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The Navies of Rome download epub

by Michael Pitassi


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The book look at Roman naval activity over many centuries, the span from before the Carthaginian Wars to the 450s is far longer than the era when Britannia ruled the waves.

Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). The book look at Roman naval activity over many centuries, the span from before the Carthaginian Wars to the 450s is far longer than the era when Britannia ruled the waves. There was also a kind of river navy.

The Navies of Rome book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Both welcome and useful ) This is a narrative history as we. . Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

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Both welcome and useful ) This is a narrative history as well as a focused study of the development of the ships, officers, and crews and the overall naval establishment. CHOICE This publication represents the first true examination of the Roman Navy as an independent arm of the military.

The Roman navy (Latin: Classis, lit. 'fleet') comprised the naval forces of the ancient Roman state. Throughout their history, the Romans remained a primarily land-based people and relied partially on their more nautically inclined subjects, such as the Greeks and the Egyptians, to build their ships.

The Roman Navy Ships, Men and Warfare 350 BC-AD 475 by Michael Paul Pitassi and Publisher Seaforth Publishing. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781473817753, 1473817757. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781848320901, 1848320906. Note that the availability of products for purchase is based on the country of your billing address. Some items may have regional restrictions for purchase. Canadian customers may purchase from our stores in Canada or the US. Canada.

The Roman Imperial Navy was the most powerful maritime force ever to have existed, prior to the European naval . And yet these warships, the very tools that allowed the Roman Navy to dominate the seas, have remained largely unstudied.

The Roman Imperial Navy was the most powerful maritime force ever to have existed, prior to the European naval development of relatively recent centuries. It was able to deploy huge fleets and dominate the seas around western Europe, north Africa, and the Middle East, as well as the great rivers that formed a large part of the eastern boundary of the Roman world. It secured the trade routes and maintained the communications that allowed the Roman Empire to exist.

Roman Warships, Michael Pitassi. The Roman navy operated hundreds if not thousands of warships over a period of nearly nine hundred years, but very little is known about those ships. The written sources mention plenty of types of warships, but without providing much extra information. Pitassi's approach to this problem is to start from the physical limitations of an oar-powered warship - the amount of space needed for each rower, the length and angle of the oars and the efficiency of different arrangements (generally speaking two men each with their own oar provide more power than two men on a single oar).

Pitassi has produced an admirable work on the Roman warship. This book is recommended for the students of ancient warfare, maritime history, and Roman culture.

Extremely valuable as a guide to approaching the reconstruction of part of the past. Pitassi has produced an admirable work on the Roman warship.

Both welcome and useful. (...) This is a narrative history as well as a focused study of the development of the ships, officers, and crews and the overall naval establishment. Recommended. CHOICE This publication represents the first true examination of the Roman Navy as an independent arm of the military. Though many may perceive the Roman Empire as a primarily land-based organisation, an empire forged by the formidable legions of infantry, the truth is that it was as much a maritime empire as that of the British in the nineteenth century, and in fact the Roman Navy was the most powerful maritime force ever to have existed. It secured the trade routes and maintained the communications that allowed the Roman Empire to exist; and it brought previously untouchable and unreachable enemies to battle and enabled the expansion of Imperial power into areas thought hitherto inaccessible. This book, featuring detailed reconstructions of the ships themselves, provides an engaging survey of the craft, their crewmen, and the navy's major contribution to the Empire's growth.

