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The West Beyond the West: A History of British Columbia download epub

by Jean Barman


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British Columbia is regularly described in superlatives both positive and negative - most spectacular scenery, strangest politics, greatest environmental sensitivity, richest Aboriginal cultures, most aggressive resource exploitation, closest ties t. .

British Columbia is regularly described in superlatives both positive and negative - most spectacular scenery, strangest politics, greatest environmental sensitivity, richest Aboriginal cultures, most aggressive resource exploitation, closest ties to Asia. Jean Barman's The West beyond the West presents the history of the province in all its diversity and apparent contradictions.

Most books that attempt to portray a history of British Columbia will undoubtedly be contrasted against Margaret . Barman's book is no different.

Most books that attempt to portray a history of British Columbia will undoubtedly be contrasted against Margaret Ormsby's 1958 ". I agree that it does provide an excellent regional history of this province (thus making it a staple textbook for many university classes), yet it can also be viewed in the context of the changing historiography of British Columbia. Barman has chosen to focus on the many social aspects of . s history that may have been neglected in past works.

and its limits, 1871-1929 - The best and worst of times, 1918-1945 - The good life, 1945-1972 - Equality revolution, 1945-1980 - A fragile prosperity, 1972-1990 - The British Columbia identity.

Shelves: textbooks, history. The West Beyond the West’ was a brilliant work of narrative and scholarly history. Jean Barman did a great job at balancing readability (moving between diverse topics smoothly) with thoughtful insights into the history of British Columbia

Shelves: textbooks, history. Jean Barman did a great job at balancing readability (moving between diverse topics smoothly) with thoughtful insights into the history of British Columbia. I particularly enjoyed the parts where Barman explained how British Columbia developed against the odds geographically and politically (thanks in no small part to Governor James Douglas)

British Columbia – the very name resonates with the authority of Britain and empire. Names can be deceiving.

Published by: University of Toronto Press. Barman's deft scholarship is readily apparent and the book demands to be on the shelf of anyone with an interest in British Columbian or Canadian history. eISBN: 978-1-4426-8937-4. British Columbia – the very name resonates with the authority of Britain and empire. British Columbia was once a British colonial possession, initially two colonial possessions, but its history was not formed by Britain alone.

The Colony of British Columbia was a British Crown Colony that resulted from the . Donald J. Hauka, McGowan's War, Vancouver: 2003, New Star Books, . 46. Jean Barman, The West Beyond the West: A History of British Columbia, (Toronto: University of Toronto), . 1.

The Colony of British Columbia was a British Crown Colony that resulted from the amalgamation of the two former colonies, the Colony of Vancouver Island and the mainland Colony of British Columbia. The two former colonies were united in 1866, and the united colony existed until its incorporation into the Canadian Confederation in 1871. Archived from the original on 11 May 2013.

Barman begins her history with a description of native societies in the 18th century, and the changes . 3. First Encounters 17411825.

Barman begins her history with a description of native societies in the 18th century, and the changes effected by the arrival of Europeans. Subsequent chapters discuss the fur trade, the gold rush, English colonization, the Canadian confederation, and the trans-Canada railroad. Throughout, she focuses less on history made by the leaders in government and business and more on the ways in which ordinary people influenced the province.

Bibliography of British Columbia. This is a short bibliography of major works on the History of British Columbia. The West Beyond the West: A History of British Columbia U. of Toronto Press, 1991. Francis, Daniel, ed. Encyclopedia of British Columbia. 806 pp. Griffin, Harold. Vancouver: Commonwealth Fund, 1999.

Jean Barman is a historian of British Columbia. Born in Stephen, Minnesota, United States, Barman arrived in British Columbia in 1971. Her work The West Beyond the West: A History of British Columbia has been described as the "standard text on the subject. She has received the Lieutenant Governor's Medal for historical writing, and the 2006 City of Vancouver Book Award (for Stanley Park's Secret). She is a professor emerita at the University

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British Columbia is regularly described in superlatives both positive and negative - most spectacular scenery, strangest politics, greatest environmental sensitivity, richest Aboriginal cultures, most aggressive resource exploitation, closest ties to Asia. Jean Barman's The West beyond the West presents the history of the province in all its diversity and apparent contradictions. This critically acclaimed work is the premiere book on British Columbian history, with a narrative beginning at the point of contact between Native peoples and Europeans and continuing into the twenty-first century.

