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Reel Art: Great Posters from the Golden Age of the Silver Screen download epub

by Richard Allen,Stephen Rebello


Epub Book: 1716 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1913 kb.

In their lively, intelligent survey of poster art from the early days to the end of the 1940s, the authors effectively . The book's printing is first class using a 175 screen on a thickish matt art paper. There is a design flaw, in my opinion, in that so many posters are angled on the page.

In their lively, intelligent survey of poster art from the early days to the end of the 1940s, the authors effectively demonstrate how the poster combined with other elements (promotional gimmicks, theater lobby design) to lure patrons to the box office. They go on to discuss different approaches to poster design, the working methods of the various artists, and the history of the early studios, also offering brief biographies of the major poster artists.

Reel art: great posters from the golden age of the silver screen. Reel Art. Great Posters from the Golden Age of the Silver Screen. A world-class selection of great movie posters and the stories of their creation. By Stephen Rebello, Richard Allen. Release Date October 12, 1998.

In 2019, Stephen Rebello optioned and adapted for the screen a '40s-era British thriller novel; the screen version, set in. .

In 2019, Stephen Rebello optioned and adapted for the screen a '40s-era British thriller novel; the screen version, set in contemporary London and Scotland is currently in development. His satirical non-fiction book, dramatizing the true clash of an embattled cast, crew, writers, and pair of studio heads during the making of a scandalous high-profile Hollywood movie the '60s, will be published in 2020 by Viking Penguin. Reel Art - Great Posters From the Golden Age of the Silver Screen (with Richard C. Allen) (1988), Abbeville Press.

The General', 'Casablanca', 'Gone with the Wind' - we all know they don't. Stephen Rebello is a screenwriter, journalist, and the author of such books as Reel Art: Great Posters from the Golden Age of the Silver Screen, which was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1999.

book by Stephen Rebello. The decades between 1910 and 1950 were the golden age of the American movie poster, an era when films were promoted through the talents of illustrators like Thomas Hart Benton and Norman Rockwell. A selection of these posters, many never before published, is presented in this miniature volume.

Subjects include classic movies and history of film. Pics below include cover (feature pic) plus two inside pages pics.

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Book Binding:Paperback. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know! Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Rebello, Stephen, and Richard Allen. Focus on film posters of the early and Classic era, from 1910 through 1950. Fine condition in a near fine dust jacket. Published by Abbeville Press, New York (1988). ISBN 10: 0896598691 ISBN 13: 9780896598690.

The majority are from the thirties and they sold Hollywood round the world. The twenty chapters look at most movie genres each starting from an historical perspective and nicely there are plenty of mono photos to illustrate points in the text. The captions to each poster has technical details (date; studio; art director; artist; dimensions) then some background detail about the movie

Presents works from the golden age of movie posters, discusses their origins, and profiles the artists--including Norman Rockwell, Thomas Hart Benton, and other notables--who created them

Comments: (7)

Katius
This book is fantastic!! Couldn't be happier.Well worth the price I paid for it.
Marirne
My father-inlaw has it framed and on his wall.
Kabandis
This undisputed classic actually surpasses its reputation. The sumptuous, coffee table-style volume, over 340 pages, would be worth owning alone for its eye-popping reproduction of rare poster images that advertised such films as King Kong, It Happened One Night, Dracula, The Old Dark House, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, Casablanca, Gilda, Gone With the Wind, It's a Wonderful Life, The Wizard of Oz and hundreds of others. Each chapter is beautifully organized into genres making the tome as compulsively entertaining as it is enlightening. Don't mistake this one for any of the other copycat poster books, though, which merely display page after page of images with no analysis or comment. What makes Reel Art a must-have, definitive book on the subject is its witty, hefty, impeccably informative text and extended captions which reveal so much about how the old-time Hollywood publicity and marketing machines worked to sell the moviegoing world not only on particular stars, directors, films, but also on the sexiness of things like cigarette smoking and the patriotic duty of going to war. Talk about "The Hidden Persuaders"! I especially appreciate the groundbreaking information Rebello and Allen reveal about the actual artists (some very famous, like Norman Rockwell, Al Hirschfeld and Miguel Covarrubias) and art directors who were responsible for the distinct visual style of posters from MGM, Paramount, Universal, Columbia, RKO and even the so-called "poverty row" studios. There's even a lengthy section of illustrators' biography, complete with actual poster credits -- something I have never seen anywhere before this. What research the book must have taken! Awesome and essential, as I guess is to be expected from author Rebello, who also did the first-rate Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of `Psycho.' Only quibble: this book cries for a follow-up, so when will the authors get around to the sequel?
Fenius
You ought to see the poster for D. W. Griffith's "The Birth of a Nation" (1915), the movie that President Woodrow Wilson described as "history writ with lightning." It's a heroic poster of a Knight of the Ku Klux Klan on a rearing steed, a burning cross held aloft. The figure wears flowing robes -- shades of David's Napoleon -- underneath which his scarlet cuirasse is emblazoned with a white cross. His helmet -- yes, a helmet, not just a pillowcase with eye holes -- has a threatening foot-long spike atop. Spooky stuff, in more ways than one, yet in 1915 such a poster was a stunning icon, representing a movie whose director believed to be no more than a particularly dramatic but nevertheless realistic historical tale. The Klan rides to the rescue of white women.

One of the more impressive features of this thick little book is the stylized ways in which the actor's faces are drawn and painted. Most of the stars in the romances are a bit more, well, pretty than they were on screen. Some are beautified almost beyond recognition. Tyrone Power has the head of a mannequin. If I didn't know it was Mary Astor in "The Maltese Falcon," I wouldn't be able to tell from her poster. Others, monsters and manticores, are appropriate ghoulish. Sometimes the golden green gloom is used for effects other than the macabre. Man, do they bring out those Bette Davis eyes. You know -- the Bette Davis of "Now Voyager" (1942). The actress who murmured the immortal lines, "Oh, Jerry, let's not ask for the moon. We have the stars!"

There is an introduction describing the background of studios that are long disappeared -- Vitagraph, Pathe -- before they ALL virtually disappeared, but the text is only about two dozen pages long. It's interesting enough, and the subject is so seldom addressed, that one wishes for more. Nor is there any information to speak of for the individual posters. The artists, one presumes, were anonymous studio hacks but it would be nice to know something about them. Were they just doing a job? Were they Manet manque? Probably just doing a job, but they brought some talent to it. I'd love to know what the late Don Ivan Punchatz would have made of these illustrations.

All in all, with almost every stroke of the brush, they violate Samuel Goldwyn's pronouncement about movie posters: "That's the kind of advertising I like. No exaggeration. Just the facts."
Hudora
This is a must have book, even if you aren't "into movies". It is a sheer visual delight and a worthy addition to any library. Those with an interest in the graphic arts should definately acquire it. Arranged in a thoughtful manner, the glorious artwork is accompanied by intelligent text that is never dry and always informative.
Scoreboard Bleeding
Reel Art is like looking at a carpet sampling booklet. The paperback edition that is. Apart from a few none specific notes given a the front of the booklet the information on offer is very limited. Page after page of vintage posters with no text to accompany them makes this flick book an annoying "read". If all you require is visual this is an excellent choice. However, if you thought this book would actually tell you anything about the posters published, think again.
Hope you find this helpful. JG
Reel Art: Great Posters from the Golden Age of the Silver Screen download epub
Movies
Author: Richard Allen,Stephen Rebello
ISBN: 0896600335
Category: Humor & Entertainment
Subcategory: Movies
Language: English
Publisher: Abbeville Press; 1st Edition edition (September 1, 1992)
Pages: 342 pages