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The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World download epub

by Edward Dolnick


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Edward Dolnick’s smoothly written history of the scientific revolution tells the stories of the key players and events . In The Clockwork Universe,the result is a highly readable book about how our modern age came to be. He builds his case well

Edward Dolnick’s smoothly written history of the scientific revolution tells the stories of the key players and events that transformed society. He builds his case well. Here's one example: In the Middle Ages, the big question was "Why?", as in why does this happen - the earth's rotation, et. you name it.

New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick brings to light the true story of one of the most pivotal moments in modern intellectual history-when a group of strange, tormented geniuses invented science as we know it, and remade our understanding of the world.

New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick brings to light the true story of one of the most pivotal moments in modern intellectual history-when a group of strange, tormented geniuses invented science as we know it, and remade our understanding of the world

The Clockwork Universe book. No, not the inventor of the fig newton. Edward Dolnick has a breezy style, informative without feeling too formal, and the book is rich with fascinating detail.

The Clockwork Universe book. The root of the word disaster is explained, for example, and he lets us in on how many contemporary phrases, such as for whom the bell tolls originate in the 17th century. Dolnick has written on a diversity of subjects.

In The Clockwork Universe,the result is a highly readable book about how our modern age came to b.

In The Clockwork Universe,the result is a highly readable book about how our modern age came to be. The answer was generally theological in nature - God did it, therefore, and so on, end of argument. The author does a wonderful job bringing us to the 17th century and into the minds of the greatest scientists to ever have lived! Being a Christian, it was refreshing to discover the great faith of these men, and how their confidence that God was a mathematician drove them to find the keys of the natural world.

The Clockwork Universe Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World EDWARD DOLNICK For Lynn The universe is but a watch on a. .The men of the Royal Society were not the world’s first scientists.

The Clockwork Universe Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World EDWARD DOLNICK For Lynn The universe is but a watch on a larger scale. Titans like Descartes, Kepler, and Galileo, among many others, had done monumental work long before. But to a great extent those pioneering figures had been lone geniuses. With the rise of the Royal Society-and allowing for the colossal exception of Isaac Newton-the story of early science would have more to do with collaboration than with solitary contemplation.

Be grateful for whoever comes, because each has been sent as a guide from beyond. Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter. 276 Pages·2013·672 KB·102,671 Downloads·New!

Isaac Newton was born in the year that Galileo died. And if the reason why a stone falls to Earth is not the Earth’s position in the center of the universe, then just why does the stone fall?

Isaac Newton was born in the year that Galileo died. That was coincidence, but in hindsight it seemed to presage England’s rise to scientific preeminence and Italy’s long drift to mediocrity. What was not coincidence was that seventeenth-century England welcomed science, on the grounds that science supported religion, and thrived; and seventeenth-century Italy feared science, on the grounds that science undermined religion, and decayed. And if the reason why a stone falls to Earth is not the Earth’s position in the center of the universe, then just why does the stone fall?

Dolnick, Edward (2011) The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World, Harper Collins.

Dolnick, Edward (2011) The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World, Harper Collins. David Brewster (1850) "A Short Scheme of the True Religion", manuscript quoted in Memoirs of the Life, Writings and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton, cited in Dolnick, page 65. Webb, . ed. Knud Haakonssen (1996) "The Emergence of Rational Dissent. Enlightenment and Religion: Rational Dissent in Eighteenth-Century Britain, Cambridge University Press page 19. Westfall, Richard S. Science and Religion in Seventeenth-Century England.

The clockwork universe. Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World. Ann Finkbeiner is the author, most recently, of A Grand and Bold Thing: An Extraordinary New Map of the Universe Ushering In a New Era of Discovery. Continue reading the main story.

rakerman: The Clockwork Universe is to some extent a history of science . This little history begins Edward Dolnick’s Clockwork Universe, so the reader might think the book is about the Royal Society and its effects.

rakerman: The Clockwork Universe is to some extent a history of science ending with Newton as the key figure; The Universe Within also provides a history of science but starts with Newton and then moves on to quantum physicists. The book starts with an elaborate and deliberate framing of the 1660s, primarily in London. While this sets up for a discussion of the Royal Society (Newton et c. at that time, around halfway through, the book takes us to the 1400s to Copernicus to set up for the astronomy section.

From New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick, the true story of a pivotal moment in modern history when a group of strange, tormented geniuses—Isaac Newton chief among them—invented science and remade our understanding of the world.

At a time when the world was falling apart— in an age of religious wars, plague, and the Great Fire of London—a group of men looked around them and saw a world of perfect order. Chaotic as it looked, these earliest scientists declared, the universe was in fact an intricate and perfectly regulated clockwork. This was the tail-end of Shakespeare’s century, and these were brilliant, ambitious, confused, conflicted men. They believed in angels and alchemy and the devil, and they believed that the universe followed precise, mathematical laws. This is the story of the bewildered geniuses who made the modern world.


