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The Bitter Road to Freedom: The Human Cost of Allied Victory in World War II Europe download epub

by William I Hitchcock


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The American People in World War II: Freedom from Fear, Part Two (Oxford History of the Unite. y David M. Kennedy Paperback . World War 2 continues to fascinate me and the last twelve months of the war particularly so. This book is a great addition to the discussion and debate.

World War 2 continues to fascinate me and the last twelve months of the war particularly so.

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William I. Hitchcock. UNRRAThe results of UNRRA’s work in Greece were mixed

William I. UNRRAThe results of UNRRA’s work in Greece were mixed. Greek people and the na- tion were quite literally kept alive by the contribution of UNRRA supplies and by the hard, practical work of hundreds of UNRRA employees without whom the sup- plies would never have reached the Greek people. 27 By the end of 1945, the organization had shipped 5,000 tons of clothing, shoes, and blankets into the country, opened welfare.

In this brilliant new book, historian William I. Hitchcock surveys the European continent from D-Day . This book recounts a surprising story, often jarring and uncomfortable, and one that has never been told with such richness and depth. Hitchcock surveys the European continent from D-Day to the final battles of the war and the first few months of the peace. Hitchcock gives voice to those who were on the receiving end of liberation, moving them from the edge of the story to the center.

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Электронная книга "The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe", William I Hitchcock. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте.

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Hitchcock’s most recent book, The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe (Free Press, 2009), explores the civilian experience of liberation in Europe at the close of World War II. It was a Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and won the 2009 George Louis Beer Prize. It was a Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and won the 2009 George Louis Beer Prize from the American Historical Association. He is presently working on a collection of essays, with Petra Goedde, on the international history of human rights

A good book-in this case William Hitchcock's The Bitter Road to Freedom-can make us think of. .It tackles the part of the war that has received relatively little attention up to now: the liberation of Europe in the last year of the war and beyond

A good book-in this case William Hitchcock's The Bitter Road to Freedom-can make us think of the "good war" in new and disturbing ways. It tackles the part of the war that has received relatively little attention up to now: the liberation of Europe in the last year of the war and beyond.

book by William I. For many years, we have celebrated the courage of Allied soldiers, sailors, and aircrews who defeated Hitler's regime and restored freedom to the continent.

Author : Mr William I Hitchcock. Publisher : The Free Press. Users who liked this book, also liked. Pompeii: The Life of a Roman Town (English). Necropolis: London and Its Dead (English). A People's History of the World: From the Stone Age to the New Millennium (English). Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee (English). The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World (English).

American s are justly proud of th e role their country played in liberating Europe from Nazi tyranny. For many years, we have celebrated the courage of Allied soldiers, sailors, and aircrews who defeated Hitler's regime and restored freedom to the continent. But in recounting the heroism of the "greatest generation," Americans often overlook the wartime experiences of European people themselves -- the very people for whom the war was fought. In this brilliant new book, historian William I. Hitchcock surveys the European continent from D-Day to the final battles of the war and the first few months of the peace. Based on exhaustive research in five nations and dozens of archives, Hitchcock's groundbreaking account shows that the liberation of Europe was both a military triumph and a human tragedy of epic proportions. Hitchcock gives voice to those who were on the receiving end of liberation, moving them from the edge of the story to the center. From France to Poland to Germany, from concentration-camp internees to refugees, farmers to shopkeepers, husbands and wives to children, the experience of liberation was often difficult and dangerous. Their gratitude was mixed with guilt or resentment. Their lives were difficult to reassemble. This strikingly original, multinational history of liberation brings to light the interactions of soldiers and civilians, the experiences of noncombatants, and the trauma of displacement and loss amid unprecedented destruction. This book recounts a surprising story, often jarring and uncomfortable, and one that has never been told with such richness and depth. Ranging from the ferocious battle for Normandy (where as many French civilians died on D-Day as U.S. servicemen) to the plains of Poland, from the icy ravines of the Ardennes to the shattered cities and refugee camps of occupied Germany, The Bitter Road to Freedom depicts in searing detail the shocking price that Europeans paid for their freedom. Today, with American soldiers once again waging wars of liberation in faraway lands, this book serves as a timely and sharp reminder of the terrible human toll exacted by even the most righteous of wars.

