» » Journey to the East: The Jesuit Mission to China, 1579-1724

Journey to the East: The Jesuit Mission to China, 1579-1724 download epub

by Liam Matthew Brockey


Epub Book: 1962 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1330 kb.

Journey to the East : the Jesuit mission to China, 1579–1724, Liam Matthew Brockey

Journey to the East : the Jesuit mission to China, 1579–1724, Liam Matthew Brockey. p. cm. Includes bibiographical references (p. ) and index. In contrast to the worldly pretensions of secular agents of empire, such as merchants and mercenaries, the missionaries’.

Liam Brockey examines the proselytization strategies of the Jesuits in China during the years 1579–1724.

Liam Brockey examines the proselytization strategies of the Jesuits in China during the years 1579–1724 another important layer to our understanding of the Jesuit mission. Historians lamented the absence of a serious history of the Jesuit mission beyond the imperial city.

Mobile version (beta). Journey to the East: The Jesuit Mission to China, 1579-1724. Liam Matthew Brockey. Download (pdf, . 7 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Jesuit Mission to China, 1579–1724. This journey to the East is explored by Liam Brockey as he retraces the path of the Jesuit missionaries who sailed from Portugal to China, believing that, with little more than firm conviction and divine assistance, they could convert the Chinese to Christianity.

It had maintained itself as the world’s second largest economy from 1968 until 2010, till the time China overtook it. This probably happened because of the ‘rise of China’ and the change in economic and political circumstances with Japan at the end of twentieth century. Again twenty-first century has arrived with certain positive impetus to take Japan towards a brighter future.

This journey to the East is explored by Liam Brockey as he retraces the path of the Jesuit missionaries who sailed .

This journey to the East is explored by Liam Brockey as he retraces the path of the Jesuit missionaries who sailed from Portugal to China, believing that, with little more than firm conviction and divine assistance, they could convert the Chinese to Christianity. The first narrative history of the Jesuits’ mission from 1579 until the proscription of Christianity in China in 1724, this study is also the first to use extensive documentation of the enterprise found in Lisbon and Rome.

Journey to the East book. This 'Journey to the East' is explored by Liam Brockey as he retraces the path of the Jesuit missionaries who sailed from Portugal to China.

Liam Matthew Brockey creates a strong analogy with this classic tale in his Journey to the East, which chronicles the Jesuit mission that brought Christianity to China in late Ming and early Qing dynastic times. What a story it is, detailing a century and a half of missionary efforts that carried the Jesuits from high hopes to the depths of frustration and despair.

By Liam Matthew Brockey. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press/Belknap, 2007. Published: 1 December 2008. by University of Chicago Press. in The Journal of Modern History. The Journal of Modern History, Volume 80, pp 907-909; doi:10.

Brockey's story is that of the Jesuit missionaries who traveled to China to spread Christianity and Western learning, especially science - and . By Liam Matthew Brockey.

Brockey's story is that of the Jesuit missionaries who traveled to China to spread Christianity and Western learning, especially science - and the tensions that emerged when two great. Brockey's story is that of the Jesuit missionaries who traveled to China to spread Christianity and Western learning, especially science - and the tensions that emerged when two great civilizations came together.

It was one of the great encounters of world history: highly educated European priests confronting Chinese culture for the first time in the modern era. This “journey to the East” is explored by Liam Brockey as he retraces the path of the Jesuit missionaries who sailed from Portugal to China, believing that, with little more than firm conviction and divine assistance, they could convert the Chinese to Christianity. Moving beyond the image of Jesuits as cultural emissaries, his book shows how these priests, in the first concerted European effort to engage with Chinese language and thought, translated Roman Catholicism into the Chinese cultural frame and eventually claimed two hundred thousand converts.

The first narrative history of the Jesuits’ mission from 1579 until the proscription of Christianity in China in 1724, this study is also the first to use extensive documentation of the enterprise found in Lisbon and Rome. The peril of travel in the premodern world, the danger of entering a foreign land alone and unarmed, and the challenge of understanding a radically different culture result in episodes of high drama set against such backdrops as the imperial court of Peking, the villages of Shanxi Province, and the bustling cities of the Yangzi Delta region. Further scenes show how the Jesuits claimed conversions and molded their Christian communities into outposts of Baroque Catholicism in the vastness of China. In the retelling, this story reaches across continents and centuries to reveal the deep political, cultural, scientific, linguistic, and religious complexities of a true early engagement between East and West.


