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Middletown, America: One Town's Passage from Trauma to Hope download epub

by Gail Sheehy


Epub Book: 1987 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1218 kb.

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Middletown, America is her fourteenth book. The mother of two daughters, she lives between New York and California, and on the Web, where you can visit her at ww. ailsheehy. While the book definitiely reflects the sadness experienced by 9/11 victims and their survivors in the one town outside of NYC that was most affected by the 9/11 tragedy, it also is uplifting as it details the struggles and how each person uniquely found a way to overcome their struggles.

Gail Sheehy spent the better part of two years with those left behind–women, men, and children–as they put . Under Sheehy’s watchful eyes, the passage from hopelessness to recovery in Middletown, New Jersey, sheds light for all of us on journeys from loss to renewal.

Gail Sheehy spent the better part of two years with those left behind–women, men, and children–as they put their lives back together. She met with police officers who worked tirelessly at Ground Zero, religious leaders, and unsung heroes who committed themselves to healing their wounded brethren. Sheehy illuminates every stage of a tumultuous passage–from shock, passivity, and panic attacks to the commitment to constructing new lives. Praise for middletown, america.

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One Town’s Passage from Trauma to Hope. Sheehy (Understanding Men’s Passages, 1998, et. followed a selection of families for the first 18 months after the attacks, through the disbelief and insulating numbness of the first days, through anger and tests of faith, through the discovery of resilience and independence, through relapses, and-for some-new lives and loves. Hope and other punchlines.

As the second anniversary of 9-11 approached, I decided to purchase Middletown, America.

An excellent view, and very much recommended! An intimate look at the tragedy of 9-11 - Must read!!! Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 15 years ago. As the second anniversary of 9-11 approached, I decided to purchase Middletown, America

Middletown, America is a book of hope. All Americans were hit with some degree of trauma on September 11, 2001, but no place was hit harder than Middletown, New Jersey.

Middletown, America is a book of hope. Gail Sheehy spent the better part of two years walking the journey from grief toward renewal with fifty members of the community that lost more people in the World Trade Center than any other outside New York City. Her subjects are the women, men, and children who remained after the devastation and who are putting their lives back to-gether. Middletown, America is a book of hope. Category: Domestic Politics.

Author and journalist Gail Sheehy talked about her book, Middletown, America: One Town’s Passage from Trauma to Hope, published by Random House. The book is a study of Middletown, New Jersey, an affluent suburb that lost fifty residents in the September 11 terrorist attacks. Ms. Sheehy conducted more than nine hundred interviews with survivors, widows, religious leaders, family members, police officers, firefighters, and neighbors. She recounts the experiences and reactions of the Middletown community. After her presentation, she answered questions from members of the audience.

The single event that we know as 9/11 is over, but the shock waves continue to radiate outward, generated by orange alerts, terrorism lockdowns, and the shrinking of personal liberties we once took for granted. The stories in this book, of real people faced with extraordinary trauma and gradually transcending it, are the best antidote to our fears. Middletown, America is a book of hope.All Americans were hit with some degree of trauma on September 11, 2001, but no place was hit harder than Middletown, New Jersey. Gail Sheehy spent the better part of two years walking the journey from grief toward renewal with fifty members of the community that lost more people in the World Trade Center than any other outside New York City. Her subjects are the women, men, and children who remained after the devastation and who are putting their lives back to-gether. Sheehy tells the story of four widowed moms from New Jersey who started out scarcely knowing the difference between the House and the Senate, yet turned their sorrow and anger into action and became formidable witnesses to the failures of the country’s leadership to connect the dots before September 11. Sheehy follows the four moms as they fight White House attempts to thwart the independent commission investigating 9/11 and expose efforts at a cover-up. What would become of the young wives carrying children their husbands would never see, wives who had watched their dreams literally go up in smoke in that amphitheater of death across the river? Amazingly, each finds her own door to the light. Here, too, is the story of the widow and widower who met in the waiting room of a mental-health agency and brought each other back from the brink of despair across a bridge of love. Sheehy also reveals how bereft mothers who will never have another son or daughter found reasons to recommit to life. And she follows in the footsteps of the robbed children, documenting the incredible resilience of four-year-olds, the anger of teenagers, the courage of sisters and brothers. Sheehy follows survivors who escaped the burning towers only to find themselves trapped inside a tower of inner torment, from which it took love, family, and faith to free themselves. She is taken into the confi-dence of the night crew at Ground Zero, police officers who worked in that pit for eight months straight and then faced the “returning home” phenomenon. She recounts the confessions of religious leaders who struggled to explain the inexplicable to their flocks. Mental-health professionals confide in her, as do corporate chiefs, educators, friends and neigh-bors, town officials, and volunteers who rose to the occasion and committed themselves to healing their wounded community. As a journalist who conducted more than nine hundred interviews, Gail Sheehy is an impeccable researcher. As a writer with a novelistic gift, she weaves the individual stories into a compelling narrative. Middletown, America illuminates every stage of a tumultuous passage—from shock, passivity, and panic attacks, to rising anger and deep grieving, and on to the secret romances and startling relapses, the realignment of faith, the return of a capacity to love and be loved, and, finally, the commitment to constructing new lives.

