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Division Street: America download epub

by Studs Terkel


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Division Street, Studs Terkel’s first book of oral history, established his reputation as America’s foremost oral historian and as one of those rare thinkers who is actually willing to go out and talk to the incredible people of this country (in the words of Tom Wolfe).

Division Street, Studs Terkel’s first book of oral history, established his reputation as America’s foremost oral historian and as one of those rare thinkers who is actually willing to go out and talk to the incredible people of this country (in the words of Tom Wolfe). Viewing the inhabitants of a single city.

Louis "Studs" Terkel (May 16, 1912 – October 31, 2008) was an American author, historian, actor, and broadcaster. He received the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1985 for The Good War and is best remembered for his oral histories. He received the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1985 for The Good War and is best remembered for his oral histories of common Americans, and for hosting a long-running radio show in Chicago. Terkel was born to Russian Jewish immigrants, Samuel Terkel, a tailor, and Anna (Annie) Finkel, a seamstress, in New York City.

Division Street, Studs Terkel’s first book of oral history, established his reputation as America’s foremost oral historian and as one of those rare thinkers who is actually willing to go out and talk to the incredible people of this country (in the words of Tom Wolfe)

Division Street: America, Studs Terkel's first book of oral history, established his reputation as America's foremost oral historian and as "one of those rare thinkers who is actually willing to go out and talk to the incredible people of this country" (in the words of Tom Wolfe).

Division Street: America, Studs Terkel's first book of oral history, established his reputation as America's foremost oral historian and as "one of those rare thinkers who is actually willing to go out and talk to the incredible people of this country" (in the words of Tom Wolfe). Viewing the inhabitants of a single city, Chicago, as a microcosm of the nation at large, Division Street: America chronicles the thoughts and feelings of some seventy people from widely varying backgrounds in terms of class, race, and personal history.

Division Street: America is Studs Terkel’s look at twentieth century urban life in and around Chicago. Street-wise Kid Pharaoh offers insight on the nature of success and so does Benny Bearskin from his Native American perspective. He included interviews with immigrants from other lands, like George Drossos from Greece, and those who migrated to Chicago looking for work such as Eva Barnes from rural Illinois and Mrs. Thacker and her son, Danny from Kentucky. Terkel interviews urban dwellers that aim high (Lucy Jefferson and Judy Huff) and high school drop-outs who are just keeping on (Jimmy White and Lilly Lowell).

Division Street: America" is the book that first made Studs Terkel's reputation as the country's foremost oral historian, as "more than a writer. a national resource," in the words of John Kenneth Galbraith. Indeed, the people in Division Street were so compelling that Terkel revisited many of them for his recent bestseller, Race, showing how their opinions had changed and their prejudices had grown in the intervening decades.

Division Street, Studs Terkel's first book of oral history, established his reputation as America's foremost oral historian and as "one of those rare thinkers who is actually willing to go out and talk to the incredible people of this country" (in the words of Tom Wolfe). Viewing the inhabitants of a single city, Chicago, as a microcosm of the nation at large, Division Street chronicles the thoughts and feelings of some seventy people from widely varying backgrounds in terms of class, race, and personal history.

Division Street: America. Published by New Press, The. ISBN 10: 1565840755 ISBN 13: 9781565840751. by. Terkel, Studs, 1912-. 1n. Publication date.

Other articles where Division Street: America is discussed: Studs Terkel: In 1967 he published Division Street . In 1967 he published Division Street: America, a book consisting of 70 conversations he had recorded with people in the Chicago area.

Other articles where Division Street: America is discussed: Studs Terkel: In 1967 he published Division Street: America, a book consisting of 70 conversations he had recorded with people in the Chicago area.

"Division Street: America" is the book that first made Studs Terkel's reputation as the country's foremost oral historian, as "more than a writer. . . a national resource," in the words of John Kenneth Galbraith. Indeed, the people in Division Street were so compelling that Terkel revisited many of them for his recent bestseller, Race, showing how their opinions had changed and their prejudices had grown in the intervening decades.