Barman tells the story by focusing not only on the history made by leaders in government but also on the roles of women, immigrants, and Aboriginal peoples in the development of the province. She incorporates new perspectives and expands discussions on important topics such as the province's relationship to Canada as a nation, its involvement in the two world wars, the perspectives of non-mainstream British Columbians, and its participation in recreation and sports including Olympics.

First published in 1991 and revised in 1996, this third edition of The West beyond the West has been supplemented by statistical tables incorporating the 2001 census, two more extensive illustration sections portraying British Columbia's history in images, and other new material bringing the book up to date. Barman's deft scholarship is readily apparent and the book demands to be on the shelf of anyone with an interest in British Columbian or Canadian history.


Comments: (6)

MOQ
I bought this for a history class and its a very complete account. Loved the class and the book too.
Negal
I would just add a few more points to the review that was already written on this book.
Most books that attempt to portray a history of British Columbia will undoubtedly be contrasted against Margaret Ormsby's 1958 "B.C.: A History". Barman's book is no different. I agree that it does provide an excellent regional history of this province (thus making it a staple textbook for many university classes), yet it can also be viewed in the context of the changing historiography of British Columbia. Barman has chosen to focus on the many social aspects of B.C.'s history that may have been neglected in past works. The previously mentioned work by Ormsby would be a case in point - "B.C.: A History" spent a disproportionate ammount of time on BC's pre-confederation, colonial past. Where Ormsby's emphasis was put on individual accomplishment - usually by white men - to the detriment of other facets of society (such as Natives, Women, Immigrants, etc. . . ), Barman, and the new generation of historians since the 1950s, have sought to write a more inculsive history. And this is what "The West Beyond The West" is. Unfortunately, I believe it has gone to far.
This is a similar point that has been made by Robin Fischer (another BC historian) on a variety of other occasions; that the emphasis on "social" history in this province has come at the expense of a greater understanding of "political" history. If you are thus going to be reading "The West Beyond The West" to try and find a deeper understanding of BC's political tradition you are going to be hard pressed to find it in this book.
Mmsa
I obtained this book in 1998, prior to our cruise to Alaska by way of the "Inland Passage" of Canada. The Inland passage is a shipping route that follows a course along the coast of Canada between the off shore islands of western Canada and the mainland of Canada. This inland passage protects the ship, in large part from the tempestuousness of the open sea. The ship we took to Alaska boarded at the Canadian port of Vancouver. While waitying for the ship we took time to see both Vancouver and Victoria--the provincial capital of British Columbia. This history of British Columbia proved me with a wealth of information about Canada's most western province.
Lbe
This is one of the best regional histories that this reviewer has ever read. The book imparts a real flavor of the overall history of the Province of British Columbia.
British Columbia, Canada's most western province, is part of the Pacific rim with Chile, Peru, California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Japan, China, South East Asia and Indonesia. As such, British Columbia tends to share with more history with those areas that it does with the more easterly parts of Canada and the United States.
Until recently the western regions of the United States and Canada have suffered from a lack of adequate regional histories. Barman's book neatly fills this void in regards to British Columbia and brings the reader right up to the present with the resignation of Michael Harcourt as the premier of the New Democratic Party government in 1996. The charts in the Appendix of the book add a great deal to the historian's appreciation of this book.
Blackworm
Ever since I forced myself through the pages of Barman's much-hyped history of my province I have been wanting to analyze all its many shortcomings. Unlike the other reviewers, I thought this to be one of the most poorly-written (and over-written) of all BC histories. I have given it three stars rather than two because of the amount of detail it DOES contain. However, so much of this detail is misanalyzed or misrendered that, in terms of giving an appreciation of the flavour of BC history, it does little more than trot out all the usual politically-correct latterday assumptions about BC and, in many cases, glosses over or completely ignores some of the most interesting bits.

