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Acadian to Cajun: Transformation of a People, 1803-1877 download epub

by Carl A. Brasseaux


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Home Browse Books Book details, Acadian to Cajun: Transformation of a People,. Acadian to Cajun: Transformation of a People, 1803-1877. By Carl A. Brasseaux. Beginning with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, when the transplanted culture began to take on a decidedly Louisiana character, the investigation extends to 1877, the end of Reconstruction in Louisiana, by which time ascriptive distinctions between Acadians and neighboring groups had become blurred, giving rise to the creation of a new people - the Cajuns. The latter development serves as a major watershed in the society's.

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Carl A. Brasseaux has done an excellent job at attempting to give myself and other readers an introspective look . Brasseaux has done an excellent job at attempting to give myself and other readers an introspective look at the life of the Acadians living in southern Louisiana before, during, and after the Civil War. Unfortunately, very little is known about this colorful and oft misunderstood cultural group during this time. Brasseaux, however, gives a very good sketch of what went on. He takes us to the time of the transfer of Louisiana from France to the United States and how little the Acadians cared about the politics of the time. He illustrates the differences between the prarie Acadians and the river Acadians.

Carl Anthony Brasseaux (born August 19, 1951) is a retired historian of French Colonial North America, and particularly of Louisiana and the Cajun people. He helped to pioneer the field of Cajun history, and his published works on this topic represent the first serious, in-depth examination of the history of the ethnic group. Brasseaux was born in Opelousas, the seat of St. Landry Parish, in south Louisiana. He grew up in the prairie Cajun town of Sunset

This is the second book that I have purchased from Carl Brasseaux. Библиографические данные.

This is the second book that I have purchased from Carl Brasseaux. This book is so imformative and I found myself not being able to put it down. The book came in excellent condition Читать весь отзыв.

This book is the first to examine comprehensively the demographic growth, cultural evolution, and political involvement of Louisiana's large Acadian community. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

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Acadian to Cajun: Transformation of a People, 1803-1877 by Carl A. Brasseaux An enlightening assessment that provides understanding of how the Acadians of Nova Scotia were culturally transformed into the Cajuns of Louisiana. This book is the first to examine comprehensively the demographic growth, cultural evolution, and political involvement of Louisiana's large Acadian community between the time of the Louisiana Purchase (1803), when the transplanted culture began to take on a decidedly Louisiana character, and 1877, the end of Reconstruction in Louisiana, when traditional distinctions.

This book is the first to examine comprehensively the demographic growth, cultural evolution, and political involvement of Louisiana's large Acadian community between the time of the Louisiana Purchase (1803), when the transplanted culture began to take on a decidedly Louisiana character, and 1877, the end of Reconstruction in Louisiana, when traditional distinctions between Acadians and neighboring groups had ceased to. Be valid

Acadian to Cajun: Transformation of a People, 1803-1877 (1992). Creoles of Color in the Bayou Country (1994). The Founding of New Acadia: The Beginnings of Acadian Life in Louisiana, 1765-1803 (1987).

Acadian to Cajun: Transformation of a People, 1803-1877 (1992). French, Cajun, Creole, Houma: A Primer on Francophone Louisiana (2005). Scattered to the Wind": Dispersal and Wanderings of the Acadians, 1755-1809 (1991). Stir the Pot: A History of Cajun Cuisine (2005)

This book is the first to examine comprehensively the demographic growth, cultural evolution, and political involvement of Louisiana's large Acadian community between the time of the Louisiana Purchase (1803), when the transplanted culture began to take on a decidedly Louisiana character, and 1877, the end of Reconstruction in Louisiana, when traditional distinctions between Acadians and neighboring groups had ceased to be valid.

Serving as a model for ethnohistories of other nonliterate peoples, Acadian to Cajun reveals how authentic cultural history can be derived from alternative historical resources when primary materials such as newspapers, correspondence, and diaries are not available. Here, Carl A. Brasseaux assembles a composite picture of this large Cajun community. From civil records, federal census reports, ecclesiastical registers, legislative acts, and electoral returns, he reveals the astonishing cultural transformation of the Acadians of Nova Scotia into the Cajuns of Louisiana.


