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The French Encounter With Africans: White Response to Blacks, 1530-1880 download epub

by William B. Cohen


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In this pioneering work, William B. Cohen traces the ways in which negative attitudes toward blacks became deeply .

In this pioneering work, William B. Cohen traces the ways in which negative attitudes toward blacks became deeply embedded in French culture. Examining the forces that shaped these views, Cohen reveals the persistent inequality of French interactions with blacks in Africa, in the slave colonies of the West Indies, and in France itself. Now a classic, The French Encounter with Africans is essential reading for anyone engaged in current discussions of European relations with non-Europeans and with issues of racism, ethnicity, identity, colonialism, and empire. Be the first to ask a question about The French Encounter with Africans. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Examining the forces that shaped these vie "As French and American historians of France are revisiting the history of French racism today, William B. Cohen's book is more important than ever. It has become a classic.

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The first book, by Cohen, is the work of a mature scholar. It is a broad synthesis derived mostly from intellectual history that analyzes the French view of Blacks over a fty year period

The French Encounter with Africans: White Responses to Blacks (1530-1880). Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1980. Slavery and Reform in West Africa: Toward Emancipation in Nineteenth-Century Senegal and the Gold Coast. The first book, by Cohen, is the work of a mature scholar. It is a broad synthesis derived mostly from intellectual history that analyzes the French view of Blacks over a fty year period. The second book, by Getz, is his revised University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies doctoral thesis.

Encounter with Africans : White Response to Blacks, 1530-1880 .

The French Encounter with Africans : White Response to Blacks, 1530-1880. Foreword by James D. le Sueur. As French and American historians of France are revisiting the history of French racism today, William B. -Nancy L. Green In this pioneering work, William B.

Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 1980. The Journal of African History. Martin A. Klein (a1). University of Toronto. Your name Please enter your name. Who would you like to send this to?

William B. Cohen's sweeping study of French attitudes towards black Africans, first published in 1980 and newly reprinted in paperback, strives to dispel the mid-twentieth century myth that the French, unlike their American and European counterparts, historically rejected racism both a. .

William B. Cohen's sweeping study of French attitudes towards black Africans, first published in 1980 and newly reprinted in paperback, strives to dispel the mid-twentieth century myth that the French, unlike their American and European counterparts, historically rejected racism both at home and in their colonie. ONTINUE READING. The Allen Institute for AIProudly built by AI2 with the help of our.

Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965. Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965. Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe.

As French and American historians of France are revisiting the history of French racism today, William B. In this pioneering work, William B.

William Cohen created a film in writing when he charted the presence of Africans in the French culture and the colonial society in his book, The French Encounter with Africans: White Response to Blacks, 1530-1880. With his observant and analytical approach, Cohen formed a. With his observant and analytical approach, Cohen formed . ownload full paperFile format:. 5% of users find it useful. Level: Undergraduate. Pages: 5 (1250 words). Downloads: 0. Author: rjacobs.

"As French and American historians of France are revisiting the history of French racism today, William B. Cohen's book is more important than ever. It has become a classic." â?Nancy L. Green

In this pioneering work, William B. Cohen traces the ways in which negative attitudes toward blacks became deeply embedded in French culture. Examining the forces that shaped these views, Cohen reveals the persistent inequality of French interactions with blacks in Africa, in the slave colonies of the West Indies, and in France itself. Now a classic, The French Encounter with Africans is essential reading for anyone engaged in current discussions of European relations with non-Europeans and with issues of racism, ethnicity, identity, colonialism, and empire.


Comments: (4)

Syleazahad
Good book
Language quality:limpid
Lahorns Gods
In some ways this is a Francophone counterpart to works by Philip Curtin and Winthrop Jordan. Though not as innovative as their classics on Anglo-American racial thought, its appearance filled a major gap. Cohen's extensive archival research and close readings of famous and obscure texts is convincing in arguing that France, like other European colonial and slaving powers, was home to prejudicial ideas and practices. It includes nuanced analysis of complex thinkers like the Abbe Gregoire and Thomas Raynal, as well as legislative and ministerial debates. The tortured route to emancipation is a case in point. The First Republic abolished slavery (after Haiti struck a mighty blow against it); Napoleon I restored it; then the institution endured til 1848. Many believed in France's Mission Civilatrice, but it also provided a fig-leaf for overseas conquest and domestic discrimination. The tiny numbers of Africans accepted as citoyens is telling in itself. Later research (e.g. S. Peabody, "'There are No Slaves in France'") has modified some findings---confirming most others---but kudos to Cohen for showing France as unexceptional in racial attitudes.

NB, this is also a riposte to the 1-star assessment of the book from 2/3/13. Cf. my comments on that review.
Nargas
When William Cohen edited the French version of this book in 1981, The French press was really aggressive and bitter.

This book is a classic,because it destroys the French myth of "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity" , ( Liberté, égalité, Fraternité) between human beings.

The French scholars of the 18 and 19 th centuries are highly involved in the modern theory of "superior" and "inferior" races, with one central example : The count Gobineau.

We know that the ideas displayed in his book( in fact a summary of his french contempories fellow scholars) inspired some guys in Germany. We all know the dramatic result...

