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Italian Horror Film Directors download epub

by Jesus Franco Manera,Antonella Fulci,Louis Paul


Epub Book: 1211 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1506 kb.

Chapters devoted to the major players (Bava, Fulci, et. and sections devoted to the not-so majors

For that price, you would expect beautiful stills on good quality paper; instead what you get is sparse black-and-white photos on poor quality paper. Chapters devoted to the major players (Bava, Fulci, et. and sections devoted to the not-so majors. He puts Freda in this category, but anybody who gave Maestro Bava his start AND made The Terror of Dr. Hitchcock is pretty important, in my opinion.

The directors discussed in detail are Dario Argento, Lamberto Bava, Mario Bava, Ruggero Deodato, Lucio Fulci . A second section contains short discussions and selected filmographies of other important horror directors.

The directors discussed in detail are Dario Argento, Lamberto Bava, Mario Bava, Ruggero Deodato, Lucio Fulci, Umberto Lenzi, Antonio Margheriti, Aristide Massaccesi, Bruno Mattei, and Michele Soavi. A second section contains short discussions and selected filmographies of other important horror directors

The directors discussed in detail are Dario Argento, Lamberto Bava, Mario Bava, Ruggero Deodato, Lucio Fulci . A second section contains short discussions and selected filmographies of other important horror directors

Chapters devoted to the major players (Bava, Fulci, et. On the positive side, Louis Paul does cover, to my knowledge, almost every major Italian horror movie and director. He covers many more giallos than does Phil Hardy.

Italian Horror Film Directors book. The directors discussed in detail are Dario Argento, Lamberto Bava, Mario Bava, Ruggero Deodata, Lucio Fulci, Umberto Lenzi, Antonia Margheriti, Aristede Massaccesi, Bruno Mattei, and Michele Soavi.

Italian Horror Film Directors. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. The second section lists other important directors, each with a short discussion and selected filmography.

There is no cinema with such effect as that of the hallucinatory Italian horror film  . The directors discussed in detail are Dario Argento, Lamberto Bava, Mario Bava, Ruggero Deodato, Lucio Fulci, Umberto Lenzi, Antonio Margheriti, Aristide Massaccesi, Bruno Mattei, and Michele Soavi.

Italian Horror Cinema. Nocella, Antonella Fulci, Camilla Fulci A Paguro Film production in association with 341 Production. Produced by Giada Mazzoleni, Daniele Bolcato Associated producer Claudio Rossoni.

Forewords by Jess Franco & Antonella Fulci.

There is no cinema with such effect as that of the hallucinatory horror of Italian horror films. From Riccardo Fredas I Vampiri in 1956 to Il Cartaio in 2004 (The Card Player), this work recounts the origins of the genre, celebrates ten auteurs who have contributed to Italian horror, mentions the many who have made noteworthy films, and discusses the influential genres associated with Italian horror.

The directors discussed in detail are Dario Argento, Lamberto Bava, Mario Bava, Ruggero Deodata, Lucio Fulci, Umberto Lenzi, Antonia Margheriti, Aristide Massaccesi, Bruno Mattei, and Michele Soavi. Each section includes a short biography, a detailed account of the subjects career, discussion of influences both literary and cinematic, commentary on the films, with plots and production details, and an exhaustive filmography. The second section lists other important directors, each with a short discussion and selected filmography. The work concludes with a chapter on the future of Italian horror and an appendix of important horror films by other directors, and is illustrated with stills, posters, and behind-the-scenes shots.


