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Religion and Public Life in the Mountain West: Sacred Landscapes in Transition (Religion by Region) download epub

by Jan Shipps,Mark Silk,Walter Nugent,Ferenc Morton Szasz,Kathleen Flake,Randi Jones Walker,Philip A. Deloria


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Religion and Public Life. has been added to your Cart. This book, the second in a series of nine reports on religion in various regions of the United States, explores contemporary religious life in Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Idaho, Colorado, Montana and Wyoming. Although the region still features a spread-out population (22 people per square mile, compared to the national average of 80), it has the fastest-growing population of the nation. A chapter on demographics by Walter Nugent describing the Mountain West as an oasis culture is complemented by Ferenc Szasz's essay on the role of religion in creating a social infrastructure in the region.

The sacred groves in the mountains of Epirus in NW Greece have been established during the Ottoman period and consist of locally adapted systems set apart from the surrounding intensively managed, anthropogenic landscape. eight sacred groves and compared them with nearby control (managed) forests.

Huge mountain ranges and vast uninhabited areas characterize the Mountain West. The region is home to several dense urban centers, but there is enough space between cities for three very distinct religious cultures to develop

Huge mountain ranges and vast uninhabited areas characterize the Mountain West. The region is home to several dense urban centers, but there is enough space between cities for three very distinct religious cultures to develop. Arizona and New Mexico's religious public life is still dominated by the Catholic church which was in place three centuries before these areas becam Huge mountain ranges and vast uninhabited areas characterize the Mountain West

Huge mountain ranges and vast uninhabited areas characterize the . Colorado Wyoming and Montana 115. Sacred Landscapes in Transition 139. BIBLIOGRAPHY 151. White Evangelicals. This book, the second in a series of nine reports on religion in various regions of the United States, explores contemporary religious life in Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Idaho, Colorado, Montana and.

Sacred Landscapes in Transition (Religion by Region).

Shipps Jan. Religion and Public Life in the Mountain West. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Religion and Public Life in the Mountain West from your list? Religion and Public Life in the Mountain West. Sacred Landscapes in Transition (Religion by Region). by Shipps Jan. Published September 15, 2004 by AltaMira Press.

Other books in this series. 1 Demography 3 Overview: Religion and Southern Public Life 4 The Evangelical Belt 5 African American Religion and Southern Public Life 6 Religious Minorities Living in the Evangelical Belt 7 Southern Civil Religions 8 From Church Women's Clubs to Office Holding 9 Religion and Regions within the South: Appalachia and Peninsular Florida) show more. Summing up: Recommended. Academic programs, particularly in Protestant studies; upper-level undergraduates and above.

Historian Jan Shipps addresses a meeting of the John Whitmer Historical Association. Religion and Public Life in the Mountain West: Sacred Landscapes in Transition (Religion by Region Series, #2). Jo Ann Barnett "Jan" Shipps (born 1929) is an American historian specializing in Mormon History, particularly in the latter half of the 20th century to the present. Recently, The University of Illinois Press published her book Sojourner in the Promised Land: Forty Years Among the Mormons, in which she interweaves her own history of Mormon-watching with 16 essays on Mormon history and culture. YouTube Encyclopedic. Religion and Public Life in the Mountain West: Sacred Landscapes in Transition (Religion by Region Series, 2004.

Religion and Nothingness (Japanese: Shūkyō to wa Nanika; the original title translates literally as "What is Religion?") is a 1961 book by the Japanese philosopher Keiji Nishitani, in which the author discusses nihilism. The appearance of the English translation increased interest in Nishitani's ideas among philosophers.

Mark Silk is associate professor of religion in public life and founding director of the Leonard E. Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Библиографические данные. Religion and Public Life in the Pacific Region: Fluid Identities G - Reference, Information and Interdisciplinary Subjects Series Religion by region.

Huge mountain ranges and vast uninhabited areas characterize the Mountain West. The region is home to several dense urban centers, but there is enough space between cities for three very distinct religious cultures to develop. Arizona and New Mexico's religious public life is still dominated by the Catholic church which was in place three centuries before these areas became U.S. states. Mormons came to Utah and Idaho in the 19th century to set up their own church-state and only later were admitted to the Union. Religious minorities from Native Americans to "mainstream" Protestants must contend with these religious establishments. In the third subregion of Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana no one religious body dominates and many inhabitants claim no religious affiliation at all. Religion and Public Life in the Mountain West explores these three distinct religious regions but then goes on to see how they work together and what they have in common.
Religion and Public Life in the Mountain West: Sacred Landscapes in Transition (Religion by Region) download epub
World
Author: Jan Shipps,Mark Silk,Walter Nugent,Ferenc Morton Szasz,Kathleen Flake,Randi Jones Walker,Philip A. Deloria
ISBN: 0759106274
Category: History
Subcategory: World
Language: English
Publisher: AltaMira Press (May 19, 2004)
Pages: 176 pages