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Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture download epub

by Michael Anderegg


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Anderegg considers Welles's influence as an interpreter of Shakespeare for twentieth-century American popular audiences, drawing on his knowledge of the abundant, lowbrow popularity of Shakespeare in nineteenth-century America. Welles's three film adaptations of Shakespeare, Macbeth, Othello, and Chimes at Midnight, are examined. It is quite compact and offers chapters on all of the Shakespeare films Welles made.

Anderegg, Michael A. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

From early plays in school to the Everybody's Shakespeare books and the Mercury Text Records adaptations, Anderegg illustrates how Welles tried to transcend the barriers between the classical and the popular. He argues that "Welles the Shakespearean" sought to be a restorer as well as an innovator by drawing on his knowledge of the abundant, lowbrow popularity of Shakespeare in nineteenth-century America.

Start by marking Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture as Want to Read .

Start by marking Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. From early plays in school to the Everybody's Shakespeare books and the Mercury Text Records adaptations, Anderegg illustrates how Welles tried to transcend the barriers between the classical and the popular.

This is a bibliography of books by or about the director and actor Orson Welles. Hill, Roger and Welles, Orson (ed. Everybody's Shakespeare. Woodstock, Illinois: Todd Press, 1934. omnibus volume and three separate volumes, with abridged and. omnibus volume and three separate volumes, with abridged and annotated scripts of The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar and Twelfth Night). Welles, Orson, and Hill, Roger (ed. The Mercury Shakespeare. New York: Harper & Row, 1939.

Orson Welles was obsessed with Shakespeare

Orson Welles was obsessed with Shakespeare. He produced and starred in Shakespeare plays on Broadway and directed and starred in multiple versions of Shakespeare's work on film, including "Chimes at Midnight. Our guest is Michael Anderegg, Professor Emeritus of English at the University of North Dakota and the author of Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture. In 1999, Michael Anderegg, then a professor at the University of North Dakota, explored all the elements of Orson Welles's mission to save Shakespeare and put it down in a book, Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture.

Anderegg considers Welles's influence as an interpreter of Shakespeare for twentieth-century . Exploring his works on stage, radio, and in film, Anderegg reveals Welles's unique position as an artist of both high and popular culture.

Anderegg considers Welles's influence as an interpreter of Shakespeare for twentieth-century American popular audiences, drawing on his knowledge of the abundant, lowbrow popularity of Shakespeare in nineteenth-century America. At once intellectually respected and commercially viable, the Shakespeare Welles gave the American public reflects his unique genius as a writer, director, and actor.

In the final chapter, Anderegg surveys Welles's work as an actor-his legacy and myth-and . From the earliest days of radio to the golden age of television and beyond, Orson Welles has occupied a unique place in American culture.

In the final chapter, Anderegg surveys Welles's work as an actor-his legacy and myth-and reexamines the common view that he squandered his talents in the era after Citizen Kane. In Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture, Michael Anderegg considers Welles's influence as an interpreter of Shakespeare for twentieth-century American popular audiences.

From the earliest days of radio to the golden age of television and beyond, Orson Welles has occupied a unique place in American culture

From the earliest days of radio to the golden age of television and beyond, Orson Welles has occupied a unique place in American culture.

Author of Inventing Vietnam, David Lean, Lincoln and Shakespeare, Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and popular culture, William Wyler, Cinematic Shakespeare .

Author of Inventing Vietnam, David Lean, Lincoln and Shakespeare, Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and popular culture, William Wyler, Cinematic Shakespeare, Inventing Vietnam.

From the earliest days of radio to the golden age of television and beyond, Orson Welles has occupied a unique place in American culture. In Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture, Michael Anderegg considers Welles's influence as an interpreter of Shakespeare for twentieth-century American popular audiences. Exploring his works on stage, radio, and in film, Anderegg reveals Welles's unique position as an artist of both high and popular culture. At once intellectually respected and commercially viable, the Shakespeare Welles gave the American public reflects his unique genius as a writer, director, and actor. From early plays in school to the Everybody's Shakespeare books and the Mercury Text Records adaptations, Anderegg illustrates how Welles tried to transcend the barriers between the classical and the popular. He argues that "Welles the Shakespearean" sought to be a restorer as well as an innovator by drawing on his knowledge of the abundant, lowbrow popularity of Shakespeare in nineteenth-century America. Welles's three film adaptations of Shakespeare, Macbeth, Othello, and Chimes at Midnight, are examined. From his peculiarly "Scottish" version of Macbeth, to his postmodern reading of the history plays in Chimes at Midnight, Welles's interpretive strategies--and the public's reception of them--are considered. In the final chapter, Anderegg surveys Welles's work as an actor--his legacy and myth--and reexamines the common view that he squandered his talents in the era after Citizen Kane. Taking into account his non-Shakespearean roles, Anderegg shows Welles to have been a markedly "Shakespearean" actor and, in his versions of the Bard's plays, a key arbiter of culture.

Comments: (3)

Thoginn
This was a wonderful book. It examined Welles' career not in light of Citizen Kane but through his Shakespeare projects. This cast Welles in a very different light for me.

Welles tried to make Shakespeare accessible. To him, Shakespeare should not be something in a glass case at a museum. Thus he kept shaking up the Shakespeare plays he adapted. And critics hated him for it. His film of "Macbeth" in particular got raked over the coals.

The book shows how Shakespeare was regarded in American culture in the 20th Century and how Welles tried to shape that attitude. It is a slim book, but it gives the reader very much to think about in an accessible, jargon-free way.
Umsida
Anyone interested in Shakespeare and Orson Welles will want to buy this extremely useful and unusually thoughtful book. It is quite compact and offers chapters on all of the Shakespeare films Welles made. Anderegg argues tht Welles sought to democratize Shakespeare through the use of mass media such as records, radio, and film. there's a wonderful opening chapter about an I Love Lucy episode with Welles and a stunning conclusion about Welles as a star author (Anderegg contrast him with Bertolt Brecht). The book is very well-written and very accesible. Ideal for classroom use.
Doath
This is an interesting, if jargon-ridden, academic review of Orson Welles's career as a performer and interpreter of Shakespeare in various venues, mainly film and theater. The author leaves out one consideration, however: that Orson Welles said in a 1954 interview that Edward de Vere, aka the Earl of Oxford, wrote the Shakespeare canon. The book does mention de Vere and other aspects of Shakespeare skepticism-- but the author dismisses them and makes no connection to Welles.
It's a deliberate cover up! Welles would have loved it, since it's not hard to see, with his sharp eye for cover-ups and general fakery, why he was a Shakespeare skeptic. But then, Welles himself "covered up" in some later interviews, reverting to the traditional Stratford provincial identity. His notion of the identity remained ambivalent, however: in one interview he calls Shakespeare "a swine": in others he calls him the greatest man who ever lived.
Anyway, this book misses a chance to examine how authorship ambivalence affected the work of a great Shakespeare interpreter. There are intimations, as with the author's perception that Welles's Shakespeare is more existential than the vague "gentle Will" of Shakespeare biographies. But the big hole in the middle makes the book seem thin, for all its facts and statistics.
Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture download epub
Movies
Author: Michael Anderegg
ISBN: 0231112297
Category: Humor & Entertainment
Subcategory: Movies
Language: English
Publisher: Columbia University Press (January 15, 1999)
Pages: 216 pages