» » The Hittites: And Their Contemporaries in Asia Minor (Ancient Peoples and Places)

The Hittites: And Their Contemporaries in Asia Minor (Ancient Peoples and Places) download epub

by J.G. Macqueen


Epub Book: 1625 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1588 kb.

This book is an academic text that pieces together the facts about the Hittites from their translated clay tablets and . The book is a fine introduction to origins and development of late Bronze age cultures in Asia Minor.

This book is an academic text that pieces together the facts about the Hittites from their translated clay tablets and archeological finds, and gives the reader a modern appreciation for these ancient civilization builders. No stone is left unturned, how they arranged their families, worshiped their gods, fought their wars, and secured the critical tin for the making of bronze is carefully described. It describes the role of the Hittites in world history especially relative to the Assyrian and Egyptian empires. It clarifies Troy as linguistically Greecian.

Macqueen, J. G. (James . Publication date. New York, NY : Thames and Hudson. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

The Hittites were an Indo-European speaking people who established a kingdom .

The Hittites were an Indo-European speaking people who established a kingdom in Anatolia (modern Turkey) almost 4,000 years ag. It has been revised and enlarged in The Hittites: And Their Contemporaries in Asia Minor.

This study investigates the origins of the Hittites, the sources of the metals that were so vital to their success and their relationship with contemporaries in the Aegean world, the Trojans and the Mycenaean Greeks.

Ancient Peoples and Places Series). This study investigates the origins of the Hittites, the sources of the metals that were so vital to their success and their relationship with contemporaries in the Aegean world, the Trojans and the Mycenaean Greeks.

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Volume 39 Issue 3. J. Macqueen

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Macqueen: English Français. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Macqueen: The Hittites and their contemporaries in Asia Minor. Ancient Peoples and Places, Vol. 8. 206 pp. : Thames and Hudson, 1975.

and their Contemporaries in Asia Minor. A complete history of the Hittites, an Ancient Anatolian people who established an empire in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. Previous The Complete Tutankhamun. Next Dictionary of Celtic Myth and Legend.

Lost Worlds: Persia's Forgotten Empire (Ancient History Documentary) Timeline - Продолжительность: 49:24 Timeline - World History Documentaries Recommended for you. 49:24. LIVE: KTN NEWS Live Stream KCSE 2019 RESULTS KTN News Kenya 3 053 зрителя.

The Hittites were an ng people who established a kingdom in Anatolia (modern Turkey) almost 4,000 years ago. They rose to become one of the great powers of the ancient Middle Eastern world by conquering Babylon - and were destroyed in the wake of the movements of the enigmatic Sea Peoples around 1180 BC. This study investigates such intriguing topics as the origins of the Hittites, the sources of the metals which were so vital to their success, and their relations with their contemporaries in the Aegean world, the Trojans and the Mycenaean Greeks.

The Hittites and Their Contemporaries in Asia Minor. Westview Press (05 January 1975). Hittites: And Their Contemporaries in Asia Minor. Thames & Hudson (01 September 1986). lt;< First < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next Last . Society of Biblical Literature (05 January 1999). Recommended By. Numerous educational institutions recommend us, including Oxford University, Michigan State University, and University of Minnesota. We have also been recommended for educational use by the following publications


Comments: (3)

Nern
This book is rather outdated unfortunately. Hittite studies were only invented in the beginning of the last century so a difference of only a few years can matter a lot. This book is over thirty years old. They're still translating texts after all, and piecing together bits of data to make them fit. Even at the time I doubt it was especially good even as an introduction. At that time Gurney's book was the best available on the subject and it had been written in the '50s. This book is under 200 pages and is very basic. The data on archaeological excavations is quite good but again, it's limited. This book was written as part of a series which means that the author is not an expert in the field and isn't as familiar with the material as someone who devoted serious study to it. The best feature is the copious illustrations which alone prevent me from giving it Two Stars. Even if you have better books on the Hittites I'd recommend this one for the pics. Speaking of better books I'd recommend the one I mentioned above or better yet Trevor Bryce's The Kingdom of the Hittites and Life and Society in the Hittite World.
Gelgen
Before heading to Turkey, I wanted to beef up on the histories of this wonderful geographical area. The Hittites covered much of the area, although it is hard to go into great depth due to how ancient the nation was. This writer did a wonderful job and I learned a great deal. The time spent reading was worth it.
Orevise
This review is for the original edition of THE HITTITES, published in 1975. It has been revised and enlarged in this edition.

