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by David C Douglas


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William the Conqueror. Douglas, David C. Published by University of California Press, 1964. Book Description Paperback. The book has been read but remains in clean condition.

William the Conqueror. A (Minneapolis, MN, . Here are our closest matches for William the Conqueror by Douglas, David . .Description: The dust jacket has minor chips and closed tears to the extremities. Bookseller Inventory 9011021. Bibliographic Details. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine.

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David Bates is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Glasgow and is regarded as a.Having read both David Douglas's William the Conqueror and this book by David Bates, I somewhat prefer Bates.

David Bates is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Glasgow and is regarded as a leading expert on William the Conqueror. His other books include Domesday Book, also published by Tempus. It is not for want of historical detail. Douglas is one of the most well-recognized scholars on Norman history and his book is filled with important details. However, I thought Bates's book is better written and is not lacking in critical details. Bates's biography of William is also more recent by 25 years.

In "William the Conquerer, " Professor Douglas analyzes the causes and the true character of the Norman impact upon England in the eleventh century

In "William the Conquerer, " Professor Douglas analyzes the causes and the true character of the Norman impact upon England in the eleventh century. Douglas' work on the Conqueror is superb, but be warned that this is not a modern, popular biography-it covers the facts of William's life and his invasion of England only. Douglas does not go into.

David Charles Douglas (1898–1982) was a historian of the Norman period at the University of Cambridge and University of Oxford. He joined Oxford University in 1963 as Ford's Lecturer in English History, and was the 1939 winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. William the Conqueror: The Norman Impact Upon England (May 1964). The Norman achievement, 1050-1100. The Norman fate, 1100-1154. English scholars, 1660-1730 (1939) winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize.

Find nearly any book by DAVID C. DOUGLAS. DAVID C. DOUGLAS (David C. Douglas). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. used books, rare books and new books. Find all books by 'DAVID C. DOUGLAS' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'DAVID C. DOUGLAS'. The Norman Conquest and British History (. urray Lecture). Wilhelm der Eroberer.

Douglas, David Charles, 1898-. Berkeley, University of California Press. William I, King of England, 1027 or 8-1087, Conquerors, Normans, Normans, Normandos en Inglaterra, Normandiërs, Culturele invloeden, Middeleeuwen. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

In "William the Conqueror", Professor Douglas analyzes the causes and the true character of the Norman impact upon England in the eleventh century. Paperback published 1992-07-01 by University of California Press. Alert if: New Price below. William I, usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke of Normandy from 1035 onward.


Comments: (7)

Shakagul
The 11th Century was a brutal and violent period, and William the Conquerer was a product of his time. He was called "a very wise man" by one contemporary, but he was also implacable and violent, and crushed anyone who opposed him. One man who made a joke about William had his eyes poked out on William's order. Villagers who laughed about William's illegitimate birth had their hands and feet cut off. William could be kind and gentle at times, but he was far better known for his cruelty. William's obituary stated that "in his time people had much oppression and very many injuries," and that he "loved greediness above all."

Edward the Confessor, King of England, had told William, who was Duke of Normandy in France, that William would be his successor to the English throne. When Harold took the throne after Edward's death, William led an army across the English Channel where he defeated (and killed) Harold at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. William then became King of England. He would spend the rest of his life bouncing back and forth from England to Normandy in an effort to protect his holdings. He was a brilliant military strategist and managed to hold onto all of his lands.

David Bates' biography gives the reader a good sense of William the Conquerer, which is saying something, since so few reliable sources exist. Bates examines them all and draws intelligent and insightful conclusions from them. Though the book was a trifle dry in places, it was a highly interesting read.
Foginn
William the Conqueror is perhaps one of the best known of the old ruling kings of England, yet oftentimes the lay person seems to only know that he conquered England and ruled Normandy, and perhaps that he was a bastard. William was so much more of a complex person and his important rule over Normandy and England had huge, far reaching implications.

William came in to his rule young and through force and will he was able to take a hold of his claim on Normandy and solidify his holdings. Bates does wonderfully in analyzing William's Normandy before he had any thoughts of invading England. You see a shrewd man who was a calculating general who continually thwarted his enemies in battle. His eventual invasion of England, as Bates showed, was a huge undertaking that also had luck on his side as Harold was off fighting another invasion in the north. The combination of his forces and Harold's depleted forces made for a decisive victory and a new King of England.

What I learned most from Bates was about William's personality. Bates shows how forceful he was in enforcing his rule by displacing the nobility with Normans loyal to him and thus changing the history of England irrevocably. Even more telling was how William handled the church. When the Pope tried to enforce his will in William's land he was absolutely unsuccessful since William took the stance that he had complete control over the church in his lands and dictated who was appointed the various bishoprics and so on. This was fascinating to me because, even though the church was still securing its power base, I had assumed that their foothold in Normandy and England was more secure. Not so with William. The nobility and the church yielded to his iron will.

Bates does wonderfully in showing the true character of William both pre-England as well as post-England. A recommend to those interested in William or this time period.

4 stars.
Lightbinder
Having read both David Douglas's William the Conqueror and this book by David Bates, I somewhat prefer Bates. It is not for want of historical detail. Douglas is one of the most well-recognized scholars on Norman history and his book is filled with important details. However, I thought Bates's book is better written and is not lacking in critical details. Bates's biography of William is also more recent by 25 years. Specifically, I preferred Bates for a couple reasons. One is that I gained a better sense of William as a person. William was somewhat like the Napoleon of his time, a superb military leader, a bold risk-taker who acted like he had something to prove, and uncompromising in his goals. Bates does a fine job of drawing out the dimensions of the man as duke and then as king, both his strengths and many weaknesses. The second reason is the use of extremely helpful drawings and plates in the book. For twenty consecutive pages Bates puts the Bayeux Tapestry along the top and bottom of each page and the narrative ties into what is happening on the tapestry. Following the flow of events displayed on the tapestry is an historical learning experience in itself. Except for one frame or two, I had never seen the entire tapestry laid out. It is a remarkable piece of history. It shows how at least one Norman in William's time, his half-brother, Odo, Bishop of Bayeaux, saw the events before, during, and after Hastings. After William arrested Odo later in his life, Odo may have had second thoughts about commissioning a tapestry to commemorate his brother's conquest. Second, the book has what might be viewed by some as a weakness but which I viewed as a strength. There was a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings in October, 2000. Bates uses 12 color plates from this event to display the armor, shields and weaponry used by William and Harold. Of course this is not the real thing but the color plates give a much clearer idea to the reader of what the participants at Hastings were wearing and the kinds of standards and shields used. I have nothing against the book by Douglas - it is a very good biography. But so is this book by Bates and I just found William and the times brought to life more in this biography. I recommend it.
William The Conqueror (University Paperbacks) download epub
Europe
Author: David C Douglas
ISBN: 0416299806
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Methuen/university Paperbacks; New Ed edition (1969)
Pages: 512 pages