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Podium, the Pulpit, and the Republicans, The: How Presidential Candidates Use Religious Language in American Political Debate download epub

by Frederick Stecker


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Home Browse Books Book details, The Podium, the Pulpit, and the Republicans: How. By Frederick Stecker. Communication in Politics-United States. 7 - Issues of Security- The 2004 Presidential and Vice Presidential Debates 84. 8 - Religion and Induced Fear- The Stealth Manipulation of the American Public 102. 9 - The Residual Effects of the 2004 Presidential Contest 116.

2008: The Democratic and Republican National Conventions and the Prelude to the Presidential Debates

2008: The Democratic and Republican National Conventions and the Prelude to the Presidential Debates. 143. The 2008 Presidential Debates and the Presidential Election. Stecker does a superb job of pulling these disparate vectors of today’s political culture together. The Podium, the Pulpit, and the Republicans is also daring in that it focuses on the crisis of American politics as represented by the strains and tensions (as well as successes) of the Republican Party.

Stecker's book traces the development of the Republican rhetoric of polarization and applies the linguistics-based political typology of George Lakoff to an analysis of the presidential debates of 2000, 2004, and 2008.

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book by Frederick Stecker.

George W. Bush Is Back in the Rangers Front Row - NYTimes.

by Frederick Stecker. In this book, the presidential debates of 2000, 2004, and 2008 are analyzed in terms of linguistics, rhetoric, and religious context to offer a unique perspective on the styles, beliefs, and strategies of the two major parties and their candidates.

The Presidential candidates campaign throughout the country to win the . During the general election General Election: a final election for a political office with a limited list of candidates.

The Presidential candidates campaign throughout the country to win the support of the general population. On election day, people in every state cast their vote. Step 3: The Electoral College In general, primaries use secret ballots for voting. Americans go to their polling place Polling Place: the location in which you cast your vote. to cast their vote for president.

H. Frederick Sweitzer, Mary A. King.

In this book, the presidential debates of 2000, 2004, and 2008 are analyzed in terms of linguistics, rhetoric, and religious context to offer a unique perspective on the styles, beliefs, and strategies of the two major parties and their candidates.


Comments: (7)

Duzshura
For anyone trying to understand how Beltway strategists have successfully hijacked Christianity for political gain, this book is an absolute must-read. Frederick Stecker has analyzed the religious rhetoric of the American presidency from the Reagan years to the 9/11 era and beyond through a number of different lenses -- historical, psychological, and linguistic. The end result is an illuminating and insightful profile of how a relatively small number of clerics, civic leaders, and marketers have come to co-opt Christianity as a powerful form of political propaganda. Even more disturbingly, this book also draws from contemporary models of cognitive psychology to explain why the metaphors of religious nationalism can exert such a hold on the psyche of so many citizens. But for all of its volatile content, The Podium, the Pulpit, and the Republicans stays refreshingly clear of an anti-religious and/or partisan agenda. On the contrary, the author -- a scholar of psychology and an Episcopalian minister -- has simply brought to light the unstated assumptions of America's modern-day Christian nationalism for readers to understand and evaluate on their own terms. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in American religion, the presidency, and/or media studies - not to mention to anyone who cares about our country's political culture, today or in the future.
Mbon
An old friend has written an astute book about political language. He is Frederick R. Stecker, an Episcopal Priest, retired from the parish ministry and now an adjunct professor at Colby Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire. Fr. Stecker also holds a doctorate from the Institute for the Study of Violence of the Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis. For his dissertation, as he explains in his introduction, he "studied the heavily rehearsed language of the presidential debates of 2000 and 2004," from a perspective informed by George Lakoff's work on political language in Moral Politics (1996) and by other work in the literature relating to ways we humans process fear and rage, form world views, develop identity and group identification, etc.1 The present book appears to have expanded and enlarged the work of the dissertation to include, among other things, an analysis of the language of the 2008 presidential campaign.

Fr. Stecker's book is both incisive and informed. It avoids the clichés of contemporary media discourse while speaking directly to the categories that enframe those clichés. Particularly cogent in displaying how certain religious tropes resonate with various groups of voters, Fr. Stecker's documentation is impressive, presented informally in the text. Like Lakoff, Fr. Stecker could be charged with speaking as a liberal, but that doesn't trouble me; and I think the quantitative evidence in this qualitative study is forceful.

That's not what I want to talk about, however. Fr. Stecker traces the rise of the religious right in post-1960s American politics in his second and third chapters and links that history both with the economic interests it serves and with its growth as a counter-culture. Central to his primary argument in the chapters that follow is an analysis of how George W. Bush and Richard Cheney (perhaps under the tutelage of Karl Rove) combined use of religious language identifying themselves with the supposed certainties of "faith" and skillful manipulation of the fear of terrorism to foster and maintain a siege mentality in the public mind during the years following 9/11 until support for the Iraq war began to erode.

A chief finding of Fr. Stecker's research is that these rhetorical gestures and the gestures they provoked from Democratic candidates were successful for Republicans in 2000 and 2004 and validate Lakoff's "nation as family" metaphors; but a further finding is that Barack Obama was able to turn the Republicans' rhetoric against them and reclaim both the language of faith and the language of patriotism for his own campaign and best "the Republicans at their own game" in 2008. It is this latter finding for which I am particularly grateful.

A fuller version of this review may be found on my blog.
Brariel
Assuming one believes that God created human beings in His/Her own image, it would stand to reason that God would want human beings to make full use of their capabilities --among them eyes, ears, brain, heart, and gut -- to make sense of the world and their place in it. Frederick Stecker's book is the result of the author's use of his eyes, ears, brain, heart, and gut, with the intent of setting his readers free from the cheap comforts of false idols promoted by politicians. You will read and hear political speeches differently after having read this book.
Gozragore
There is so much rich information that I only knew tangentially and it really provides a very (scary) detailed look at how things have been manipulated/presented/used. I feel so much more informed. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!
Castiel
Today's news illustrates what Rick Stecker writes about in this excellent book--opponent's supporters calling Romney's Mormon religion a "cult." It's an informative read, especially right now.
Yozshujind
The book is very interesting and slightly provocative. I am enjoying it. It arrived within the time frame given by the web site.
Podium, the Pulpit, and the Republicans, The: How Presidential Candidates Use Religious Language in American Political Debate download epub
World
Author: Frederick Stecker
ISBN: 0313382506
Category: History
Subcategory: World
Language: English
Publisher: Praeger (July 22, 2011)
Pages: 229 pages