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Women and Christianity: The First Thousand Years (Women and Christianity (Paperback)) download epub

by Mary T. Malone


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This text by Mary Malone is the first volume in a series on women in Christianity; the first volume covers the first thousand years of Christendom, and the second from the year 1000 to the Reformation

This text by Mary Malone is the first volume in a series on women in Christianity; the first volume covers the first thousand years of Christendom, and the second from the year 1000 to the Reformation. This volume covers the period from the beginning of Christianity to about the year 1000 (actually, most historians make the break at the year 1054, when the split between East and West was formalized), and as Malone states in the first chapter, 'The history of Christianity shows great ambivalence towards women.

Women and Christianity book. She uses women's writings and voices as primary sources on almost every page. All wo Women have enriched and enabled Christianity for more than 2,000 years.

Orbis Books, Trade Paperback. Women have enriched and enabled Christianity for more than 2,000 years. In this, the first of three path-breaking volumes, theologian Mary T. Malone situates Christian women in their time and context, thus creating a continuous historical narrative rather than simply a series of vignettes. All women, Christian or otherwise, who seek an understanding of their past will value this unprecedented, comprehensive history of Christian women and their contributions, not only to faith but to civilization.

Women have enriched and enabled Christianity for more than 2,000 years.

The final volume of a historical trilogy that documents the lives and contributions of Christian women from the beginnings of Christianity to the current day. show more.

The roles of women in Christianity can vary considerably today as they have varied historically since the third century New Testament church. This is especially true in marriage and in formal ministry positions within certain Christian denominations, churches, and parachurch organizations. Many leadership roles in the organized church have been prohibited to women.

On Women, Christianity, and History: An Interview with Michele Roberts By Bastida Rodriguez, Patricia Atlantis .

On Women, Christianity, and History: An Interview with Michele Roberts By Bastida Rodriguez, Patricia Atlantis, revista de la Asociación Española de Estudios s, Vol. 25, No. 1, June 2003.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Women and Christianity: Vol 1 by. .Short Title FROM 1000 TO THE REFORMATION V. Author Mary T. Malone. Christianity: General.

Short Title FROM 1000 TO THE REFORMATION V. Country of Publication United States.

Women have enriched and enabled Christianity for more than 2,000 years. In this, the first of three path-breaking volumes, theologian Mary T. Malone situates Christian women in their time and context, thus creating a continuous historical narrative rather than simply a series of vignettes. She uses women's writings and voices as primary sources on almost every page. All women, Christian or otherwise, who seek an understanding of their past will value this unprecedented, comprehensive history of Christian women and their contributions, not only to faith but to civilization.

Comments: (6)

Ber
Given Mr. Erfurt's detailed review, there is not much to say about the content of the book itself. I had this as a supplementary text on Christianity since the Reformation, and it was an excellent complement to Justo Gonzales' history. Oddly enough, I would rate it more highly for a person to read on their own instead of a text for a graduate level course.

I agree with Mr. Erfurt that the Index should have been more complete. There was no reference to things such as Pentecostalism, which made big strides in having women and men, white and blacks in on an equal basis. I also found some misspellings in the Index, as when Daphne Hampson's last name was spelled "Hamson". Fortunately, the page reference did direct me to "Hampson". I will also agree with Mr. Erfurt on the Bibliography. It is good, but not "great".

This book is good for the lay reader, as it is quite easy to read and it is not overly encumbered with footnotes. This same characteristic makes it less suitable as a text. I often found statements for which there is no documentation / notes on who made the statement and in what work. It is not that I distrust the author, it is just that I would like to get more details on some statements, and the author provides no connections. If you wish to do research on this subject, this book may be a bit thin on help. But, if you know nothing about the subject at all, its a quite decent start.

For the sake of my Moravian friends, yes, the Moravians are mentioned in one sentence on page 38.
Ricep
Product as described. Good service. Thank You. Highly recommend.
energy breath
Very scholarly - doctorial referenced work - strong feminist point of view
Mr Freeman
Very scholarly - doctorial referenced work - strong feminist point of view
Tar
This text by Mary Malone is the third volume in a series on women in Christianity; the first volume covers the first thousand years of Christendom, and the second from the year 1000 to the Reformation. This volume covers the period from the Reformation to the present, and as Malone states in her introduction, 'the increasing visibility of women on the ecclesial and cultural scenes...adds a new complexity' to the task of the book. There are women in Catholic and Protestant circles who are household names and those who are relatively unknown, yet important for various historical reasons. Sometimes, as Malone notes, the better-known figures are not necessarily easier to analyse, given the various traditions and ideas that have grown up around their personae, rather than their actual personal histories.

