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A Jump for Life: A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-occupied Poland download epub

by Ruth. Altbeker Cyprys


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A Jump for Life book. A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-Occupied Poland.

A Jump for Life book. Publisher: Constable. Heartbreaking but so enlightening regarding the role of non-Jewish and Jewish Poles in Warsaw during WW II. The Author is a good friend of my British cousin, which made it all the more real and terrifying. Feb 27, 2017 Franco Forleo rated it it was amazing.

Jump for Life : A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-occupied Poland. This valuable journal, written just after the war, was discovered by the author's daughter a half century later, after her mother passed away in 1979

Jump for Life : A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-occupied Poland. By (author) Ruth Altbeker Cyprys. This valuable journal, written just after the war, was discovered by the author's daughter a half century later, after her mother passed away in 1979. As evidenced in this journal, her courage, stamina, and flair for dramatic details are impressive. For instance, she recalls how in 1939 the haughty German victors marched into Warsaw "through empty streets where fires had not yet been extinguished and human and animal corpses not buried.

Ruth Altbeker Cyprys writes of her struggle to survive, and keep Eva alive, both in and outside the Warsaw Ghetto.

August 17, 2010 History found in the catalog. Ruth Altbeker Cyprys. A Jump for Life; a Survivor's Journal from Nazi-Occupied Poland. Are you sure you want to remove A Jump for Life; a Survivor's Journal from Nazi-Occupied Poland from your list? A Jump for Life; a Survivor's Journal from Nazi-Occupied Poland. by Ruth Altbeker Cyprys. Published 1998 by Continuum, 1998.

Ruth Altbeker Cyprys A Jump for Life: A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-Occupied Poland. ISBN 13: 9780826410979. A Jump for Life: A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-Occupied Poland.

After the war, Cyprys joined her parents and sister in Palestine. She was uncomfortable there, feeling that ""being Jewish was like choosing to be persecuted, choosing death,"" and eventually joined her brother in England.

CYPRYS, RUTH ALTBEKER (Author) POTTER, ELAINE (Author) Constable (Publisher). Fragile identity survival in Nazi-occupied Belgium. whole: Dimensions: 24cm. Pagination: vi, 243p. 8p. of plates il. facsims. How has war in the air changed over time? KS3-4.

A Jump for Life: A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-Occupied Poland: Ruth Altbeker Cyprys, Elaine Potter . I have read numerous Holocaust survivor stories and I am very glad I added this one. The author has a unique and interesting perspective

I have read numerous Holocaust survivor stories and I am very glad I added this one. The author has a unique and interesting perspective. I am so glad books like this exist for future generations to hear the truth.

Ruth Altbeker Cyprys has written: 'A Jump for Life' - subject(s): Biography, Ethnic relations, Holocaust survivors, Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) . A Jump for Life; a Survivor's Journal from Nazi-Occupied Poland'.

Ruth Altbeker Cyprys has written: 'A Jump for Life' - subject(s): Biography, Ethnic relations, Holocaust survivors, Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), Jewish women, Jews, Large type books, Personal narratives, Personal narratives, Polish, Polish Personal narratives, World War, 1939-1945.

A Jump for Life: A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-occupied Poland by Ruth Altbeker Cyprys. The Holocaust: A History of the Jews of Europe During the Second World War by Sir Martin Gilbert. The Righteous: The Unsung Heroes of the Holocaust by Sir Martin Gilbert.


Comments: (7)

CONVERSE
I was absolutely amazed with this book, there was so much going on it was difficult to keep track of. I was also fascinated with Ruth, what an incredible woman. She was so smart, how many women lawyers were there back in the 1930's? She got around every awful thing the Germans did, by pretending to be pregnant, pretending to be poor or sick and finally even before it happened refusing to be shipped to Treblinka and die with her daughter. What courage this woman had to be able to save herself and her daughter. What an awesome book, I'm so glad I read it.
Shalinrad
Incredibly brave and daring escape story. This woman's luck was matched only by her daring and determination to survive the war with her young daughter.
GoodLike
An amazing woman who lived during an evil time. Very informative about life in Warsaw before, and during world war 2.
Bev
Great book. Real Holocaust story. Not the Hollywood nonsense that unfortunately dominates mass media.
Skrimpak
The journal of Ruth Altbeker tells of of the circumstances and experiences during the Holocaust of a young Jewish lawyer and her small daughter.

