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Do Museums Still Need Objects? (The Arts and Intellectual Life in Modern America) download epub

by Steven Conn


Epub Book: 1693 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1859 kb.

The Arts and Intellectual Life in Modern America 2009 272 pages 6 x 9 34 illus.

The Arts and Intellectual Life in Modern America 2009 272 pages 6 x 9 34 illus. 50 World Rights American History, Cultural Studies Short copy: In this broadly conceived study Steven Conn examines the development of American museums across the twentieth.

Steven Conn offers a refreshing look at museums and many of the debates surrounding their development and practices over the past forty years. He is right to frame his inquiry by asking if museums still need objects. Too often these debates have ignored the very characteristic that defines museums and distinguishes them from all other cultural institutions: they collect, preserve, and present things. This is an important, timely book. -James Cuno, President and Director, Art Institute of Chicago.

Author: Steven Conn ISBN 10: 0812221559. Title: Do Museums Still Need Objects?. Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press ISBN 13: 9780812221558. Will be clean, not soiled or stained. Conn ranges across a wide variety of museum types from art and anthropology to science and commercial museums asking questions about the relationship between museums and knowledge, about the connection between culture and politics, about the role of museums in representing non-Western societies, and about public institutions and the changing nature of their constituencies.

We live in a museum age," writes Steven Conn in Do Museums Still Need Objects? And indeed, at the turn of the twenty-first century, more people are visiting museums than ever before. By closely observing the cultural, intellectual, and political roles that museums play in contemporary society, while also delving deeply into their institutional histories, historian Steven Conn demonstrates that museums are no longer seen simply as houses for collections of objects.

Series:The Arts and Intellectual Life in Modern America. The easy erudition and wit of Do Museums Still Need Objects?

Series:The Arts and Intellectual Life in Modern America. University of pennsylvania press. In this provocative and engaging book, Steven Conn considers the continuing role museums play in contemporary American society. Despite recent shifts in their priorities, Conn argues that museums and their collections possess tremendous potential as sites of learning and places where civic identity is shaped and sustained. The easy erudition and wit of Do Museums Still Need Objects?

We live in a museum age," writes Steven Conn in Do Museums Still Need Objects? And indeed, at the turn of the twenty-first century, more people are visiting museums than ever before Lire la suite.

Ebook written by Steven Conn . Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Do Museums Still Need Objects?.

We live in a museum age," writes Steven Conn in Do Museums Still Need Objects? And indeed, at the turn of the twenty-first century, more people are visiting museums than ever before

We live in a museum age," writes Steven Conn in Do Museums Still Need Objects? And indeed, at the turn of the twenty-first century, more people are visiting museums than ever before.

We live in a museum age," writes Steven Conn in Do Museums Still Need Objects? . By closely observing the cultural, intellectual, and political roles that museums play in contemporary society, while also delving deeply into their institutional histories, historian Steven Conn demonstrates that museums are no longer seen simply as houses for collections of objects

47 Conn, Museums, 262. 48 See nn. 33-34 above.

47 Conn, Museums, 262. on the long afterlife of Quatremére's critique, see Daniel J. Sherman, "Quatremère/Benjamin/Marx: Art Museums, Aura, and Commodity Fetishism," in Museum/Culture, 123-43. 50 G. W. F. Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, trans.

"We live in a museum age," writes Steven Conn in Do Museums Still Need Objects? And indeed, at the turn of the twenty-first century, more people are visiting museums than ever before. There are now over 17,500 accredited museums in the United States, averaging approximately 865 million visits a year, more than two million visits a day. New museums have proliferated across the cultural landscape even as older ones have undergone transformational additions: from the Museum of Modern Art and the Morgan in New York to the High in Atlanta and the Getty in Los Angeles. If the golden age of museum-building came a century ago, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural History, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Field Museum of Natural History, and others were created, then it is fair to say that in the last generation we have witnessed a second golden age.

By closely observing the cultural, intellectual, and political roles that museums play in contemporary society, while also delving deeply into their institutional histories, historian Steven Conn demonstrates that museums are no longer seen simply as houses for collections of objects. Conn ranges across a wide variety of museum types—from art and anthropology to science and commercial museums—asking questions about the relationship between museums and knowledge, about the connection between culture and politics, about the role of museums in representing non-Western societies, and about public institutions and the changing nature of their constituencies. Elegantly written and deeply researched, Do Museums Still Need Objects? is essential reading for historians, museum professionals, and those who love to visit museums.


Comments: (4)

Foxanayn
This book may be the most valuable reading in the field of museum studies that I have completed. Conn references the other scholars I have read, and it is true that this reading might not have been as useful to me without knowledge of the scholarship he builds on. However, Conn brought the disparate theories together for me into a cohesive dialect on the status and nature of museums.
Conn sees a disconnect within museum studies, between the historic boom in museums and the downcast tone of those who write about museums. He finds fault the lack of distinction between culture and politics within the museum power paradigm, and discerns a need to remember the intellectual component of museums (as opposed to amusement). With attention to how architecture influences museum experiences, as well as an interest in how objects function in different museological contexts, concern for the rigidity of set disciplinary boundaries. Lastly, Conn examines the increased absence of objects (including reparation to cultures of origins), and the opposite problem of permanency and stagnation. Conn sees the substitution of museums and culture for politics, as well as the "business of culture" - using museums (and similar institutions) as an economic replacement for manufacturing, and the dilemmas of nostalgia and the need to forget, as the perils of the "museum age."
Adokelv
I was a bit disappointed by this book. In my perspective the title was not appropriate. I was looking for a book to discuss more intimately the meaning of objects in a more and more digitized world. Instead it gives more a resume of the museum and its history. Very interesting in general how museums came about and how some objects where used. A great book for historians.

Fidel Soto, Norway

BA(Hons)product design, MA in material culture and didacticism
Thozius
It's not that I didn't like this book, but I did think the author went off topic on too many occasions. Especially in the chapter "Where is the East". If I wanted all the historical background on how / why Asian objects made their way into the West, I'd read a book on Japanisme. He'd have done well to have kept his arguments tighter, and add a chapter on the digital object.
Kiutondyl
Fantastic, and hard to put down!
A must read!
Do Museums Still Need Objects? (The Arts and Intellectual Life in Modern America) download epub
World
Author: Steven Conn
ISBN: 0812241908
Category: History
Subcategory: World
Language: English
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (October 12, 2009)
Pages: 272 pages