Barman lives in BC, but her life there has been limited to Point Grey, aka the UBC campus, and it is clear she does not have any idea of the rest of the province. Aside from her annoying habit of not capitalizing "the Interior" or "the Central Interior" most of her book focusses on issues that have to do with her own area of academic interest (sociology). Her obsession with denominational analyses of society and education is completely out-of-place for a province whose history is more driven by those who had either abandoned religion, or taken up more eccentric or extreme religions.

In my own opinion, comparing it to other writing on BC, even Bowering's also-flawed book, this is not a very readable book, despite the blurb on its cover about it being "wonderful and evocative" - perhaps a reference to her many quotations from the writings of Emily Carr. Among those quotations was one that struck my eye and serves as an example of Barman's glossing-over or miscomprehension of detail. Carr describes a journey up the PGE line and Barman quotes this journey as an example of the life of desperation of the 1930s, the train being full of haggard-looking pioneers and squawling children. Carr's description of miners in the Pioneer Mine in the Bridge River Country paints a picture of misery. Actually, the area into which Carr journeyed was one in which she did not stay long and obviously did not much appreciate; that area was one of the "boom" areas in BC in the 1930s and was largely immune from the depradations afflicting the rest of the province at that time; the dirty, tired miners she saw coming up out of the lift at Pioneer were part of a dynamic and hard-working local society; the haggard-looking folks on the train were typical of teh whole Lillooet Country even into the 1970s. That Barman could even mention that area without quoting other, more relevant and accurate descriptions of it by Margaret "Ma" Murray or the dynamism of characters such as Charlie Cunningham or Ned Smith makes me doubt the value of her descriptions of other parts of the province. Another train-related error has to do with her comment on the increased contact with the Prairies in the 1950s, which she suggests had to do with the opening of the PGE line to BC's Peace River Country - which was in fact as isolated from the rest of the Prairies as it was from the rest of BC and was as unlikely a route as any for migration from the Prairies to BC, given that isolation and the fact that the southern passes are the route by which the Prairie influx came (considering her interest in denominational politics, it is curious she does not mention the mass movement of Prairie Mennonites into the Fraser Valley in this regard). Whether the PGE even had passenger service to beyond Prince George to Fort St. John I am unsure of, but doubtful. This was one of many passages that had me wondering if she'd ever been farther from Point Grey than, perhaps, Surrey.

I would have to force myself to read this book again to find more examples of the shortcomings of this work, but I found it too much of a pain from the very first pages onwards. One that comes to mind is her analysis of the reasons for anti-Oriental sentiment leading up to the Anti-Oriental Riots of 1907. She dismisses the white feeling that the Chinese were willing to work for a third of the wages of others as a "perception", following up with a "the reality was" that the low wages paid by Chinese snakehead companies to other Chinese were much higher than those they could have earned back in Kwangtung. The truth is that BOTH are realities, and of course conflicting ones at that. The deeper issue of racism here - that the railway companies and others who were willing and ready to pay lower wages to the Chinese was FAR more racist than the reaction of out-of-work non-Chinese workers (including Indians and East Indians) in response - goes unobserved. But that, of course, would be politically incorrect.

Similarly, the now-conventional description of Gov. Douglas as "racist" is given in knee-jerk fashion without much discussion. The man had a native wife, was a mulatto himself(actually more maroon or octoroon), defending the rights of Chinese miners and the native population against the demands of Americans and newcomers from the Canada who were hostile to them, yet because he might describe the French-Canadians one way and the Hawaiians another, this is pronounced as an example of "racism". Curiously the rabid racism of Seymour and Trutch is passed over without much comment at all....
LivingCross
Up until I read this book I did not understand BC politics or Native issues. The early workings of the political parties are uncovered along with their philosophies. Barman graphically describes British Columbia over the century capturing the spirit of what it means to be a British Columbian.
The West Beyond the West: A History of British Columbia download epub
Americas
Author: Jean Barman
ISBN: 0802093094
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 3rd edition (August 25, 2007)
Pages: 449 pages