Comments: (7)

Global Progression
This is my book club selection for discussion next week and I'm totally enjoying it. I like the dialogue from different individuals and its a true depiction of Chicago at that time. I'm from Chicago so it is truly interesting to me.
Error parents
Great product. Fast service
Painwind
Old but still OK.
Beazerdred
it is studs telling it like it was a must read for studs fans
Jelar
This early effort stands with the best oral histories by author/radio host Stud's Terkel. In the mid-1960's Terkel took his tape recorder and let dozens of ordinary Chicagoans open up. Showing our City's diversity and divisions, we hear from executives, laborers, teachers, factory hands, social workers, rich, poor, and middle-class. Many are white, others are black ("Negro") or Latino, and they range from young swingers, to stressed-out parents, to aged retirees. Nearly all offer engaging tales, views, and outlooks. Among the major issues are life in Chicago, work, racial tensions, Vietnam, worship, Martin Luther King, the Bomb, opportunity, and (President) Lyndon Johnson. Anton Faber describes tool-and-die making in The Kaiser's Germany and then Chicago after arriving in 1912. Eva Barnes recalls coal miners, teen marriages, and bootlegging in her small town, plus working in Chicago's once-vast stockyards. Janice Majewski and her colleagues describe teaching at Marshall High School, then as now one of our city's more troubled facilities. Luci Jefferson arrived seeking work in the Great Migration of Southern Blacks, while activist Florence Scala fought City Hall. Many support the elusive goal of racial reconciliation, others nervously sense the decline of the traditional factory economy (replaced by white-collar services). As with many later Terkel efforts, the interviewees lean more left than right, with definite strains of anti-establshment sentiment - even among some we'd labed as distinctly "establishment."

Studs Terkel (1912-2008) made his mark by letting his subjects do the talking, and readers are better off for it. I'd have liked to hear from even more persons, plus those then fleeing to suburbia due to racial fears - what greater division existed both then and today? Still, this stellar book is as worth reading as many later Terkel efforts like HARD TIMES, WORKING, AMERICAN DREAMS, COMING OF AGE, etc.
Uleran
Division Street is Studs Terkel's attempt to make sense of Chicago. Terkel constructs Division Street in the "oral-history" style that he used in so many of his other works; specifically, he went out into Chicago, recorded a group of interviews with people who represented a cross section of 1960s Chicago, and then included verbatim quotes from his interviewees in Division Street.

Perhaps the best part of the book is the candor with which Terkel's subjects speak. I am not certain how Terkel got his interview subjects to drop their guards, but it seems that no subject is taboo. After reading the book, you do have the feeling that you "know" each of the interviewees on a fairly-deep level.

If I have a criticism of Division Street, it is that the book is something of a downer. Terkel's books focus on the disappointments and frustrations of life. In Division Street he is particularly concerned with race relations and The Bomb. Though I liked the book, prospective readers should be aware that it is by no means uplifting.

Each reader will come away with a feeling that he or she knows something of Chicago. In the end, Terkel leaves the conclusions up to the reader. I suspect, therefore, that different readers will interpret Division Street in different ways. For those readers who want to learn something about Chicagoans, the effort will be worthwhile.
lifestyle
"Division Street: America" isn't the first title that would pop into most people's minds when they think of Terkel, but I think it should be. I'll admit, I'm totally biased being in Chicago, but maybe that's the best way to read this book.

There is a lot of upheaval and suffering throughout the city due partly to the constantly changing demographics of the neighborhoods, and many of the ethnic pockets and pyschological ghettoes that Terkel talked to people in during 1967 were in the middle of those changes. From the near north area, tight in the protective grip of Mayor Daley to the old Eastern European neighborhoods of the north and west sides which would soon become almost purely Puerto Rican, Cuban and Mexican.

You can really see firsthand, how stupid, how intelligent, how altruistic and how mean people can be in a big city. That's the best part of this whole book: you're left at every page feeling that something monumental is taking place in urban America while the interviews are happening. Civil rights, white flight, Latin immigration, the decline of the manual labor factory job, Viet Nam, etc.

Reading this in 1967 must have been interesting, but knowing what we know about Chicago today and how it's still in a state of flux (and maybe always will be) is really a reason to go back. The problems, the people and the strange mix still exists throughout Division Street today; but thanks to Terkel, we have a little hindsight.
Division Street: America download epub
Americas
Author: Studs Terkel
ISBN: 1565840755
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: New Press, The; Reissue edition (April 1, 1993)
Pages: 381 pages