Comments: (6)

Tehn
I was in the process of editing my notes and drafts for a book I am writing on contract with Pen & Sword, provisionally titled Rome Rules the Waves, when I became aware of this book. I ordered a copy, worried that this would trump my project. My work is a kind of geo-strategic overview (how's that for a indigestible mouthful?) of Roman Sea Power at it's apogee, roughly 150 BC to AD 400. Being as the author of the subject title covers the entire span of Roman naval activity, and my own book is more of a precis of grand strategy in a naval context, I don't feel I've been outflanked. That said, this book provided a wealth of detail that has been hidden away in various erudite treatises on classical arcana. I had already completed most of my research when I purchased this book, but it does fill in some gaps on ship types, naval infrastructure and some minor naval engagements I had overlooked. I would highly recommend this book as a sequel to Chester Starr's 70+ year-old treatment.
It is an easy read and packs in a wealth of detail on everything you wanted to know about Roman naval history, but had no clue how to ask. My own book will be, as mentioned, what German military historians used to call "eine strategischer ueberblick". Mr. Pitassi's admirable work should be on the bookshelves alongside
the noted Starr book, and Thiel's two rare (and expensive) studies on the Punic Wars prequel and review, now over 60 years old.
Vaua
I have only just started this book.

I saw the book in Rome (totally different name) and decided to get the English version when I got home.

I have only just started, but really easy to read, and although full of facts does not read like the dreaded textbook.

The most interesting thing is the organization for the book.
Although chapter based, the whole book is in chronological order.
There are side bars on specific topics (like an annotated book).
The major difference in format from the Italian version is that the plates are grouped together as opposed to being spread throughout the book.

The drawn illustrations lack artistic merit, but oddly that does not annoy me as doesn't detract from the book, and are easy to comprehend.

I had a lot of books to read, but this jumped to front of list.
Umge
Written as a chronology of events for the development of the Roman Navy from foundation to eventual destruction (in the West), this is an ambitious book because so little attention is paid to the Navy both in the original source material and in scholarship. This book certainly does not replace the classic Chester G Starr "The Roman Imperial Navy" but it does cover a much larger time period, and is more tightly focussed on historical context (which other books often fail at providing). The book is nicely organized, the text is clearly written - this is a book written for a large audience. The main failings of the book are the dodgy layout, lack of distinction between authorial conjecture and reporting from other sources (which is why I gave it 4 stars), and a lack of technical detail (remedied to a large extent with his companion book, Roman Warships). That said, it's an important resource for a long-neglected area of Roman studies. If Pitassi continues in the vein of this and Roman Warships he will certainly become synonomous with Roman naval research.
Anayalore
There are few good books about the Roman Navy and this provides great summary background information for a novel about the Roman Army and Navy in the Asian provinces during the first century. The Navy during that time was a small part of the world-conquering Army. Usually ignored by Roman generals, it was allowed to function independently - thus offering many opportunities for characters to go off on their own adventures and only rearely cross paths with the Army. [...]
SoSok
I loved It.
felt boot
This is overall a rather good account of Roman naval power from before the Punic Wars through the 450s CE. There is some detail on administration, which some readers may find slow. There's detail on construction, force levels. The maps are not as good as I would expect, but the writing is quite good. The book details crewing, bases, the whole business of constructing, maintaining and using navies.

The central point is that Roman naval forces were not simply legions afloat, but specialized forces integral to conquest and the maintenance of empire, including policing sea lanes and repression of piracy. The wars with Carthage are the usual focus of Roman naval actions, and the scale was huge, many thousands of sailors and soldiers aboard thousands of vessels. A storm in 255 BCE wrecked a Roman fleet with as many as 100,000 drowned, the greatest known loss of life at sea in a single event. Pitassi maintains that the Romans out-sailored the Carthaginians, consistently beating them at sea.

The book look at Roman naval activity over many centuries, the span from before the Carthaginian Wars to the 450s is far longer than the era when Britannia ruled the waves. The best part of the book is probably the wars with Carthage, but Roman naval forces dominated the Mediterranean and Black Seas, and ventured into the Atlantic in the British provinces. There was also a kind of river navy.
The Navies of Rome download epub
Ancient Civilizations
Author: Michael Pitassi
ISBN: 1843836009
Category: History
Subcategory: Ancient Civilizations
Language: English
Publisher: Boydell Press; Reprint edition (June 23, 2014)
Pages: 384 pages