The writer of this journal writes with sharp wit and sensitivity and shows a phenomenal memory, and it was this together with her incredible courage, together with the help of Polish friends and acquaintances that allowed Ruth and her baby daughter Eva to survive.
The journal was written soon after the Second World War, but was only published over 50 years later after it was found by her daughters following the writers passing in 1979.
Ruth Altbeker Cyprys writes of her struggle to survive, and keep Eva alive, both in and outside the Warsaw Ghetto.
She vividly recounts the roundups and deportations of Jews to Treblinka death camp beginning in July, 1942.
In those first seven weeks of the terrifying roundups and 'resettlement to the east' 265 000 Warsaw Jews were sent to their deaths in the gas chambers of Treblinka.

It was Ruth Altbeker's escape by jumping out of the train bound for Treblinka, and arranging for her daughter to be thrown after her, that kept them alive.
The author writes of how the Jews of the ghetto kept hope alive in the darkest days when death hang over them like a shadow-their anthem bin the ghetto being Hatikva-the Hope, to become the anthem of the re-established State of Israel after the war, where most Holocaust survivors resettled.
Ruth Altbeker witnessed the liquidation of the Korczac orphanage, from where hundreds of Jewish children were sent to their deaths.

She also deals with the disturbing subject of Jewish informers and those who helped the Nazis in other ways, to destroy their own people.
This is pertinent to read when morally bankrupt people of Jewish birth are doing all they can to destroy the Jewish State and subject her Jews to another Holocaust.

It is important to remember the events of the Holocaust at the time when the fires of hate against Jews and Israel are engulfing the world again, driven by those who would like to see millions of Jews, again, destroyed.
MrCat
I read this book about 6 years ago, in a period when I read every Holocaust testimony I could lay my hands on, to help me understand the first hand testimony I, alone, had received from a lifelong friend who herself survived the Vilna ghetto, and three concentration camps.

As Cat R reports, the author's daughter found her mother's manuscript in 1979, after the former had died. The text gives a very personal account of the Nazi invasion of Poland, this one from the perspective of a Warsaw native shipped with her small daughter, in January 1943, aboard a cattle car from the ghetto, bound to a certain death at Treblinka.

Certain except that she fought back. She knew from rumors what happened there. With a hacksaw blade she had concealed, she determined to saw through the bars of one of two small windows in her car, and reached them from the shoulders of two strong young boys willing to help her.

To ensure that the boys threw her daughter out the window after she had jumped, Eva gave a bag of chocolate, sugar and bread to a sympathetic friend too old to join her, and asked her to ensure they got it if they did as she had asked.

The jump was but the beginning of one Jewish mother's perilous and somehow miraculous bid to survive--with her child.

In the end, the sufferings of this mother and child were far less severe than those of my friend Masha. Nevertheless, this is a gripping, and important account, not to be missed.

--Alyssa A. Lappen
Ironrunner
It is ironic that the author of this amazing journal never saw her work published, instead it was her two daughters who published it after her death. It is a gripping read,and recounts how the author escapes a death train heading to Treblinka by sawing off the bars on the window of the train and jumping out of it into the wilderness, together with her 2 yr old daughter! It is so much more than an account of survival, it gives one pause for thought as to what one would do given similar circumstances...I myself am mother to a toddler, and reading this just made me feel connected to the author, in that I too would do anything for my child, but do I possess the same courage as Ruth? It's impossible to imagine her life in occupied Poland, trying to live on the Aryan side, amongst Gentiles, keeping her daughter amongst strangers, not knowing if she will be saved...this is an amazing account of a woman's courage, a mother's love, and undying faith.
A Jump for Life: A Survivor's Journal from Nazi-occupied Poland download epub
World
Author: Ruth. Altbeker Cyprys
ISBN: 0753150018
Category: History
Subcategory: World
Publisher: BCA; Large Print Ed edition (1998)
Pages: 368 pages