Comments: (7)

inform
I bought this book because of my interest in servant leadership. The father of modern servant leadership, Robert K. Greenleaf was raised as a Methodist and became a Quaker in his adult life, but contrary to popular belief, his Aha moment on servant leadership did not come from Jesus, but rather from this obscure book by the German novelist Hermann Hesse, who is best known for Siddhartha and Steppenwolf. Written as a novel but autobiographical in nature, Hesse describes (spoiler alert ahead) a mythical expedition in search of the elusive “League.” On this trek, Hesse met a man named Leo who carried the trekkers’ luggage and did menial chores. Everyone loved the servant Leo, but when he disappeared, the expedition fell into disarray. After decades of anguish searching for Leo, Hesse found him—and discovered Leo was the leader of the League. The Big Idea was that Leo was a great leader all along, but the members of the expedition couldn’t see it. Once the author opened his eyes, the truth of servant leadership stared him in the face. That opened Robert K. Greenleaf’s eyes as well.
Adaly
Whenever I face terror or pain and begin to crumble, I read this book. May it be the last book I ever read.
Ffrlel
A must if you really want to know where the term 'Servant Leader' orginated. Too often individuals believe then know what a servant leader is and how a servant leader should act. This original book that started the entire concept is a quick read.
Rich Vulture
Just reread Journey to the East....and it was even more meaningful and profound than the first time when I was just starting out, fifty years ago, on my own journey.
Balhala
Hermann Hesse wrote some of the most important novels and essays of the twentieth century. His primary literary work (part materialist protest, part spiritual quest) spanned almost half a century (1899-1943) and culminated in the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946. He lived through the pain of World Wars I & II and looked outside Europe for alternative philosophies. He became a Swiss citizen in 1923 and lived in exile from his native Germany, in part because of his anti-war views. The problems that troubled Hesse then are still with us, and he is more popular today than he was in his own lifetime.

"Journey to the East," published in 1932 is the 'short version' of his spiritual philosophy ("The Glass Bead Game" is the long version). Both books draw deeply from Hesse's fascination with Indian philosophy. Both are immersed in the search for alternatives. "Journey to the East" is the geographical and spiritual journey taken by one man (League Brother H) with a group of like-minded, journeyers sometime after World War I. H says:

"It was my destiny to join in a great experience. Having had the good fortune to belong to the League, I was permitted to be a participant in a unique journey. What wonder it had at the time!"

The nature of the journey, its purpose, and even its outcome is a mystery -- Hesse's parable of spareness, about how we make choices and how we might live. The servant, Leo, says to H. early in the novel:

"The law of service. He who wishes to live long must serve, but he who wishes to rule does not live long."

"The Journey to the East" - like all of Hesse's work - offers another way to think about our lives and live(!) in a world ever-maddened by wars, greed, and inattention. The journey is the Tao of Hesse, one might say, a novel part parable.
Manemanu
A quest for one's self, a journey into the abyss of the soul, the alienation and loss of belief on the way, the tragic realization. The real self has always been there. It was me to stop listening to him
Usishele
Not light reading. I found it difficult to "get into" the story, but the message is very compelling and thought provocative. I read it because of the frequent references to it in the "servant leadership" leadership and the reputation of H. Hesse
I must admit I was somewhat disappointed with this short book. It seemed to all lead up to Hesse's message regarding the responsibility of the self to accept the responsibility of guiding others and that pure followers are doomed to disappear. One only imagines that Hesse had an idea, almost like a dream, where a couple sentences summarizes an array of experiences whereby one feels like he has been through the entire journey with him yet cannot recall details. Although at times interesting, this book seems to be Hesse's period of contemplation before undertaking The Glass Bead Game.
Journey to the East: The Jesuit Mission to China, 1579-1724 download epub
World
Author: Liam Matthew Brockey
ISBN: 0674024486
Category: History
Subcategory: World
Language: English
Publisher: Belknap Press; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (March 1, 2007)
Pages: 512 pages