Like many historians of late, Malone sees the period commonly referred to as 'the Reformation' rather as a series of reformations. She notes the irony that this period created for the role of women, both redefining their relationship to men and the general cultural, but also providing direct biblical justification (in many interpretations) for keeping women in subordinate and out of leadership positions, particularly in the churches. This kind of paradox is seen more clearly in nations where women were in leadership positions - the role of Elizabeth I as ruler in England created a tension in the way to view women's roles; the irony continued to the late twentieth century, where the female Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and the reigning monarch, the second Queen Elizabeth, were responsible for appointing the bishops in the Church of England, who by church law could only be male.

First, Malone looks at issue of continuity and change. Beginning with Christine de Pizan, who was the first professional female author in France, through leaders such as Isabella of Spain and Catherine of Aragon (King Henry VIII's ill-fated first wife), Malone looks at historical issues of interpretation and substance. She addresses general topics of history (who, what, when, where, etc.) but also looks with a feminist eye at particular issues, such as the issue of persecution of women as witches being in fact a cipher for anti-woman sentiment at large, often with a bias against the poorer classes of people generally.

Women and the Reformation addresses the way history is often portrayed - a two-tiered narrative, one Catholic and one Protestant, both focussed upon the leaders, key events, and primary issues, most of which ignored the presence and contribution of women along the way. Malone notes that Luther was not the first reformer voice (highlighting Wycliff and Hus much earlier), and showed that in some movements such as the Lollards, women assumed key roles, and sometimes were put to death for their involvement. Malone highlights women such as Ursula Jost, who went from Catholic to Lutheran to Anabaptist in a matter of a few years, and was publicly acknowledged as a leader, having had mystical visions that were heard by her community. Malone also highlights Sister Jeanne, a woman who remained faithful to the Catholic cause, who wrote during a time of monastic/convent dissolution and widespread abandonment of Catholic clergy practices by the new Protestant clerical class.

Malone devotes a chapter to Teresa of Avila and Catholic Reform; Teresa is a mystic whose popularity crosses denominational and jurisdiction lines today. Going from this to the creation of new women's communities and roles in society, she includes an emphasis in institutions of education and health care. Founded by women such as Mary Ward, Angela Merci, Louise de Marillc and Jane de Chantal, many of these communities continue a presence into the modern world, being seeds that formed ideas for later women such as Ann Seton (America's first 'homegrown' saint) and Mother Theresa to follow.

Malone then looks at Protestant women, including missionaries that went around the world. These include Elizabeth Hooten, the first female Quaker preacher; Jane Lead, a Protestant prophetic mystic; and Anne Hutchinson, who was persecuted by her Massachusetts colony community, ostensibly for theological differences, but primarily for being a woman who dared to speak and preach. She was eventually excommunicated by her community.

Malone's look at the Marian Age refers to the growing popularity of Marian devotions in Catholic circles (including the doctrine of Immaculate Conception, becoming official Catholic doctrine in the mid-1800s). It also looks at a time when, by and large, the role of women in church and society was fairly uniform across Catholic, Protestant and secular society. Feminine qualities were paradoxically held to be more Christ-like and more mature/refined/civilised on the one hand, and yet somehow deficient and incapable of leadership and spiritual fullness on the other.

Malone discusses the modern situation in the final three chapters. The growing educational levels and opportunities afforded to women led to the advent of organised and consistent feminist philosophies and ethics of life. This went beyond the church into secular arenas, sometimes more fully expressed there. Malone looks at both the successes and failures of Vatican II to address issues in the modern world, highlight the lack of discussion on issues that directly affect women in many of the deliberations. With regard to Protestant institutions, various denominations have wrestled with women's issues according to differing timelines, and appealing to different theological sources, have arrived at different standards. Drawing on feminist theological issues, Malone goes beyond these to explore topics in women's spirituality more generally, and global liberation theologies that will continue to influence Christian directions into the future.

The book has a useful and comprehensive bibliography, but the index is incomplete - it lists people and places, but not ideas, key words or events, which would be more helpful.