Comments: (7)

Levion
I will never forget listening to the news on my way to work on September 11th, 2001 unable to believe that what I was hearing could possibly be true. Following were weeks of confusion, fear, and sorrow. I could not watch the videos of the towers crumbling, the bodies falling through the sky, the photos of bereaved families.

Now, 16 years later, I want to know more about what happened to the families of the survivors, the emergency crews, the people living in other parts of the country not directly affected, but wounded by this atrocity.

Gail Sheehy's account of the impact of this disaster is personal; you feel the pain and the courage of the widows, and they were largely widows, and families of those closely affected through their associations or their efforts to support and help the victims.

This is not fiction, but a well researched account of one of the worst disasters in modern day history. I would also suggest reading Julia Frey's "Balconey View - a 9/11 Diary" that chronicles the experiences of a woman living within blocks of the Twin Towers on that fateful day. Her account, intertwined with the difficulty of caring for a seriously ill spouse, is riviting. Julia's, like Gail's book, lends hope and support for anyone dealing with life's losses and the need to move on.
Feri
I stumbled across this book 14 years after publication. It gives so much insight into what occurred and we should all be grateful to the author for bringing forth the truths of this sad event.
The bravery and strength of the survivors is especially meaningful as I
recently experienced loss of a spouse.
This book will be suggested to friends/ family/ book club.
Ricep
For me this was not just the stories of the people directly affected by the attack on the World Trade Center. Rather it is a journey into and through the depths of grief. The people highlighted in this book, widows, siblings, survivors, witnesses, rescue-workers, take on the horror of 9/11 in different ways. Their recovery too must be as unique as they themselves. This is a hope-filled story, illuminating the fact that as much as a group may share a tragic event, their internalizing and their movement to recovery is theirs alone. Others may help by walking near us, but only we can heal ourselves.
Unirtay
A moving book, clearly written and informative. Helped me to remember that this type of disaster is never really "over" for those personally involved and that others should not forget that.
Nargas
It pays to be a wealthy Republican. Some widows and widowers of those killed on September 11, 2001 got as much as 1.7 million dollars from the federal government. The fund congress set aside for these widows had no cap and one person even got six million dollars. These widows lived in multi -million dollar mansions.
Why didn’t these women most of whom had college degrees get jobs? Ginny Bauer, one of the widows, explained, “I felt like it would be unfair for me to drastically change my lifestyle just because my husband was killed.”
What did the survivors of Hurricane Katrina get? Katrina is not mentioned in this book, but I couldn't help but make comparisons. Sad.
I am not downplaying the horror of what happened to the survivors of 9/11. But poorer Americans can’t even get health care. Their homes are foreclosed.
Ex-president, Jimmy Carter observed, “Congress is so traumatized by 9/11, that it can’t think straight.”
Congress is composed of wealthy people who will rush to help other wealthy people. Those of us on Main Street are on our own.
This is a depressing read about very wealthy people demanding more and more in services and government handouts. This book is about the real welfare cheats.
When disaster strikes, I hope help is there for all of us, but millionaires don't need handouts.
Preve
Sad that they went thru so much sadness and then didn't get the deserved respect and answers they needed from our government.
MrCat
I liked the idea of the book, following a few people/families affected by the tragic events of 9/1, curious bc it referenced my hometown area. But there were some mistakes about the area itself, and some unfounded generalizations about the local residents. I read the whole book and took the good from it, but the comments by the author that seemed judgemental, almost gossip-like to me, I had to try to disregard.
I couldn't put the book down. At first I was concerned that reading the book might be a depressing experience. While the book definitiely reflects the sadness experienced by 9/11 victims and their survivors in the one town outside of NYC that was most affected by the 9/11 tragedy, it also is uplifting as it details the struggles and how each person uniquely found a way to overcome their struggles. I was truly surprised at how much the survivors had to go through in order to get their just due.
Middletown, America: One Town's Passage from Trauma to Hope download epub
Americas
Author: Gail Sheehy
ISBN: 0375508627
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Random House; First Edition edition (September 2, 2003)
Pages: 448 pages