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Cannoneers in Gray: The Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee (Alabama Fire Ant) download epub

by Larry J. Daniel


Epub Book: 1523 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1390 kb.

Book Description The University of Alabama Press, United States, 2005.

Book Description The University of Alabama Press, United States, 2005. Larry Daniel traces the four-year history of the artillery branch of the Army of Tennessee from its organization through its scattered demise at the war's end.

Cannoneers in Gray: The Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee, 1861-1865. Cannoneers in Gray: The Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee, 1861-1865.

Winner of the 1984 Mrs. Simon Baruch University Award from the United Daughters of the Confederacy Winner of the 1984 Fletcher Pratt Award from the Civil War Roundtable of New York.

Cannoneers in Gray book . A delightful surprise. Published July 25th 2015 by Fire Ant Books (first published December 12th 1984). This book details the troubled history of the Army of Tennessee's artillery arm, discussing organization, weapons, tactics, battles, morale, and army politics. Daniel, ever a master of a good phrase, ends with this appropriate line: "Thus, the western Confederate long arm, the "neglected branch of the army," as Melancthon Smith referred to it, passed from existence to be remembered only by the field pieces that would one day dot the battlefield parks.

The Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee. Published May 22, 2005 by Fire Ant Books.

Contributor: Larry J. Daniel. Imprint: The University of Alabama Press. ISBN13: 9780817302030. Number of Pages: 246. Format: Hardback. Publisher: The University of Alabama Press. Release Date: 1985-06-30. Saver Delivery In-Stock products are usually delivered in 3-6 working days.

The story of the 'Western long arm - the artillery of the major force of the Confederacy in the western theater. Cannoneers in Gray : The Story of the Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee, 1861-1865.

Larry Daniels, in Cannoneers in Gray: The Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee, 1861-1865. Tuscaloosa, AL: Fire Ant Books, 2005). lists Trigg's Battery as the Clark County Light Artillery. This confusion was apparently caused by the transfer of several former members of Trigg's Arkansas Battery to Roberts' Clark County Artillery following the break up of Trigg's Battery. Other histories have identified Trigg's unit as "The Austin Artillery" or "Auston's Artillery".

Cannoneers in Gray: The Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee (Alabama Fire Ant) Jul 25, 2015. Soldiering in the Army of Tennessee: A Portrait of Life in a Confederate Army (Civil War America) by Larry J. Daniel (1991-12-14) Jan 1, 1791. The battery then became part of The Army of Middle Tennessee when that unit was organized in October 1862. mis-identifies Trigg's Battery as the Clark County Light Artillery. This confusion was apparently caused by the transfer of several former members of Trigg's/Austin's Arkansas Battery to Roberts' Clark County Artillery following the breakup of Trigg's Battery. On July 23, 1862, a number of men from Captain Thomas.

This enlarged edition of Cannoneers in Gray provides new detail concerning the activities of various military units operating in key campaigns of the western theater of the Civil War - at Stones River, Missionary Ridge, Kennesaw Mountain, Shiloh, Peachtree Creek. Larry Daniel traces the four-year history of the artillery branch of the Army of Tennessee from its organization through its scattered demise at the war's end. He provides evidence to show that Civil War canons were of little consequence when used as offensive weapons but could be highly effective as weapons of defense. Daniel includes five new detailed maps of campaigns and battles that are central to his discussion of larger issues, such as command and strategy on the western front. He has consulted and incorporated many new primary sources that more fully document his original work, first published in 1984.

Comments: (5)

Wat!?
This would be a great book for someone who is getting started in civil war history or just wants some quick facts about a battle or thearter of operations. Has great before and post battle info on the differant batteries involed. Some training and how the batteries were set up. Maps are very basic(battle placement only).Quick read. Very good for young readers.
Cha
Well done in overall terms, but more charts, detailing which batteries and battalions were at which battles would have been helpful. Trying to sort out which ones were in the army in Oct for the kentucky campaign vs, those at Murfreesboro, for example, is a challenge using this book.
Yananoc
Larry does a good job on his books.
Stick
The book contains a great deal of solid information. It is well researched and well written. However, the information is sometimes hard to locate rapidly. The index could stand a good update. Recommended.
Mautaxe
(This review pertains to the 2nd edition and probably includes some enhancements over the first.) This was Larry Daniel's first work and it filled a large gap by explaining and reviewing the history of the artillery in the western theater. Daniel has also authored "Confederate Cannon Foundries" and his in-depth knowledge in the unusual types of western CSA ordnance is important in explaining the Army of Tennessee's artillery.

The history of the artillery of the Army of Tennessee is one of painful disappointment offset with a few successes. As the author explains, much of the blame for the artillery's plight came from deficiencies in army command and organization. This was exacerbated by neglect of its priority by those in Richmond, shortages of material, horses, and fodder. Another factor is that the more rugged terrain and less developed road network made it difficult to employ artillery as effectively in the west. Finally, unlike Henry Hunt of the Union Army of the Potomac, there is no central figure on which to focus in understanding the AoT's artillery.

The Army of Tennessee suffered one of the great early disasters of the war at Fort Donelson under Floyd and Pillow. It would suffer many further indignities under Bragg. Bragg did more than anyone else to shape the AoT's artillery arm, but not for the better. Cronyism plagued Bragg's approach to his army and to its long arm, loyalty over competence. Bragg saw his artillery in the light of the past war instead of the present. He stuck to the obsolete distribution of batteries to brigades, and allowed his artillery to operate incoherently and in piecemeal fashion. When officers showed initiative he swatted them down over protocol.

The AoT artillery never gained its footing for long before disaster struck once again. Joe Johnston's tenure was perhaps the only time the western cannoneers were properly organized and prepared. Unfortunately, Joe was hesitant to commit his army to battle, and control passed to Hood. The army declined rapidly under Hood's aggressive command, and the long arm suffered so severely that it was almost entirely unable to join Johnston again in the Carolinas. None of the AoT's batteries was present for the surrender of Johnston's army in Durham.

Some reviewers I respect have complained that Daniel's first edition is too brief compared to those about the AoP, and ANV's artillery, or not useful for wargamers. I can't comment on the first edition, but for the 2nd I disagree for several reasons: 1. The other organizations were two to four times as large on average--and therefore require a much higher page count for the same breadth and depth. 2. Daniel's recounting of artillery engagements is more factual and concise rather than stylized narrative or divergence into other theaters. 3. Daniel's work contains frequent detailed tables of organization and armament by battery, as well as ammunition counts, and several battle maps. 4. Primary accounts of the western CSA long arm is sparse and less celebrated than that of eastern artillery organizations. 5. Another lesser factor is that page count doesn't correspond to word count, the other texts contain 20-25% less text per page.

Sure an even more detailed account would be appreciated, but the approach Daniel has taken fits his subject. There are some irritating mistakes, such as the consistent misspelling of Resaca--roughly a dozen times.

I believe this 2nd edition will largely fit the needs of those wanting to understand the western artillery arm, and will also prove a valuable resource for the war gamer.
Cannoneers in Gray: The Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee (Alabama Fire Ant) download epub
Americas
Author: Larry J. Daniel
ISBN: 081735168X
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Fire Ant Books; Revised edition (May 22, 2005)
Pages: 288 pages