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Welfare Reform in the Early Republic: A Brief History with Documents (The Bedford Series in History and Culture) download epub

by Seth Rockman


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Start by marking Welfare Reform in the Early Republic: A Brief . Paperback, 187 pages. Published October 23rd 2002 by Bedford/St.

Start by marking Welfare Reform in the Early Republic: A Brief History with Documents as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Seth Rockman uses documents ranging from sermons to almshouse admission rolls to show how reformers investigated the causes of poverty and pursued solutions that ranged from m In the decades following the American Revolution, elected officials, moral crusaders, and relief administrators scrutinized the public welfare programs that assisted thousands of impoverished people.

Seth Rockman uses documents ranging from sermons to almshouse admission rolls to show how reformers . Dr. Rockman's subtitle is an accurate disclosure; this is indeed a "brief history", a mere 28-page introduction to a selection of 25 documents

Seth Rockman uses documents ranging from sermons to almshouse admission rolls to show how reformers investigated the causes of poverty and pursued solutions that ranged from massive of the poor to the total abolition of public charity - issues that are remarkably similar to the welfare debates of today. Also included are headnotes to the documents. Rockman's subtitle is an accurate disclosure; this is indeed a "brief history", a mere 28-page introduction to a selection of 25 documents.

In the decades following the American Revolution, elected officials, moral crusaders, and relief administrators scrutinized the public welfare programs that assisted thousands of impoverished people

Publisher: Waveland Press. In the decades following the American Revolution, elected officials, moral crusaders, and relief administrators scrutinized the public welfare programs that assisted thousands of impoverished people. The author uses an array of documents-from sermons to almshouse admission rolls-to show how reformers investigated the causes of poverty and pursued solutions that varied from massive of the poor to the total abolition of public charity. These issues are remarkably similar to the welfare debates of today.

At the SMF, Joanne will be developing and running the programme of support offered to our undergraduate students. The growth of the middle classes in the 18th and 19th centuries gave rise to increased public participation on the part of women

At the SMF, Joanne will be developing and running the programme of support offered to our undergraduate students. The growth of the middle classes in the 18th and 19th centuries gave rise to increased public participation on the part of women. As her biographer notes, Richmond sought to balance modern social scientific method, professional expertise, and legislative reform with nineteenth century ideals of personal influence, citizen participation, and individual moral reform.

General Interest In the decades following the American Revolution, elected officials, moral crusaders, and relief administrators scrutinized the public welfare programs that assisted thousands of impoverished people.

Childhood and Child Welfare in the Progressive Era: A Brief History with Documents (The Bedford Series in History and Culture). Get started today for free.

Feel free to highlight your textbook rentals. Included with your book. Free shipping on rental returns. 21-day refund guarantee Learn More. Popular items with this book. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Waveland Press, Incorporated.

Titles that complement the material cov- ered in Chapter 9 include Creating an American Culture, 1775–1800: A Brief History with Documents, by Eve Korn- feld; Welfare Reform in the Early Republic: A Brief History with Documents, by Seth Rockman; and Judith Sargent Murray.

Titles that complement the material cov- ered in Chapter 9 include Creating an American Culture, 1775–1800: A Brief History with Documents, by Eve Korn- feld; Welfare Reform in the Early Republic: A Brief History with Documents, by Seth Rockman; and Judith Sargent Murray: A Brief Biography with Documents, by Sheila L. Skemp. For descriptions of these titles and how you might use them in your course, visit bedfordstmartins. For Students Online Study Guide at bedfordstmartins. com/henretta Each of the activities listed below includes short-answer questions.

New & Forthcoming Titles The Bedford Series in History and Culture. A Brief History with Documents. New & Forthcoming Titles. Home New & Forthcoming Titles. Series: The Bedford Series in History and Culture.

In the decades following the American Revolution, elected officials, moral crusaders, and relief administrators scrutinized the public welfare programs that assisted thousands of impoverished people. Seth Rockman uses documents ranging from sermons to almshouse admission rolls to show how reformers investigated the causes of poverty and pursued solutions that ranged from massive institutionalization of the poor to the total abolition of public charity — issues that are remarkably similar to the welfare debates of today. Also included are headnotes to the documents, questions for consideration, an annotated chronology, suggestions for further reading, and an index.