Comments: (7)

Sorryyy
Great book! Covers more movies (volume wise) than any of the other 5 or 6 related books I own. DOESN’T use a lot of words that nobody knows what they mean which only makes the author looks smart (which leaves most people lost because they don’t understand the sentence) . Only problem with the book is when they mention a movie it’s listed in Italian and they don’t give you the English name so “you” hav to constantly keep looking up the name of the movie on YouTube or IMDB to get the English name which is a big pain. Which begs to ask how can someone write a book in English, list the Italian name of the movie, but not the English name. Critical error. It reminds me of when your about to watch a movie- the soundtrack the lady is singing in English and they turn around and the movies in a foreign language could never figure that out.
Hinewen
I agree with the previous reviewer that Louis Pauls's new book comes as a bit of a disppointment. For that price, you would expect beautiful stills on good quality paper; instead what you get is sparse black-and-white photos on poor quality paper. The author's writing style doesn't help either: his bland style coupled with a lack of critical evaluations of the works of the major directors make this book pale in comparison to other much more exciting works, like Hardy's "The Overlook Film Encyclopedia: Horror" or Schneider's "Fear Without Frontiers". I am pretty sure "giallo cinema" is much more exciting and colorful than portrayed by the author.

On the positive side, Louis Paul does cover, to my knowledge, almost every major Italian horror movie and director. He covers many more giallos than does Phil Hardy. Also the index is very comprehensive and mentions both people and movies (both the English and Italian names).

All in all: could have been better but still a valuable reference.
Bludworm
It's not really bad, but it's nowhere near as good as one would hope or even expect with that price tag. This book is more for novices, whom I can't imagine would shell out fifty bucks for it. Those already familar with Italian horror will learn nothing new here. To make matters worst, the book is full of errors, some that even the most casual reader are likely to know to be wrong. Two examples being misidentifing one of the characters that Anna Falchi plays in Dellamorte, Dellamore (Cemetary Man)and the idenity of Asai Argento's mother. All this plus unwaranted critisim of the films themselves. At twenty bucks, it would be worth adding to any serious collection of books relating to horror films or films in general, at fifty bucks, If I could do it over again, I'd pass
Nightscar
Great book! A++
Amis
Excelent purchase for all those who want to know a little more about the italian horror cinema. This wonderful travel begins with a panorama over the history of the gothic and horror cinema in Italy; then, it shows the 10 most important giallo directors (Argento, Fulci, the Bavas among others); later, the author Louis Paul discusses briefly about more obscure directors. And at the end of the book, there's a really vast bibliography, very useful to those who want to make a research on this subject (italian horror cinema).
Ariseym
A much-needed study of the subject...but this ain't it. Chapters devoted to the major players (Bava, Fulci, etc.) and sections devoted to the not-so majors. He puts Freda in this category, but anybody who gave Maestro Bava his start AND made The Terror of Dr. Hitchcock is pretty important, in my opinion. And speaking of opinions.... The entries are mainly ______ was born in ______, got started in ________, and then made _______. Not much critical evaluation, and some of the information is glaringly wrong: Dawn of the Dead was made in...Philadelphia??? None of this would matter so much if this wasn't one of those incredibly expensive MacFarland books. For the money, there shouldn't be ANY errors! For completists -- and wealthy ones, at that -- only.
Vishura
Because of my preference for psychological horror, I had long resisted the Italian giallo. I've since come to realize my error. It is precisely its vast psychological component that makes the giallo unique. What other art form peers so unflinchingly into the darkest recess of the human psyche? This book helped me form that appreciation. In addition to offering hundreds of plot summaries, the author discusses the films' psychological underpinnings at length; musing as to what makes them tick individually and what makes the genre tick as a whole. There is also a wealth of well-organized reference material, exhaustively researched and detailed, for those who wish to dive deep into the arcana. I turned to the book to find out which Gogol story served as the basis for Bava's "Black Sunday" (since the story's title isn't listed in the film's credits) and found the answer immediately.

On the down side, the author has a preference for the movies' Italian titles, which meant I had to frequently thumb through the book for translations. (Although longtime fans of the genre may not be bothered by this.)
Italian Horror Film Directors download epub
Movies
Author: Jesus Franco Manera,Antonella Fulci,Louis Paul
ISBN: 0786418346
Category: Humor & Entertainment
Subcategory: Movies
Language: English
Publisher: McFarland Publishing (November 15, 2004)
Pages: 376 pages