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The Lady and The Monk: Four Seasons in Kyoto download epub

by Ralph Cosham,Pico Iyer


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Subtitled "Four Seasons in Kyoto", this 1992 book by the British travel writer, Pico Iyer, is more than . And the relationship between Iyer and Sachiko left me annoyed

Subtitled "Four Seasons in Kyoto", this 1992 book by the British travel writer, Pico Iyer, is more than just a book about a place. Mr. Iyer spent a year in Kyoto to learn about Zen as well as Japan. Along the way he met a very special woman, Sachiko, and learned more about the essence of being Japanese than he ever expected. And the relationship between Iyer and Sachiko left me annoyed. But for a unique picture of Kyoto and a deeper understanding of the cross-cultural differences between Japanese and Westerners, I do give it a definite recommendation. 2 people found this helpful.

The book follows Iyer through 4 seasons spent in Kyoto, initially in pursuit of Zen Buddhism. Having once been an avid reader of Time magazine,Pico Iyer's name was familiar to me but I didn't know he could write so well. This is not a typical travel book

The book follows Iyer through 4 seasons spent in Kyoto, initially in pursuit of Zen Buddhism. However, he soon meets a Japanese lady in her early 30's, married (unhappily it would seem) with 2 children, and she becomes the main focus of the story and with his infatuation with Japan. This is not a typical travel book. This is a book to be read slowly,and to be savoured,over and over, again and again. It is worth reading for the sheer.

When Pico Iyer decided to go to Kyoto and live in a monastery, he did so. .

When Pico Iyer decided to go to Kyoto and live in a monastery, he did so to learn about Zen Buddhism from the inside, to get to know Kyoto, one of the loveliest old cities in the world, and to find out something about Japanese culture today - not the world of businessmen and production lines, but the traditional world of changing seasons and the silence of temples, of the images woven through literature, of the lunar Japan that still lives on behind the rising sun of geopolitical power

Pico Iyer has been based since 1992 in Nara, Japan, where he lives with his Japanese wife, Hiroko Takeuchi, the "Lady" of his second book, and her two .

Pico Iyer has been based since 1992 in Nara, Japan, where he lives with his Japanese wife, Hiroko Takeuchi, the "Lady" of his second book, and her two children from his wife's earlier marriage. Iyer's family home in Santa Barbara burned down due to a wildfire in 1990, a biographical landmark that perhaps confirmed his lifelong peripatetic perspective on 'being at home' in general. The Lady and the Monk: Four Seasons in Kyoto (August 1991 /. ISBN 0-679-40308-6; New York: Knopf, September 1991, hardback; Vintage, October 1992, paperback /. ISBN 0-679-73834-7).

Praise for PICO IYER’S THE LADY AND THE MONK Brilliant and poetically charge. The lady and the monk: four seasons in Kyoto, Pico Iyer. 1st Vintage departures ed. p. c. (Vintage departures). he chapters chronicle and color the Japanese seasons, summoning with great effects the sounds of temple. Originally published: New York: Knopf, 1991.

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Pico Iyer, Ralph Cosham. When Pico Iyer decided to go to Kyoto and live in a monastery, he did so to learn about Zen Buddhism from the inside, to get to know Kyoto, one of the loveliest old cities in the world, and to find out something about Japanese culture today-not the world of businessmen and production lines, but the traditional world of changing. Seasons and the silence of temples, of the images woven through literature, of the lunar Japan that still lives on behind the rising sun of geopolitical power. All this he did. And then he met Sachiko.

New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by abowser on October 19, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Pico Iyer captures the spirit of Kyoto as a foreigner in this book. I stayed up all night reading the Lady and the Monk. Iyer portrays in his book the difficulty in communication between Japanese women and the foreigners they fall for. The mysticism of O-Bon, the Japanese festival of the dead. This is the second book I have read by Pico Aver, the other being Video nights in Katmandu. I teach Japanese woman in Hawaii, and I can attest that Sachiko is real.

[This is the MP3CD audiobook format.] When Pico Iyer decided to go to Kyoto and live in a monastery, he did so to learn about Zen Buddhism from the inside, to get to know Kyoto, one of the loveliest old cities in the world, and to find out something about Japanese culture today--not the world of businessmen and production lines, but the traditional world of changing seasons and the silence of temples, of the images woven through literature, of the lunar Japan that still lives on behind the rising sun of geopolitical power. All this he did. And then he met Sachiko. Vivacious, attractive, thoroughly educated, speaking English enthusiastically if eccentrically, the wife of a Japanese ''salaryman'' who seldom left the office before 10pm, Sachiko was as conversant with tea ceremony and classical Japanese literature as with rock music, Goethe, and Vivaldi. With the lightness of touch that made Video Night in Kathmandu so captivating, Pico Iyer fashions from their relationship a marvelously ironic yet heartfelt book that is at once a portrait of cross-cultural infatuation--and misunderstanding--and a delightfully fresh way of seeing both the old Japan and the very new.