Comments: (5)

Redfury
Dr. Rockman's subtitle is an accurate disclosure; this is indeed a "brief history", a mere 28-page introduction to a selection of 25 documents. That brevity is all to Dr. Rockman's credit! His introduction is succinct and lucid. In it, he summarizes, with concise impartiality, the diverse thoughts about poverty and welfare expressed in the early years of the USA, beginning with the climate of opinion in England and its colonies in the century prior to the American Revolution. Many readers, I suppose, will be surprised that "welfare" and welfare reform were even under discussion in the early Republic, but the main lesson of Dr. Rockman's research is that neither the needs of the poor nor the means of assistance have changed much in the 220-some years of constitutional government. The documents that Dr. Rockman has selected, with a few modernizations of syntax, would serve just as well to express the platforms of both political parties today. A few of them would serve, indeed, to express the more radical positions advocated by ardent liberals and fervid reactionaries.

Rockman's introduction is so 'fair and balanced' that it could serve as a primer for all Americans interested in welfare reform. I'd love to see it printed as a broadside and distributed at rallies for and against President Obama's proposals. The documents, I'm afraid, make rather dry reading unless the reader is actively investigating their subject, either as a historian or as an advocate of reform.

Here are a few tidbits from Dr. Rockman's intro:

"Poverty was also a very real problem [in the Federalist era] for public officials, political thinkers, and beleaguered taxpayers... In Salem, Massachusetts, for example, expenditures on the poor accounted for neary 50 percent of the town's 1816 budget."

"In 1830, two thousand New Yorkers spent time in the city's almshouse, while another three thousand families received outdoor relief. Roughly ten percent of the city's population tapped into the public welfare system." ['Outdoor' relief refers to welfare assistance outside any institution such as the almshouses of that era, or the homeless shelters of today. The demographics of poverty in New York in 1830 were astonishingly similar to the present; most recipients were truly needy - the infirm of body or mind, orphans and the aged, mothers and children without male support, and immigrants, especially Irish, unable to find a niche in the economy that paid well enough to sustain them. Just like today, African-Americans were disproportionately poor, and in the same vicious circle, their poverty was stigmatized as the sign of their inferiority. As Billie Holliday sang, "Them that's got shall get; them that's not shall lose."]

"The rhetoric of moral reform offered one explanation: The poor were themselves to blame. Decrying the sinfulness of American society, moral reformers created a powerful stereotype of the typical relief recipient. ... It also became easier for prosperous urban residents to criticize the poor because they were increasingly strangers to one another. Whereas the rich and poor rubbed elbows in the mixed neighborhoods of colonial-era cities, the early republic witnessed the emergence of working-class districts like the infamous New York slum, Five Points. Residential segregation made it easier to depict the poor as different and defective. [Oh boy, does that sound familiar!] As moral reformers circulated tehir reports of urban vice throughout the country, rural Americans were confirmed in their antipathy towards cities and their inhabitants."

" ... local and state governments administered a network of relief services that ultimately kept most poverty-stricken Americans from perishing in the streets. Itw ould be a mistake to imagine some moment in the national past when the private efforts of kin, clergy, and charities alone fulfilled the needs of impoverished Americans." !!!!!

"In many regards, early republic welfare reform marked an effort to reconcile the political inheritance of the American Revolution with the new social realities of capitalism." [Now there's some unfinished business!]

Ultimately, the impact of Dr. Rockman's essay is disheartening. Nothing has changed in the terms of debate, no consensus has been approached, the gap between the beneficiaries of those 'new realities of capitalism' and the victims of it has opened ever wider, and the poor are still with us.]
Rias
Great read.
Androrim
I have always been skeptical about ordering books from others that I could not see; but this book that I ordered is in GREAT condition. I also received the book in a timely manner, which came in handy since this book is for college, I highly recommend buying from this person/place.
Wenes
Yes, Rockman just presents a brief history text. But the original source documents are the main attraction. They let the modern reader grasp some of the issues of welfare, as they were then perceived, for better or worse, by various contemporary reformers.

A common theme is the idea that able-bodied people be expected to perform some labour, in return for welfare charity. Conversely, it was also acknowledged that those physically unable to work should be cared for, albeit in typically a very minimal fashion. By the standards of those times and ours.
Nalmezar
Basic, for college history.
Welfare Reform in the Early Republic: A Brief History with Documents (The Bedford Series in History and Culture) download epub
Americas
Author: Seth Rockman
ISBN: 0312398212
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's; First Edition edition (October 23, 2002)
Pages: 187 pages