Comments: (7)

Taun
Why beat about the bush? I loved this book. I'm no scientist. I'm no mathematician. What I am is a historian and a novelist, which means I have a lively curiosity about a lot of things, the prerequisite for writing about anything. Edward Dolnick is a historian and his gig is the history of science. He also has that lively curiosity required of folks who think and put fingers to keyboards. For those of us of not scientifically gifted, we require someone, in this case Dolnick, to explain his subject. In this he excels. In The Clockwork Universe,the result is a highly readable book about how our modern age came to be. He builds his case well. Here's one example: In the Middle Ages, the big question was "Why?", as in why does this happen - the earth's rotation, etc., you name it. The answer was generally theological in nature - God did it, therefore, and so on, end of argument. As others, often risking church condemnation, took bold steps beyond, the question became "How?" This leap seems simple, but it is not. To his credit, Dolnick leads his readers along, and we make our own discoveries. I've given away many copies of this book to friends. I haven't quite started giving it away to random strangers yet, but it's good enough to be handed out on street corners. I learned a lot, and even more important, I thought a lot. Thank you, Edward Dolnick, for explaining unexplainable minds, like Sir Isaac Newton's, and Gottfried Leibniz's and others.
Ylal
The author does a wonderful job bringing us to the 17th century and into the minds of the greatest scientists to ever have lived!
Being a Christian, it was refreshing to discover the great faith of these men, and how their confidence that God was a mathematician drove them to find the keys of the natural world.
I commend the author, as it is clear he is not of the same persuasion about God as Newton and the others, yet still manages to present them in a fairly unbiased manner, though on occasion his disagreement did leak through. Probably the most disappointing argument he gave against the scientists of the 1600's view that God was a mathematician was as follows:

"The scientists of the 1600s felt that they had come to their view of God by way of argument and observation. But they were hardly a skeptical jury, and their argument, which seemed so compelling to its original audience, sounds like special pleading today. Galileo, Newton, Leibniz, and their peers leaped to the conclusion that God was a mathematician largely because they were mathematicians—the aspects of the world that intrigued them were those that could be captured in mathematics."

To me it seems very unjustified to accuse the fathers of "leaping" to the conclusion of God as a mathematician simply because they were mathematicians. To the contrary, an expert in a particular field would be the best person to recognize another expert in that field. A Bobby Fischer would most assuredly be able to discern if one were a grandmaster or not in the field of chess.
In like manner, the scientists saw God as a great mathematician because they saw the evidence of his great skills expressed in the universe, not because they were mathematicians.

This is an excellent book, and I do highly recommmed it for all interested in the history of these great scientists, and what life was like in the 1600s.
Kagda
This riveting and entertaining book tells the story of a group of odd but brilliant characters, most notably Isaac Newton, who essentially gave birth to the age of modern science. The author sets the scene in the mid seventeenth century England where superstitions, death and destruction dominate the day. The western world was still very much defined by mythical forces of good and evil.

For fifteen hundred years, since the classical Greeks discovered math and pondered form, purpose, symmetry and function, science was rather stagnant until the early sixteenth century when Copernicus posed that we’re not the center of our universe. A few decades later, Galileo discovered physics and established the rules for observational science.

In the seventeenth century, Newton and his contemporaries took Galileo’s ideas and built a whole new system of scientific method. New optical devices opened up whole worlds of observation in both the “heavens” and the microscopic. Newton’s calculus changed the way we understood motion, change and planetary movement, which lead to his masterpiece The Principia and his famous scientific laws.

The author portrays the competitiveness of these geniuses who both shared and sheltered their discoveries and data. Rivalry fueled much of the big breakthroughs in the period and the author does a good job describing the lively relationships. But the giant of the period was by far Newton and everyone knew it at the time. He was an extraordinary thinker who brought insight about much of the workings of the natural universe.

Overall, a truly terrific book!
SupperDom
I purchased this book in December of 2015 but didn't start it until this week. Boy, have I been kicking myself! This was an excellent book, entertaining from start to finish, with amazing insight into what took place in the 17th century. If you at all enjoyed either Carl Sagan's Cosmos, or the Neil DeGrasse Tyson television production of the same name, you will absolutely love this book. I don't want to be too effusive, but this book made me excited about the beginnings of the scientific revolution as David McCullough's 1776 made me feel about the American Revolution. I highly recommend this book!!!
The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World download epub
Europe
Author: Edward Dolnick
ISBN: 0061719528
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (February 7, 2012)
Pages: 416 pages