Very readable, very interesting, Malone's work is worthwhile to anyone with an interest in the development of Christianity. Malone sees the current feminist movement as both a challenge and opportunity for Christianity, and this three-volume series helps support both ideas.
Centrizius
This text by Mary Malone is the first volume in a series on women in Christianity; the first volume covers the first thousand years of Christendom, and the second from the year 1000 to the Reformation. This volume covers the period from the beginning of Christianity to about the year 1000 (actually, most historians make the break at the year 1054, when the split between East and West was formalized), and as Malone states in the first chapter, 'The history of Christianity shows great ambivalence towards women.' Sometimes, the history is not so ambivalent, as when Peter Damian (an eleventh-century saint) exhibits a kind of 'road-rage' (Malone's term) against women; on the other hand, papal pronouncements about equality of the sexes in marriage or before God are often mitigated by the perceived need of hierarchical order, brought out by 'the sin of Eve'.

Malone's first chapter is one on method. She discusses the issues of conventional history, with its strengths and limitations, as well as new methods of reading and interpreting texts and silences, both in the biblical texts themselves and the later historical witness. We must recognise, according to Malone, that history is written for a purpose (and hence is not a simple, objective record of events). She makes the distinction between 'Christian history' and 'church history', claiming that the later makes theological assessments often inappropriate to the greater story of Christian history. She also introduces a technical term - periodisation, the idea of separating history into discrete, manageable periods; this division can often distort (even inadvertently).

Malone's feminist methodology sets out to deliberately search out and emphasise the voices of women in history, as well as critically reflect on the way in which women and their issues are portrayed. Her stated goal for this book 'is not write a history of women, but to redirect our historical attention.' She states (as is important with the idea of feminist history) what her biases are, and that she does not claim objectivity or neutrality.

The first section looks at women in the biblical texts and first centuries of Christian history. These include Mary, the mother of Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and other women who often remain unnamed in the biblical witness, hence becoming known by their story (the woman at the well, the healed woman, etc.). She touches on the ideas of feminist exegesis and feminist hermeneutics as compensatory, revolutionary, and transformative. Women in the early stories of Christianity include householders and sponsors, including some who warrant the title 'apostle', such as Junia and Phoebe. Paul's writing on women in inconsistent in the epistles (if they are meant to be all equally universally applied, rather than messages to specific communities addressing particular situations). Malone concludes this section by looking at the portrayal of women in apocryphal and Gnostic literature.

The second section of the text looks at the different roles of women in the developing church; one of the primary roles includes that of martyr. Women suffered alongside their male community members in the various repressions, and some of the strongest witnesses to faith come from women of this time (Blandina and Perpetua, among others). Sometimes, however, the witness of certain women was held to be suspect, as evidenced by Irenaeus' work against some women in southern Gaul. Women also took status as widows (an unordained but important office, one that 'died of its own ambiguities', according to Malone) and deaconess, an office that seems to have involved ordination prayers and charges. Terminology at this time is ambiguous and not universally consistent, however, so it is difficult to determine exactly these kinds of offices. These ideas led to the development of an idealised vision of virginity, coinciding with the rise of monastic communities for both men and women.

This leads naturally to the third section of the book, which looks a women in leadership roles in these monastic communities (some Abbesses were very powerful) as well as their role in missionary activity throughout Europe as part of the growing monastic movement. Despite the appearance of some strong figures, this was a period in which the continued participation of women in the leadership of the church generally was sharply curtailed, eventually ending with a near-silence from women in any corridor of power and authority. In some locations, the church hierarchy became co-equal with the aristocracy (often being drawn from the same families).

Malone's final chapter looks at the legend of Pope Joan, and Hroswitha of Gandersheim, a poet/dramatist who is credited with being the first Christian dramatist. Malone uses a narrative theological historical method to present these figures.

The book has a useful and comprehensive bibliography, but the index is incomplete - it lists people and places, but not ideas, key words or events, which would be more helpful. It begins with a useful timeline by which to anchor the various events chronologically.

Very readable, very interesting, Malone's work is worthwhile to anyone with an interest in the development of Christianity. Malone sees the current feminist movement as both a challenge and opportunity for Christianity, and this three-volume series helps support both ideas.
Women and Christianity: The First Thousand Years (Women and Christianity (Paperback)) download epub
World
Author: Mary T. Malone
ISBN: 1570753660
Category: History
Subcategory: World
Language: English
Publisher: Orbis Books (March 1, 2001)
Pages: 276 pages