Comments: (7)

Nafyn
This beautiful book sold me on both Iyer and Japan. In this thoughtful volume, Iyer details his perplexing and wonderful experiences as he attempted to understand another culture. The process is not so easy! But I love Iyer's narrative. He set out to Japan to clear his head, to think, to be alone. Then reality hit, and his year turned into something completely different.

People who chose to study or live abroad are either quite brave or quite naive. Their experiences can send them to heights of pleasure and back to their own drawing boards. Iyer's frank explanation of both successes and failures in his new culture make this book a special treasure. I was enthralled while reading every page.

Although I had already been to Japan when I found this book, now I can't wait to return, not to mimic Iyer's adventure, which would be impossible, but to appreciate even more of his observations and difficulties.
Whitehammer
First time reading anything from this Author and I enjoyed it thoroughly as I recently came back from a trip to Japan. And helped me understand much of what I saw and felt.
Anasius
Great insight into the teachings of ZEN. And also the real-life everyday social & cultural expectations of Japanese women, and their sensitivities and inner struggles with personal friendships/companionships. A Great read. Lots of colorful histories of Japanese temples and also highlights of the city of KYOTO culture. 5-STARS!
Otrytrerl
I read Lady and the Monk before my first trip to Japan in 2008 and liked it enough that I broke my rule of trying to find new homes for non-work books in hopes of keeping my shelves to a dull roar. I just booked another trip and am glad I kept it because I'm going to give it a re-read.
Nilador
Any reviewer can find something wrong with a book, if s/he tries hard enough. And many have been quick to do so here. I suppose I could as well (e.g., by picking on Iyer for not going into the implications of the faux-Utopian society Japan has created). But I have absolutely no desire to do so. The book is so beautifully and deftly written, the romance so touching and piquant without falling into bathos, that it would, to me be similar to picking at the lovely haikus interspersed herein, stylistically complementing the lyrical writing.

Yes, as one reviewer has pointed out, it is more memoir than what is called "Travel Literature"-though the boundaries between the two have always seemed blurry to me at best.

This book will be enjoyed most by lovers of poetry, lyrical poetry - such as that of Yeats and Shelley, than by readers of the "hard-boiled" school of travel writing epitomized in V.S. Naipaul's works. If you believe that poetry is the deepest sort of writing, that one can get to "know" a society or people better through a Romantic relationship with a member of that society than by doing a Sociological study of it, if your dream life is as important to you as waking life, in short, if you have a poetic nature: This is the book for you!

"Everyone falls in love with what he cannot begin to understand."--Or, as Pico finds out, thinks he cannot, but through patience and love finds that he can...begin.

PS-Pico and Sachiko are still together, according to wikipedia at any event.
Ghordana
The title of this book is a bit misleading. Yes, Pico Iyer does live in a monastery for a few days but his main emphasis is an exploration of Kyoto, one of the holiest cities in Japan.
The title comes from a Buddhist story about a beautiful woman who tempted a monk, much as Buddha was tempted by an evil god as he sat under the Bodhi tree searching for enlightenment.
Pico is an essayist for Time magazine and he is far more interested in the somewhat schizophrenic nature of the Japanese people than he is in Buddhism. His main subject is a housewife named Sachiko who is married to a Japanese "salary man," who works from six in the morning until eleven at night. His family life is an afterthought. Sachiko loves everything foreign from the Beatles to Mickey Mouse. She calls Pico a "bird" because he is free to wander all over the globe while she is a slave to her husband and two young children.
According to Iyer, Japan is close to a utopian society and Kyoto is the cleanest city he's ever seen. Sachiko is a fascinating character. When she introduces Pico to her children she apologizes for their misbehavior although they are much more well-behaved than western children Pico has known.
Pico and Sachiko's relationship is perplexing at first. She hints that she might want something more than a platonic relationship. He's wise enough to know that it's the dream of a romance, the romance she's seen in the movies, that she's after.
There are some wonderful moments in THE LADY AND THE MONK: Sachiko's mangled English with the occasional Japanese word thrown in and the lack of articles; Iyer's description of cherry blossom time; the albino monk Pico meets when he stays at the temple; the Hanchu Tigers last game of the year when Randy Bass, their American homerun hitter, bows to the fans fifteen times. The fans are just as enthusiastic as they would be if this were a World Series team and not a team thirty-some games out of first.
The main emphasis of the book, though, is Sachiko's story arc; we see her beginning to grow away from her salaryman husband, we see her trying to make her dreams become a reality, despite the censure of her mother and friends. We get the impression that the more Japanese women are exposed to the West the more Sachikos there will be.
The Lady and The Monk: Four Seasons in Kyoto download epub
World
Author: Ralph Cosham,Pico Iyer
ISBN: 1441785302
Category: History
Subcategory: World
Language: English
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.; MP3CD Unabridged edition (April 20, 2011)