational system, and major ethnic organizations. ISBN13:9780807847817.

The Cold War at Home: The Red Scare in Pennsylvania, 1945-1960" – электронная кніга аўтараў Philip Jenkins. Чытайце гэту кнігу з дапамогай праграмы Кнігі Google Play на ПК, прыладах з Android, iOS. Спампуйце для чытання па-за сеткай, вылучайце тэкст, рабіце закладкі або рабіце нататкі падчас чытання The Cold War at Home: The Red Scare in Pennsylvania, 1945-1960.

The Cold War at Home by Philip Jenkins takes minor notice of these major cases, but mainly features the Red Scare as it pertains to the state of Pennsylvania

The Cold War at Home by Philip Jenkins takes minor notice of these major cases, but mainly features the Red Scare as it pertains to the state of Pennsylvania. The author is a history and religion professor at Penn State University, the book is tailored not for those looking at the major cases involving the Red Scare, but rather to those four individuals who are interested how the Red Scare developed in the state of Pennsylvania. TERM Spring '11. PROFESSOR Coumbe. TAGS Red Scare, Cold War, BibliographyJenkins

The Cold War at Home: The Red Scare in Pennsylvania 1945–1960. University of North Carolina Press. Decade of Nightmares: The End of the 1960s and the Making of Eighties America.

The Cold War at Home: The Red Scare in Pennsylvania 1945–1960. New York: Oxford University Press. 344 pp. The New Faces of Christianity: Believing the Bible in the Global South.

One of the most significant industrial states in the country, with a powerful radical tradition, Pennsylvania was, by the early 1950s, the scene of some of the fiercest anti-Communist activism in the United States. Philip Jenkins examines the political and social impact of the Cold War across the state, tracing the Red Scare's reverberations in party politics, the labor movement, ethnic organizations, schools and universities, and religious organizations. Among Jenkins's most provocative findings is the revelation that, although their absolute numbers were not large, Communists were very well positioned in crucial Pennsylvania regions and constituencies, particularly in labor unions, the educational system, and major ethnic organizations. Instead of focusing on Pennsylvania's right-wing politicians (the sort represented nationally by Senator Joseph McCarthy), Jenkins emphasizes the anti-Communist activities of liberal politicians, labor leaders, and ethnic community figures who were terrified of Communist encroachments on their respective power bases. He also stresses the deep roots of the state's militant anti-Communism, which can be traced back at least into the 1930s.

Comments: (3)

INwhite
The late 1940s and early 50s was the era of noir culture in film, of Betty Page and Mickey Spillane. The shadow of Hiroshima, the horrors of WW II, the paranoia of both Stalin and his foes, bred a dark, brooding consciousness at odds with the brassy arrogance of the early 40s. This spirit also permeated American political culture. The closest the US ever came to fascism was in this backlash era, when all the Dark Forces seemed to coagulate in domestic subversion and anti-Communism was elevated to official state doctrine. Just as fascism snd Trotskyism were the pretext for political intrigue and reaction in Stalin's USSR, so did the American Red Scare of the post-war decade serve similar totalitarian ends. The real target - at least domestically - was not a relatively minor Communist movement, as compared to Europe. The true purpose and targets of McCarthyism, HUAC, and the McCarran Act were the taming, if not destruction of organized labor, New Deal progressivism, and the nascent civil rights movement; and the protection of property and privilege from these home threats.

Philip Jenkins is quite right when he says the focus on high McCarthyite politics at the national/celebrity level has obscured the home-grown witch hunts that victimized far more people, with little hope of exoneration or apology from their persecutors. Pennsylvania was a keystone state indeed for this domestic purge, as an industrial powerhouse and a political base for the Democratic Party. Pennsylvania also had a history of radical labor and populism that had coalesced into a small, but notable, state Communist movement with outlying sympathizers. Jenkins outlines the truly totalitarian reach of the anti-Communist purge - into churches, ethnic associations, labor, media, and public schools and universities. Although built on pre-war fears of an Axis Fifth Column, this cold war wave was ironically pushed by those who had been isolationists and Nazi sympathizers when the enemy was not a red one.

As in all such campaigns the fear was not mere hysteria: it took premeditated calculation to make such loathing abroad and dread at home seize the public mind. Fear, of course, exacts a toll from those who suffer it. Fear of the fear-mongers at last emerged, weariness of unending cries of wolf at the door, horror at the greater threat of nuclear holocaust if the hysteria continued. In the end the memory of FDR's voice seemed to echo over the cold war landscape: nothing to fear but fear itself. Despite subsequent attempts to revive this movement in the Reagan years, and the new "war on terrorism," American society was badly burned by the post-WW II "crusade for freedom." Let's hope the lesson remains learned.
Tat
Philip Jenkins does a masterful job of documenting and reminding us how much of "McCarthyism" predated McCarthy and carried on after his demise. He does this in a well written text which uncovers the roles of individuals in Pennsylvania who worked with, for and against the Communist left in the labor movement, education, ethnic groups, churches and most importantly state political and judicial systems. This state is taken as a case study in the overall malestorm of Red hunters and the author is able to provide an overview of the national context while zeroing in on specific state events. He accomplishes his goal.
For the most part this history is centered in the 1950's when the loss of China and the Korean War intensified the "Red Scare." The author is careful however, to document background and causes, for example, he goes back to 1927 (when two professors of West Chester State Normal College were dismissed for citicisms of U.S. Policies in Nicaragua) to examine the 1951 Pechan Act which required loyalty oaths for public employees and affirmation that they were not subversive agents. Candidates for elective office were required to file a sworn statement that they could not be considered subversive. This and other laws were upheld by the courts of Pennsylvania which were occupied by anti-Communists.
Jenkins explores the role of Matthew Cvetic exhaustively in context of the national HUAC hearings but also in the context of an ethnic and religious member of society. He was Pennsylvannia's most significant mole who spent time in the 1940s as an FBI agent in the Communist Party and was instrumental in naming many names (some 300 leftist), many in the United Electrical,Radio and Machine workers of America.
I like the balance in this account,because while Jenkins explores the extremism of some of the Red baiting actors, he also carefully documents the actual workings of the Communist Party in ethnic groups, labor groups and teaching unions. He explains why events took such a course.
This is a real contribution to Cold War history. I was impressed at how he carefully threaded in the significance of the Korean War. It is not and does not pretend to be a survey of "McCarthyism" which is better read in Ellen Schrecker's "The Age of McCarthy" and Stephen Whitfield's "The Culture of the Cold War." Jenkins mentions in his introduction that Michael Holmes' "The Specter of Communism in Hawaii" and M.J. Heale's "McCarthy's Americans" present other case studies in this period similar to his own work.
Let me conclude that Jenkins has does his work carefully,coherently and scholarly. I am impressed with the number of endnotes and documentations from numerous newpapers, most notetably from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. He has a geat conclusion which explores the consequences of the anti-Communist movements, its effect on individuals and federalism. This case study approach on a large industrial state with strong ethnic organizations, an active Catholic clergy, New Deal Democrats, various elite Republicans,and fractious labor groups is most informative per se. It will also be most interesting to those in or from the state of Pennsylvania.
Dorintrius
not read yet, it will be usefull for my research
The Cold War at Home: The Red Scare in Pennsylvania, 1945-1960 download epub
Americas
Author: Philip Jenkins
ISBN: 0807824984
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (October 1999)
Pages: 288 pages