A French scholar ( canadian citizen), Pierre H Boulle wrote a book in 2007 : "Race et esclavage dans la France de l'Ancien Régime".

And this book confirms William B Cohen views on french racism 28 years ago.
Blackworm
This is not a book of history, but a settling of accounts by a disgruntled man, unhappy with French arrogance. William B. Cohen disputes the assertion that French racism was "different" from other Europeans racisms. His goal is understandable; it is even beneficial to the historical debate. But Pr Cohen goes further, much further: he distorts the facts, and he misleads the reader with a pile of quotations, exact quotations for sure, but out of context, truncated, and systematically biased. Here is one example among many.
The French Revolution abolished slavery. Does Pr Cohen credit its leaders for such a move? No, absolutely not. Here is what Pr Cohen has to say about this event:
"On February 4, 1794, the National Convention abolished slavery in all of France's colonies. Not the principles of humanity, but rather the practical exigencies of attempting to save the empire motivated the French National Convention to abolish slavery. Now the Blacks would rally to France against the British, and the example of French emancipation would undermine British authority in its own domain. As Danton exclaimed when the bill was passed, "Citizen, today England is dead! Pitt and his plots have been unravelled. The Englishman will see his commerce destroyed!" (Cf. page 117)
It is obvious that some revolutionaries had second thoughts while voting to abolish slavery and were pleased to play a trick on their enemy alien. But it is untrue and misleading to declare it was the only motivation of all the men who voted to abolish slavery. Even if we stick to Danton's case, here is what he really said on February 4:
"Representatives of the French people, heretofore we have decreed liberty only as egotists and for ourselves. But today we proclaim it in the face of the universe, and future generations will find their glory in this decree. We proclaimed universal liberty yesterday, when the President gave the fraternal kiss to the colored deputies. I saw the moment when the Convention ought to decree liberty to our brothers. The meeting was not large enough. The Convention has just done its duty. But after having granted the benefit of liberty, we must be, so to speak, the moderators of it. Let us send to the Committee of Public Safety and the Colonies, to combine the means of rendering this decree useful to humanity, without any danger to it.
We dishonored our glory by mutilating our works. The great principles developed by the virtuous Las Casas were misunderstood. We are working for future generations; let us send forth liberty into the colonies; to-day the English are dead. By casting liberty into the New World it will bring forth abundant fruit there; it will grow deep roots. Pitt and his accomplices will try in vain by political considerations to prevent the enjoyment of this benefit; they will be brought to nought. France will again assume the rank and influence which her energy, her soil, and her population assure her. We shall take pleasure in our generosity, but we shall not extend it beyond the limits of wisdom. We shall cut down tyrants as we have crushed faithless men who wished to keep back the Revolution. Let us not lose our energy, let us launch our frigates, let us be sure of the benedictions of the universe and of posterity, and let us decree the sending back of measures for the examination of the committee." (Translated by Helen B. Dole).
Is there geopolitics in this speech? Yes indeed! Is this speech only about geopolitics? Let the reader judge. And this is only Danton's opinion. The abolitionist movement in France was led by men such as Jacques-Pierre Brissot and Henry Gregoire who had devoted their entire lives to the abolition of slavery - however Pr Cohen has "demonstrated" earlier in his book that Gregoire was as well a bigot who despised blacks.
For unknown reasons, Pr Cohen intended to demonstrate that the French were racists, and have been racist even before they met any black man - and he goes back to Aristotle to show the depth of the anti-black prejudice in France. What he wrote could apply to all European peoples, and Pr Cohen admits it in a few instances (...on the whole one is struck by the similarities, rather than the differences, that marked white-black relations... the French view did not differ significantly from that of the Iberians or the English who came into contacts with Africans...). Such a rationale could have led to a real analysis of what are the specifics of French racism, but this is not what Pr Cohen intended to do. These allusions to a European background remain in an embryonic state, they are never developed, and they seem to be mentioned just as the historical equivalent of a disclaimer made by corporations in order to escape the effects of the torts of negligence towards readers.
Here is another example of Pr Cohen lack of seriousness. In a curious paragraph, he analyses the hidden symbolism of the French language. He makes a parallel between literature and the exploration of Africa in the mid-seventeenth century: "the negative image of blackness reached a climax in French literature, as a symbol for wickedness and treachery. Corneille spoke of "black actions", Racine of "black malice" and of crimes of "full blackness. Molière wrote of "black intentions" and "black character" when depicting personages as absolutely depraved and evil. Blacks were depicted as the ultimate symbol of evil: the devil."..." (Cf. p. 14-5).
This is Pr Cohen at "his best": first he quotes common expressions that are free of any racial connotations, do not prove anything and could be found in any language, and then he sneaks in an entirely different proposition: "Blacks were depicted as the ultimate symbol of evil: the devil." Reading quickly, the reader remains with the feeling that the Corneille, Racine and Molière have created black characters in their writings and depicted them negatively, which is not the case.
Despite an extensive knowledge of the sources, "The French Encounter with Africans" does not prove anything if not the depth of Pr Cohen's hatred towards the French.
The French Encounter With Africans: White Response to Blacks, 1530-1880 download epub
Europe
Author: William B. Cohen
ISBN: 0253349222
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Indiana Univ Pr; First Edition edition (May 1, 1980)
Pages: 382 pages