While it may seem obvious to suggest to anyone who is interested in the culture of the Hittites or of ancient Anatolia that they should look for the most up-to-date edition, I think it really depends on the reader's previous knowledge of the Hittite empire, and what it is they are looking to get out of their research. In other words, I have a hard time believing that, as a casual reader, I missed out on anything critical by reading this earlier version. If I had had a choice between picking up this older version and the newer, I would have gone for the newer, but I found this for sale at a library discard sale for pocket change. With those parameters in place, I was reasonably satisfied; and a cursory search on the internet did not reveal anything that contradicted the substance of what was contained in this earlier edition.

Although this book is part of a series, as a previous reviewer mentioned, the author for this particular installment, J. G. MacQueen, was a former Scholar of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara, Turkey, and has done field survey-work and excavated in Turkey (according to information about the author), so it seems inaccurate to me to characterize him as someone who is "not an expert in the field and isn't as familiar with the material as someone who devoted serious study to it." There may well be better books on the subject by different authors, but Mr. MacQueen's qualifications--and his handling of the material--in no way suggested to me he was unqualified to write the book.

Records from the Hittite civiliation are scarce--much of what is known about them is reconstructed from the archeological evidence; and as the author states in his preface, any book about them is going to be a work in progress, as new evidence is continually being uncovered. Be that as it may, the Hittites flourished in what is now Central and Western Turkey and Northern Syria from around 1600 to 1180 B.C.E., and the book covers the background of the area and environment in which the culture arose; speculates on where the Hittites originally came from; and details their history, daily life, religious customs, method of warfare, and art and literature. There are a wide variety of illustrations throughout the text, and 34 pages of black-and-white photographs at the back. Marginal notes refer to which photographic plate is indicated by the text, so the reader can easily flip to the back and see amplification of the author's meaning, which is helpful, as several plates illustrate more than one point.

While presented as an introduction to the Hittite Empire, the author's manner suggested it was written for an audience that, while not so well-informed about the Hittites per se, has a better than average grasp on the terms and descriptions of Bronze Age cultures in general. For instance, though I could gather from context that the terms referred to specific dates and were probably associated with uncovered strata from archeological digs, I had no previous knowledge of terms like EB I, EB II, Troy IV, etc. They do in fact represent dates (EB for Early Bronze age), but I don't think the author clarifies many similar concepts and phrases well enough for lay readers. Conversely, I thought the author went into too much detail when describing the layout of cities and housing and the temples of the Hittites. My impression, which dovetails with the description of the author's experience, is that this book was written primarily from an archeological perspective, and those readers who find that viewpoint intriguing are likely to gain a great deal of information. Readers who are more interested in a narrative approach, like me, may feel as though the book is hit-and-miss.

If there were no new edition to this book, I would probably have rated this edition four stars rather than three. While I did have some quibbles with it, it was still an interesting introduction to a culture I knew little about. As I said before, I would suggest picking up the revised and enlarged edition if you had a choice between the two, though I felt well-served by this older copy. Based on this installment, I will probably now look for other volumes in this series (Ancient Peoples and Places), of which THE HITTITES was number eighty-three.
The Hittites: And Their Contemporaries in Asia Minor (Ancient Peoples and Places) download epub
Middle East
Author: J.G. Macqueen
ISBN: 0500020817
Category: History
Subcategory: Middle East
Language: English
Publisher: Thames & Hudson Ltd; First American Edition edition (November 17, 1975)
Pages: 206 pages