Comments: (7)

Kekinos
This is a very well written history of the period immediately following the end of WWII in Europe. Unlike some scholarly efforts which focus on the politics and leaders of this period, this book gives an “on the ground” perspective of what it was like to have lived through what many may assume was a quick return to peace and prosperity.

Mr. Hitchcock balances facts and numbers with individual recollections and perceptions and in so doing gives us both an emotional and logical understanding of this period. The writing is objective: credit and blame for success and failure are noted for both victors and vanquished. While popular history makes this period appear to be the conclusion of the good fight, he points out that it was much more complex period with many conflicts that were not quickly, if at all, resolved.

I heartily recommend this book for the casual history reader who would like an introduction to this unreported period in Europe. It’ll give you a better appreciation of what it means to bring war to an end and, I believe, will help you better understand the challenges of ending current US involved wars.
Flamekiller
I could not read this book all at once. I had to put it down and come back to it again and again. As some reviewers note Mr. Hitchcock does not cover all nationalities who suffered through the liberation of Europe. However, he is very thorough in covering those he writes about.

There was little heroic and much tragedy in the end of the war's effects on civilians and those liberated from the grip of Nazi tyranny. And there was more pain caused by the way the DPs were dealt with after the war.

This is a story of WWII that is largely unknown and should be part of the well read persons experience. Just don't expect a fast easy read.
Coirad
The title references the fact that the liberation of Europe was violent process. Violence between soldiers, violence inflicted upon civilian populations, and violence on industry and the landscape. The author strips away great hunks of the propaganda that has often accompanied the history of D-Day through to the fall of Germany, rightfully and accurately so. The "greatest generation" is revealed in the book to be not entirely gracious as drunkenness, desertion, looting and sexual assault was virtually commonplace but regarded as a cost of war.

I really enjoyed the first section of the book which examines the western front with more critical analysis of how the war was waged than most books covering the period. Of course, in hindsight it is easy to be critical but the content provides more context for decision-making both good and bad. The conditions braved by soldier and citizen alike on the western and eastern fronts give great pause - their trials and tribulations are incredible. The numbers of deaths suffered by the Soviet Union are staggering - perhaps 26 million - these losses were 65 times greater than American statistics.

As a Canadian, I appreciate the attention given to my country's contribution and the recognition that they fought hard and well. World War 2 continues to fascinate me and the last twelve months of the war particularly so. This book is a great addition to the discussion and debate.
Nuadabandis
Indeed, this is a bitter book to read. It is not an emphasis on European battles and allied soldiers, but on the civilians whose deaths from bombs, murder, mistreatment and starvation out numbered the deaths of those soldiers--on both sides--who fought in the war.

The author's writing style is engaging in the first third of the book, sufferable in the middle (he drones on with repetitive detail) and the latter third approaches absorbing. I suppose much of the information needs to be compiled "for the record," but he could have gotten his point across with a book half the size. And what is his point? See the preceding paragraph.

Nearly the whole latter half of the book deals with the pre- to post-war physical, social and political treatment of the Jews by their own mother countries, the Nazis, and the allies after the war (in Germany).

As stated, this is a history not so much of the war, but of the liberation and aftermath. We see how the American and British armies, especially, were both the saviour of the Jews and the reluctant hosts of this devastated, homeless, stateless mass. This is a book--in the latter third--about how both the displaced Jews and the allied armies viewed the liberation. Their views did not always--even often--coincide.
The Bitter Road to Freedom: The Human Cost of Allied Victory in World War II Europe download epub
Military
Author: William I Hitchcock
ISBN: 1439123306
Category: History
Subcategory: Military
Language: English
Publisher: Free Press (October 13, 2009)
Pages: 464 pages