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Clerical Celibacy in the West: c.1100-1700 (Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700) download epub

by Helen Parish


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Start by marking Clerical Celibacy in the West: . 100-1700 (Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700) as. .

Start by marking Clerical Celibacy in the West: . 100-1700 (Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Around this core area of study, the book also considers the influence of the early apostolic church and the example of the Greek church.

Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700 will appeal to academics and students interested in the history of late medieval and early modern western Christianity in global context. The series embraces any and all expressions of traditional religion, books in it will take many approaches, among them literary history, art history, and the history of science, and above all, interdisciplinary combinations of them. The Pilgrimage of Grace, a popular uprising in the north of England against Henry VIII's religious policies, has long been recognised as a crucial point in the fortunes of the English Reformation. Historians have long debated the motives of the rebels and what effects they had on government policy.

In this reassessment of the history of sacerdotal celibacy, Helen Parish examines the emergence and evolution of the celibate priesthood in the Latin church, and the challenges posed to this model of the ministry in the era of the Protestant Reformation. Celibacy was, and is, intensely personal, but also polemical, institutional, and historical

Clerical celibacy is the discipline within the Catholic Church by which only unmarried men are ordained to the episcopate, to the priesthood (with individual exceptions) in some autonomous particular Churches, and similarly to the diaconate (with ex.

Clerical celibacy is the discipline within the Catholic Church by which only unmarried men are ordained to the episcopate, to the priesthood (with individual exceptions) in some autonomous particular Churches, and similarly to the diaconate (with exceptions for certain categories of people). In other autonomous particular churches, the discipline applies only to the episcopate.

series Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700. Books related to Clerical Celibacy in the West: . 100-1700. The debate over clerical celibacy and marriage had its origins in the early Christian centuries, and is still very much alive in the modern church. The content and form of controversy have remained remarkably consistent, but each era has selected and shaped the sources that underpin its narrative, and imbued an ancient issue with an immediacy and relevance.

Parish Dr Helen (EN).

Helen Parish is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Reading. She is the author of Clerical Marriage and the English Reformation (2000), Monks, Miracles and Magic (2005), and a number of articles on religion, church, and clergy in the early modern period. In characteristically forceful tone, Pope Benedict XVI declared in 2005 that apostolic celibacy was a ’total entrustment to God’, and a ’total openness to the service of souls’.

Catholic Christendom, 1300–1700. Thomas Worcester (a1). College of the Holy Cross. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 29 September 2011.

Megan McLaughlin, "Parish, Helen, Clerical Celibacy in the West: c. 1100–1700," Speculum 88, no. 1 (January 2013): 328-329.

Thus Helen Parish concludes her magisterial study of clerical celibacy in the western church, proposing that arguments about the celibacy or marriage of the clergy have often served as proxies for deeper concerns about church governance, doctrine, and practice. In this detailed volume, which fills a neglected gap in the historiography of medieval and early modern Christianity, Parish makes it her objective to trace debates over clerical marriage from the time of the Gregorian reforms through the reformations of the sixteenth century.

The debate over clerical celibacy and marriage had its origins in the early Christian centuries, and is still very much alive in the modern church. The content and form of controversy have remained remarkably consistent, but each era has selected and shaped the sources that underpin its narrative, and imbued an ancient issue with an immediacy and relevance. The basic question of whether, and why, continence should be demanded of those who serve at the altar has never gone away, but the implications of that question, and of the answers given, have changed with each generation. In this reassessment of the history of sacerdotal celibacy, Helen Parish examines the emergence and evolution of the celibate priesthood in the Latin church, and the challenges posed to this model of the ministry in the era of the Protestant Reformation. Celibacy was, and is, intensely personal, but also polemical, institutional, and historical. Clerical celibacy acquired theological, moral, and confessional meanings in the writings of its critics and defenders, and its place in the life of the church continues to be defined in relation to broader debates over Scripture, apostolic tradition, ecclesiastical history, and papal authority. Highlighting continuity and change in attitudes to priestly celibacy, Helen Parish reveals that the implications of celibacy and marriage for the priesthood reach deep into the history, traditions, and understanding of the church.
Clerical Celibacy in the West: c.1100-1700 (Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700) download epub
World
Author: Helen Parish
ISBN: 0754639495
Category: History
Subcategory: World
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (July 28, 2010)
Pages: 294 pages