Comments: (7)

net rider
It's an authentic textbook on the subject with many references. It reads like a college textbook written by someone who is a descendant.
Tejora
I read this prior to a trip to Lafayette for a program that focused on the Cajuns Culture and Cuisine. A lot of historical facts were given to us which paralleled and complemented what the book revealed. Lots of insights in this book on historical facts that have not been taught in our schools!
Saberdragon
Thank you for the A+, even at my age as a Grad student...those A+ 's mean everything!! Fast shipment, book in excellent condition, great material!! Thank you very much!!!
Zahisan
this is a 5 star seller. packaging and handling excellent. have begun reading this book. and using it to trace my Cajun ancestry. Book is excellernt resource
Steep
I did not enjoy this book as some others that I have read about the Acadians. There were too many references to percentages & numbers making it read like an accountants journal.
fr0mTheSkY
Being a descendant of Cajun blood, I'm always looking for any and every resource available to learn about my people. Carl A. Brasseaux has done an excellent job at attempting to give myself and other readers an introspective look at the life of the Acadians living in southern Louisiana before, during, and after the Civil War. Unfortunately, very little is known about this colorful and oft misunderstood cultural group during this time. Therefore, Brasseaux had to rely heavily on records, tables, charts, etc. that range from loosely reliable census reports to agricultural records. Considering what Brasseaux had to work with, I believe that he did an excellent job of organizing this information and putting it into a readable text.

After reading the book, I've realized that my cultural group was not only looked down upon during the modern era covered in Shane K. Bernard's "The Cajuns: Americanization of a People," but we were also outcasts during the time covered in Brasseaux's book. In short, the life and times of the Cajun people have often been scarred by oppression, hate, and an unhealthy ignorance of the culture that has lead many to believe we are all dumb, lazy idiots whose only goal in life is to have a good time with as little physical labor as possible.

Brasseaux's book, being primarily based on numbers, often gets weighed down by the records and charts that can sometimes lose the reader. Other than that, this book is worth the time to read. It isn't a very happy read, but it is full of information and an exhaustive list of references that lead the reader to further study.

Also, after reading this book, anyone with an ounce of Cajun blood in them will likely have a sour taste in their mouth for one A.W. Waud. You'll have to read the book to know what I'm talking about.
Eseve
It is quite difficult to reconstruct many details of Louisiana's history in the 19th century because of the scarcity of documents. Brasseaux, however, gives a very good sketch of what went on. He takes us to the time of the transfer of Louisiana from France to the United States and how little the Acadians cared about the politics of the time. He illustrates the differences between the prarie Acadians and the river Acadians. During the War Between the states, the river Acadians were mainly Confederates while the prarie Acadians were mainly seen as Unionists. He showed how slavery affected these two groups differently; the prarie Acadians were mainly ranchers and owned few if any slaves while the river parish Acadians were more in sync with the rest of the plantation society and usually had many slaves. He also gets into the differences between the Creoles and the Acadians and how both societies merged by the end of the 19th century. He shows how negative stereotypes about Acadians were spread by travelers who only took a passing glance at the society that appeared foreign to them.
My most interesting impression about the book was the transformation of the Acadian people from a very peaceful society to a more violent society with the introduction of "vigilante" groups of extralegal law enforcers. These groups were the result of rising crime and banditry in some areas where people took justice into their own hands.
Finally, the most telling part is how the War Between the States destroyed the economy that did not recover until the second world war. The federal forces destroyed many of the levees around the wetlands and rivers that caused much flooding and destruction so that the agricultural output was decimated.
This is an interesting read for anyone interested in the sketchy history of the Acadians of the 19th century.
Brasseaux's examination of the development of the Cajun identity during the 1800s is an interesting social history, but its format leaves a little to be desired. Instead of following things chronologically, he examines changes in different aspects of Cajun society -- economic life, social class/status, political participation, crime/justice/vigilantism, folklife, etc. -- in isolation. While this does lead to an interesting, in-depth analysis of these aspects of society, it also makes for jarring reading. This focus shifts, however, in the chapter on Cajun reaction to the U.S. Civil War. According to the introduction, this was Brasseaux's original area of interest, and it shows. He does an excellent job of illuminating the general indifference to the Confederate government and the government's many attempts to draft Cajuns into gray uniforms.
Acadian to Cajun: Transformation of a People, 1803-1877 download epub
Americas
Author: Carl A. Brasseaux
ISBN: 0878055835
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi; 1st trade pbk edition (November 1, 1992)
Pages: 276 pages